the History of French English Relations in Canada

  • World War One Conscription Crisis

    World War One Conscription Crisis
    A disagreement on whether men should be conscripted to fight in the war. The country was split, as some parts of the country felt conscription was necessary, while the other thought otherwise. This caused a split in English-French relations as well.
  • Creation of the Union Nationale Party

    Creation of the Union Nationale Party
  • Period: to

    Dark Era/Maurice Duplessis

    Quebec Economy stagnant, Known for bribery and corruption. Led the Union Nationale Party and believed Quebec to be a distinct society.
  • World War Two Conscription Crisis

    World War Two Conscription Crisis
    French-English relations strained once again, but not broken. Sense of unity still lingered in the country.
  • Period: to

    Quiet Revolution

    It was a period of socio-political and socio-cultural change in Quebec. It refers to the efforts of the liberal efforts of Jean Lesage and Robert Bourassa.
  • 1960s Separatist Movement

    1960s Separatist Movement
    Quebec wanted to seperate and become independent from the rest of Canada.
  • 1962 Maitre Chez Nous (Jean Lesage, Liberal Party Campaign slogan)

    1962 Maitre Chez Nous (Jean Lesage, Liberal Party Campaign slogan)
    Quebec wanted to encourage its citizens to feel more powerful, so as to encourage separatist ideals.
  • Bi& Bi Commission (Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism) investigationby Lester B. Pearson

    Bi& Bi Commission (Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism) investigationby Lester B. Pearson
    It was a commission put in place by Pearson to "inquire into and report upon the existing state of bilingualism and biculturalism in Canada and to recommend what steps should be taken to develop the Canadian Confederation on the basis of an equal partnership between the two founding races, taking into account the contribution made by the other ethnic groups to the cultural enrichment of Canada and the measures that should be taken to safeguard that contribution".
  • Canada’s New Flag 1965

    Canada’s New Flag 1965
    It was a flag designed to strengthen Canada's independence from Britain, and was asked to be a "distinctly Canadian flag".
  • 1967 Canada’s Immigration Policy becomes “Colour Blind”

    1967 Canada’s Immigration Policy becomes “Colour Blind”
    Before this, British and northern European immigrants were preffered. After the change, all people immigrating to Canada were subject to the same rights.
  • Trudeau Becomes Prime Minister

    Trudeau Becomes Prime Minister
    Trudeau became PM in April 20, 1968, to 1979, and then again from 1980 to 1984. He was a liberal, and believed in strengthening Eng-Fr relations.
  • Official Languages Act passed, 1969

    Official Languages Act passed, 1969
    Canada officially became a bilingual country, with both English and French as its new official languages.
  • Front de liberation du Quebec LQ party is formed

    Front de liberation du Quebec LQ party is formed
    Implementation of war measures act. The FLQ had stepped up their radical seperationist activity by kidnapping British diplomat John Cross. The FLQ woud only release Cross if FLQ prisoners were given amnesty for crimes against Canada.
  • FLQ Crisis (Oct 5, 1970) aka October Crisis,

    FLQ Crisis (Oct 5, 1970) aka October Crisis,
    Continuation of the FLQ formation. The War Measures Act was invoked by Trudeau, and the FLQ had no choice but to give up Cross. The kidnappers of Cross chose exile to Cuba rather than face interrogation in Quebec.
  • Policy of Multiculturalism 1971

    Policy of Multiculturalism 1971
    Canada recognized the rights that everyone had to their own culture, language, and so on.
  • 1974 Bill 22 introduced by Robert Bourassa

    1974 Bill 22 introduced by Robert Bourassa
    Robert Bourassa introduced Bill 22 making French the official language of Quebec (not a bi-ling province like other provinces).
    Rationale: French birth rates were declining but immigration was increasing. Bourassa feared the disappearance of the French language.
  • 1976 Immigration policy moves to ‘sponsorship program’

    1976 Immigration policy moves to ‘sponsorship program’
    Families can now sponsor other families, meaning that you take responsibility for others i.e. paying their food, rent, etc. Until they get a job.
  • 1976 Parti Quebecois wins provincial election on Quebec

    1976 Parti Quebecois wins provincial election on Quebec
    PQ party is led by Renée Levesque and promises Quebec seperation by first holding a province-wide referendum on the issue.
  • 1976 Bill 101 introduced by Parti Quebecois, Rene Levesque

    1976 Bill 101 introduced by Parti Quebecois, Rene Levesque
    The Parti Quebecois introduce Bill 101. Bill 101 was a bill that defined French as the official language of Quebec and framed fundamental language rights. The way this was different from 22, was that if you lived in Quebec, you had to change your language to French, and not speak English at all.
  • 1977 Bill 101 passed

    1977 Bill 101 passed
    The bill was finally passed in 1977 despite protests from other provinces.
  • 1980 Referendum on Sovereignty Association (include the results of the referendum)

    1980 Referendum on Sovereignty Association (include the results of the referendum)
    Sovereignty Association(Levesques Prov Govt) - Levesque asked people to vote "yes" to negotiating a new agreement with Canada based on sovereign association. The prospect that Quebec coud become independent, yet maintain a close economic relationship with Canada "Maître chez-nous". Restult of Referendum: 40% yes, 60% no.
  • 1982 Patriation of the Constitution

    1982 Patriation of the Constitution
    The Patriation of the Constitution took the British North America Act and took it from British power, and gave it to Canadian federal power, once again proving its strength from Britain.
  • 1982 Constitution Act

    1982 Constitution Act
    The Constitution Act, 1982 enshrined the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in the Constitution, and completed the unfinished business of Canadian independence — allowing Canadians to amend their own Constitution without requiring approval from Britain.
  • Brian Mulroney becomes Prime Minister

    Brian Mulroney becomes Prime Minister
    Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, lawyer, businessman, politician, prime minister of Canada 1984 to 1993 (born 20 March 1939 in Baie-Comeau, QC).
  • 1987 Reform Party Created

    1987 Reform Party Created
    The party's platform included traditional prairie populist reform panaceas such as free trade and direct democracy (referendums, initiatives and recall), and some contemporary proposals such as the Triple-E (equal, elected and effective) Senate.
  • Bloc Quebecois Formed 1987

    Bloc Quebecois Formed 1987
    The Bloc Québécois is a federal political party that was created officially on 15 June 1991 (registered by Elections Canada on 11 September 1993). It currently runs candidates in 75 Québec ridings.
  • Meech Lake Accord 1987

    Meech Lake Accord 1987
    In 1987 the Progressive Conservative government of Prime Minister Brian Mulroney attempted to win Québec's consent to the revised Canadian Constitution — following the Québec government's rejection of it in 1981.
  • 1990 Meech Lake Accord

    1990 Meech Lake Accord
    On a Sunday evening, June 3, 1990, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and the ten provincial premiers marked the third anniversary of the Meech Lake Accord at a dinner in the architectural splendour of the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Hull, Quebec.
  • 1992 Charlottetown Accord

    1992 Charlottetown Accord
    The Charlottetown Accord of 1992 was a failed, joint attempt by the government of Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and all 10 provincial premiers to amend the Canadian Constitution, specifically to obtain Quebec's consent to the Constitution Act of 1982.
  • 1994 Parti Quebecois returned to power

    1994 Parti Quebecois returned to power
    The Parti Quebecois once again won in Quebec.
  • 30 Oct 1995 2nd Referendum on Sovereignty Association

    30 Oct 1995 2nd Referendum on Sovereignty Association
    Held on 30 October 1995, the referendum on Québec sovereignty was settled by a narrow victory for the “No” camp — as had been the case in the 1980 referendum.
  • 1998 Clarity Bill and the Supreme Court decision

    1998 Clarity Bill and the Supreme Court decision
    Bill C-20, the bill known as the Clarity Act gives effect to the requirement for clarity set out by the Supreme Court of Canada in the Québec Secession Reference