The Crusades 1-4

Timeline created by SilentDcM
In History
  • Nov 27, 1095

    Beginning

    Beginning
    Pope Urban II called for crusade to help the Byzantines and to free the city of Jerusalem.
  • May 14, 1097

    Siege of Nicaea

    Siege of Nicaea
    This city was besieged by the Crusaders, under Godefroi de Bouillon. The Saracens were greatly aided in the defence by the possession of Lake Ascanius, but the crusaders still managed to takeover the city. Two determined attempts to relieve it were made by the Sultan Soliman, but both failed, and Nicaea surrendered June 20.
  • Jul 1, 1097

    Battle of Dorylaeum

    Battle of Dorylaeum
    Fought in July 1097, between 70,000 Crusaders under Bohemond and Raymond of Thoulouse, and 250,000 Saracens under the Sultan Soliman. The Saracens drove back Bohemond's division on their camp, which they proceeded to plunder, and, while so engaged, were attacked by Raymond and totally routed with a loss of 30,000. The Crusaders lost 4,000.
  • Oct 20, 1097

    Siege of Antioch

    Siege of Antioch
    The Crusaders under Godefroi de Bouillon, and defended by a Saracen garrison under Baghasian. The siege was unskillfully conducted, and provisions and munitions ran short in the Christian camp, with the result that the place held out till June 3, 1098. Afterwards a massacre took place, which 10,000 defenders were killed. Weeks later Saracen forces attempted to attack the Christians, but they would fail. Giving the Christians another victory.
  • Jul 15, 1099

    Ending of First Crusade

    Ending of First Crusade
    The Crusaders, under Godefroi de Bouillon. Siege the city of Jerusalem ending the First Crusade.
  • Dec 1, 1145

    Beginning of Second Crusade

    Beginning of Second Crusade
    Pope Eugene III launches Second Crusade to recapture recent territory lost to the Muslims
  • Jul 1, 1147

    Siege of Lisbon

    Siege of Lisbon
    The crusaders agreed to help King Alfonso I of Portugal to attack Lisbon to get rid of Moorish warlords. In return the King offered to the crusaders the pillage of the city's goods and the ransom money for expected prisoners. After four months, Moorish rulers surrendered on October 24th.
  • Jul 23, 1148

    Siege of Damascus

    Siege of Damascus
    The crusaders decided to attack Damascus from the west, where orchards would provide them with a constant food supply. The defenders had sought help from Saif ad-Din Ghazi I of Aleppo and Nur ad-Din of Mosul, who personally led an attack on the crusader camp. The crusaders were pushed back from the walls into the orchards, where they were prone to ambushes and guerrilla attacks.
  • Jul 15, 1149

    End of Second Crusade

    End of Second Crusade
    After failing to capture Damascus. Christian forces began to feel betrayed by eachother. This ends the Crusade with the Crusaders accomplishing nothing.
  • Oct 29, 1187

    Beginning of Third Crusade

    Beginning of Third Crusade
    Saladin, the Saltan of Egypt gained control of Jerulsalem in 1187. The idea of Muslims parading around their Holy Land was horrid and the call of another Holy fight rose from the mouths of Christians all around Europe. Led by Frederick I Barbarossa of Germany, Philip II Augustus of France, and Richard I Lionheart of England.
  • Aug 28, 1189

    Siege of Acre

    Siege of Acre
    Siege was laid to this city by the Christians, and it was defended by the Saracens for two years, during which the Crusaders are said to have lost 120,000 men. In June, 1191, the Christians were reinforced by an English army under Richard Coeur de Lion, and in the following month the Saracens surrendered.
  • Aug 4, 1192

    Battle of Jaffa

    Battle of Jaffa
    Battle between the army of Sultan and Christian forces. It was the final battle of the Third Crusade, after which Saladin and King Richard were able to negotiate a truce. Although the Crusaders did not regain possession of Jerusalem, Christian pilgrims were permitted entry into the city, and the Crusaders were able to retain control of a sizable strip of land stretching from Beirut to Jaffa.
  • Oct 9, 1192

    Ending of Third Crusade

    Ending of Third Crusade
    On September 2, 1192, Richard finalized a treaty with Saladin by which Jerusalem would remain under Muslim control, but which also allowed unarmed Christian pilgrims and merchants to visit the city. The successes of the Third Crusade would allow the Crusaders to maintain a considerable kingdom based in Cyprus and the Syrian coast. However, its failure to recapture Jerusalem would lead to the call for a Fourth Crusade six years later.
  • Aug 1, 1198

    Calling of Fourth Crusade

    Pope Innocent III calls for Fourth Crusade to recapture the Holy Lands
  • Nov 10, 1202

    Siege of Zara

    Siege of Zara
    After a broken deal between the Crusades and Venetians. Venetians make Crusaders invade the city of Zara
  • Jul 18, 1203

    Siege Constantinopole

    Siege Constantinopole
    The city was besieged by the French and Venetian Crusaders under Count Thibaut de Champagne. After a feeble defence, it was surrendered July 18, by the Usurper, Alexius, and occupied by the Crusaders, who restored Isaac Angelus to the throne, and withdrew.
  • Apr 8, 1204

    Sack of Constantinople

    Sack of Constantinople
    After a three month battle, in the course of which Isaac Angelus died, and Mourzoufle assumed the purple, the Crusaders stormed and pillaged the city. Baldwin was then proclaimed first Latin Emperor of the Fast.
  • Period:
    Nov 27, 1095
    to
    Dec 31, 1291

    The Crusades

    Series of Holy Wars
  • Period:
    Nov 27, 1095
    to
    Jun 23, 1101

    The First Crusade

    The People's Crusade
  • Period:
    Dec 1, 1145
    to
    Jul 15, 1149

    The Second Crusade

    Second major Crusade in response to the fall of the County of Edessa
  • Period:
    Oct 29, 1187
    to
    Oct 9, 1192

    The Third Crusade

    Kings' Crusade. Attempt to recapture the Holy Land from Saladin
  • Period:
    Nov 10, 1202
    to
    Apr 13, 1204

    The Fourth Crusade

    Called to recapture Jerusalem, but instead captured Constantinople. Leads to The Latin Empire