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Medieval Timeline

By Smav7
  • 476

    Fall of the Roman Empire and start of Middle Ages

    The fall of the Roman Empire. Rome had ruled much of Europe. Now much of the land would fall into confusion as local kings and rulers tried to grab power. This is the start of the Dark Ages or the Middle Ages.
  • Period: 476 to Jan 1, 1500

    Middle Ages

    The fall of the Roman Empire to the start of the High Renaissance
  • Jan 1, 605

    China begin work on Grand Canal

    China begins work on the Grand Canal.
  • Jan 1, 718

    Reconquista and Islam in Spain

    Reconquista and Islam in Spain
    The Reconquista is the name given to a long series of wars and battles between the Christian Kingdoms and the Muslim Moors for control of the Iberian Peninsula. It lasted for a good portion of the Middle Ages from 718 to 1492.
  • Jan 1, 787

    First Assylum for Abandoned Infants

    Datheus, archbishop of Milan, founded the first asylum for abandoned infants. Quoted saying- "As soon as the child is exposed at the door of the church, it will be received in the hospital and confided to the care of those who will be paid to look after them."
  • Jan 1, 827

    Muslim conquest of Sicily

    Muslim conquest of Sicily
    The Muslim conquest of Sicily began in 827 and lasted until 902, when the last major Byzantine stronghold on the island, Taormina, fell. Isolated fortresses remained in Byzantine hands thereafter, but the island was henceforth under Muslim rule until conquered in turn by the Normans in the 11th century.
  • Jan 1, 835

    Vikings Invade!

    Vikings from the Scandinavian lands (Denmark, Norway, and Sweden) begin to invade northern Europe. They would continue until 1042.
  • Jan 1, 932

    Chinese Printers

    Chinese printers adapt Wood-block printing to mass produce classical books.
  • Jan 1, 950

    New Zealand

    New Zealand discovered by Maori
  • Jan 1, 979

    Vikings Attack!

    Vikings from Denmark renew their raids on England, attacking Chester and Southampton. This period of invasions will continue through 1016.
  • Jan 1, 1054

    The Great Schism

    The Great Schism
    The Great Schism of 1054 was the split between the Eastern and Western Christian Churches. In 1054, relations between the Greek speaking Eastern of the Byzantine empire and the Latin speaking Western traditions within the Christian Church reached a terminal crisis. This crisis led to the separation between the Eastern and Western churches and is referred to as the Great Schism of 1054. The Christian Church split along doctrinal, theological, linguistic, political, and geographic lines. The split
  • Jan 1, 1066

    William of Normandy

    William of Normandy
    William of Normandy, a French Duke, conquers England in the Battle of Hastings. He became King of England and changed the country forever
  • Oct 1, 1066

    Battle of Hastings

    Battle of Hastings
    The English Army prepare their defences at Senlac - which is where the actual Battle of Hastings was situated
  • Oct 15, 1066

    End of the Battle of Hastings

    Both the Normans and the Saxons bury their dead. William the Conqueror had defeated the Saxons at the Battle of Hastings
  • Jul 14, 1077

    Bayeux Tapestry

    Bayeux Tapestry
    The Bayeux Tapestry is not actually a tapestry at all - it is an embroidery! Coloured wool was used to embroider important scenes which led up to the Norman invasion of England and the Battle at Hastings in 1066. The Bayeux tapestry consists of eight long strips of unbleached linen which have been sewn together to form a continuous panel - this linen forms the background of the Bayeux tapestry. The Bayeux tapestry is about 20 inches high and 230 feet long.
  • Jan 1, 1086

    Domesday Book

     Domesday Book
    The first draft was completed in 1085 and the document was completed by 1086. The book was a survey, or census, commissioned by the Norman Conqueror King William I, of his newly conquered lands and possessions in England. It was intended to document "What, or how much, each man had, who was an occupier of land in England, either in land or in stock, and how much money it were worth". This great survey enabled the Normans and William the Conqueror to administer England and levy taxes.
  • Aug 15, 1096

    First Crusade

    First Crusade
    August 15, 1096 is the set day it started. The Crusades were wars between the Holy Roman Empire and the Muslims over the Holy Land. There would be several Crusades over the next 200 years
    It was launched on 27 November 1095 by Pope Urban II
    Ended 1099
  • Jan 1, 1144

    Second Crusade

    Second Crusade
    Crusaders prepared to attack Damascus. 2nd crusade led by Holy Roman Emperor Conrad III and by King Louis VII of France.
    Ended 1155
  • Jan 1, 1187

    Third Crusade

    Third Crusade
    3rd Crusade led by Richard the Lionheart of England, Philip II of France, and Holy Roman Emperor Frederick I. Richard I made a truce with Saladin
    Ended 1192
  • Jan 1, 1202

    Fourth Crusade

    Fourth Crusade
    4th Crusade led by Fulk of Neuil French/Flemish advanced on Constantinople
    Ended 1204
  • Jan 1, 1215

    Magna Carta

    Magna Carta
    King John of England signs the Magna Carta. This document gave the people some rights and said the king was not above the law.
  • Jan 1, 1217

    Fifth Crusade

    Fifth Crusade
    The 5th Crusade led by King Andrew II of Hungary, Duke Leopold VI of Austria, John of Brienne
    Ended 1221
  • Jan 1, 1228

    Sixth Crusade

    Sixth Crusade
    1228 The 6th Crusade led by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II
    Ended 1229
  • Jan 1, 1248

    Seventh Crusade

    Seventh Crusade
    The 7th Crusade led by Louis IX of France
    Ended 1254
  • Jan 1, 1270

    Eighth Crusade

    Eighth Crusade
    The 8th Crusade led by Louis IX
  • Jan 1, 1271

    Ninth Crusade

    Ninth Crusade
    The 9th Crusade led by Prince Edward (later Edward I of England)
    Ended 1272
  • Jan 1, 1271

    Marco Polo

    Marco Polo
    Marco Polo leaves on his famous journey to explore Asia.
  • Jun 4, 1337

    Hundred Years War

    Hundred Years War
    The Hundred Years War was fought between England and France and lasted from 1337 to 1453. The war was a series of battles with long periods of peace in between.
    Small disputes and battles had been going on between the French and the English for years. However, in 1337, King Edward III of England claimed that he was the rightful king of France.
  • Jun 5, 1381

    Peasants Revolt

    Peasants Revolt
    The peasants who survived the Black Death (1348-1350) believed that there was something special about them – almost as if God had protected them. Therefore, they took the opportunity offered by the disease to improve their lifestyle. Feudal law stated that peasants could only leave their village if they had their lord’s permission. But many lords were short of desperately needed labour for the land that they owned. After the Black Death, lords actively encouraged peasants to leave the village wh
  • May 30, 1431

    Death of Joan of Arc

    Death of Joan of Arc
    Joan of Arc is best known for leading the French against the English in the Hundred Years War at a young age
    French heroine Joan of Arc is executed by England at the age of 19. May 30, 1431 Rouen, France
  • Jan 1, 1434

    The Medici

    The Medici
    1434 - The Medici family becomes the head of the city-state of Florence.The Medici are most famous for their patronage of the arts. Patronage is where a wealthy person or family sponsors artists. They would pay artists commissions for major works of art. The Medici patronage had a huge impact on the Renaissance, allowing artists to focus on their work without having to worry about money.
    The Medici didn't just support the arts and architecture. They also supported science. They supported the fa
  • Jan 1, 1437

    The Black Death

    The Black Death
  • Jan 1, 1444

    Invention of the Printing Press

    Invention of the Printing Press
    German inventor Johannes Gutenberg invents the printing press. This will signal the start of the Renaissance.
  • Jun 3, 1453

    End of Byzantiom

    End of Byzantiom
    The Ottoman Empire captures the city of Constantinople. This signals the end of the Eastern Roman Empire also known as Byzantium.
  • Jun 3, 1453

    Capture of Constantinople

    Capture of Constantinople
    The Ottoman Empire captures the city of Constantinople. This signals the end of the Eastern Roman Empire also known as Byzantium.
  • Jun 4, 1453

    End of the Hundred Years War

    The French were inspired by Joan of Arc's leadership and sacrifice. They continued to fight back. They pushed the English army out of France taking Bordeaux in 1453 signaling the end of the Hundred Years War.
  • Jun 4, 1455

    The Wars of the Roses

    The Wars of the Roses
    The Wars of the Roses was a civil war fought in England. It lasted for just over 30 years from 1455 to 1485, however, the battles were mostly small and sometimes were years apart.
    The "War of the Roses" comes from the symbols, or badges, of the two warring houses: the House of Lancaster was represented by a red rose and the House of York by a white rose. The reasons behind the wars were complex. Both houses claimed to have a right to the English throne as descendents of King Edward.
  • Jun 3, 1482

    "The Last Supper"

    "The Last Supper"
    Leonardo Da Vinci paints "The Last Supper"
  • Jan 1, 1492

    Christopher Columbus

    Explorer Christopher Columbus discovers the Americas.