Samuel Ogando Miras_GYH_4ºD

Timeline created by Samuel Ogando Miras
In History
  • Period: 1492 to

    Modern history

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    Enclosure Acts

    A serie of laws called Enclousure act were passed by the British Parliament to authorise this process, which led to a concentration of land ownership. This reorganisation of land benefited the big landowners, who were able to produce more and increase their profits.
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    Enclosure Acts

    A serie of laws called the enclousure acts were passed by the Bristish Parliament to authorise this process, which led to a concentration of land ownership. This reorganisation of land benefited the big landowners, who ere able to produce more and increase their profits.
  • John Kay’s flying shuttle

    John Kay’s flying shuttle
    The mechanisation process started with Jhon Kay's flying shuttle, which increased the speed of production made it possible to weave wider fabrics, and spinning machines (the spinning jenny, spinning mule and water frame), which significantlyincreased productivity.
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    First Industrial Revolution (c. 1750 – 1880)

    The Industrial Revolution or First Industrial Revolution is the process of economic, social and technological transformation that began in the second half of the 18th century in the Kingdom of Great Britain, which spread a few decades later to much of Western Europe and North America, and that concluded between 1820 and 1840. During this period the largest set of economic, technological and social transformations in the history of mankind took place.
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    First Industrial Revolution (c. 1750 – 1880)

    The Industrial Revolution or First Industrial Revolution is the process of economic, social and technological transformation that began in the second half of the 18th century in the Kingdom of Great Britain, which spread a few decades later to much of Western Europe and Anglo-Saxon America, and that concluded between 1820 and 1840. During this period the largest set of economic, technological and social transformations in the history of mankind took place.
  • James Watt’s steam engine

    The Watt steam engine, alternatively known as the Boulton and Watt steam engine, was an early steam engine and was one of the driving forces of the Industrial Revolution. Watt's design saved so much more fuel compared with earlier designs that they were licensed based on the amount of fuel they would save. . Watt's design became synonymous with steam engines, and it was many years before significantly new designs began to replace the basic Watt design.
  • James Watt’s steam engine

    James Watt’s steam engine
    The Watt steam engine, alternatively known as the Boulton and Watt steam engine, was an early steam engine and was one of the driving forces of the Industrial Revolution. Watt's design saved so much more fuel compared with earlier designs that they were licensed based on the amount of fuel they would save. Watt's design became synonymous with steam engines, and it was many years before significantly new designs began to replace the basic Watt design.
  • Adam Smith publishes The Wealth of Nations

    Adam Smith publishes The Wealth of Nations
    In 1776, Adam Smith published The Wealth of Nations, probably the most influential book on market economics ever written. ... In 1759, Smith published The Theory of Moral Sentiments. His book looked at human nature and ethics. At the beginning of the book, he stated that all people had the capacity to care about others.
  • Invention of the power loom

    Invention of the power loom
    The first power loom was designed in 1787 by Edmund Cartwright and first built in 1787. It was refined over the next 47 years until a design by Kenworthy and Bullough made the operation completely automatic. By the year 1850, there were 260,000 power looms in operation in England. It increased fabric production and lowered its cost.
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    Contemporary History

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    Constitutional monarchy

    A constitutional monarchy is a form of monarchy in which the sovereign exercises authority in accordance with a written or unwritten constitution. On 3 September 1791, the National Constituent Assembly forced king Louis XVI to accept the French Constitution of 1791, thus turning the absolute monarchy into a constitutional monarchy.
  • Estates-General meeting

    Estates-General meeting
    The Estates General of 1789 was a general assembly representing the French estates of the realm.
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    French Revolution

    The French Revolution was a social and political conflict, with various periods of violence, that convulsed France and, by extension of its implications, other nations in Europe that faced supporters and opponents of the system known as the Old Regime.
  • Tennis Court Oath (Proclamation of the National Assembly)

    Tennis Court Oath (Proclamation of the National Assembly)
    On 20 June 1789, the members of the French Third Estate took the Tennis Court Oath. It was a pivotal event in the French Revolution.
  • Storming of the Bastille

    Storming of the Bastille
    The storming of the Bastille took place in Paris on Tuesday July 14, 1789. Despite the fact that the medieval fortress known as the Bastille only guarded seven prisoners, its fall into the hands of the Parisian revolutionaries symbolically marked the end of the Old Regime and the starting point of the French Revolution.
  • Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

    Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen
    On 26 August 1789, the French National Constituent Assembly issued the Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen which defined individual and collective rights at the time of the French Revolution.
  • First French constitution

    First French constitution
    The short-lived French Constitution of 1791 was the first written constitution in France, created after the collapse of the absolute monarchy of the Ancien Régime.
  • Women’s March on Versailles

    Women’s March on Versailles
    The Women's March on Versailles was an important event at the start of the French Revolution. It gave the revolutionaries confidence in the power of the people over the king. In 1789 France, the main food of the commoners was bread.
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    Social Republic

    The betrayal by the king and the military invasion led to the revolt by the common people ( sans-culottes ). On 10 August 1792, they stormed Tuileries Palace and impresioned the royal family. A republic was declared and the second phase of the revolution began. This period was governed by two types of radical bourgeoisie: Girondists and Jacobins. Their objectives were declare a republican democratic government and universal male suffrage and social classes.
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    Girondin Convention

    When Girondin controlled the republican they created a new assembly, the National Assembly, thet was elected by universal male suffrage. Monarchies in Europe formed an absolutist coalition against France. Inside the country, counter-revolutionary revolt broke out the former privileged classes organised royalist plots.
  • War of the First Coalition

    War of the First Coalition
    The First Coalition is known as the first coordinated effort of the European monarchies to contain the French Revolution.
  • Storm of Tuileries Palace

    Storm of Tuileries Palace
    The Insurrection of 10 August 1792 was a defining event of the French Revolution, when armed revolutionaries in Paris, increasingly in conflict with the French monarchy, stormed the Tuileries Palace. The conflict led France to abolish the monarchy and establish a republic.
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    Jacobin Convention

    When Jacobins governed the republic, they signed a new constitution that recognised popular sovereignty (universal male suffrage) and the right to social equality was enacted. The executive power was led by a committe of public safety, which gave power to the jacobin leader Robespierre.
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    Reign of Terror

    To reject the Austrian invasion, a mass levy was organised that forced all citizens to join the army. To stop the conspirations, the Reign of Terror was imposed. Freedoms were suspended and people opposed to the government were either imprisoned or revolutionary courts ordered their execution by guillotine ( Law of Suspect )
  • Execution of Louis XVI

    Execution of Louis XVI
    One day after being convicted of conspiracy with foreign powers and sentenced to death by the French National Convention, King Louis XVI is executed by guillotine in the Place de la Revolution in Paris. ... There, Louis was forced to accept the constitution of 1791, which reduced him to a mere figurehead.
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    Conservative Republic

    The moderate bourgeoisie took back control of the Revolution and it entered its third and final phase. Jacobin laws were cancelled and exiles from the Reign of Terror were encouraged to return. A new Constitution granted executive power to a collegial government, known as the Directory, and restored census suffrage
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    The Consulate

    The Consulate was the top-level Government of France from the fall of the Directory in the coup of Brumaire on 10 November 1799 until the start of the Napoleonic Empire on 18 May 1804. By extension, the term The Consulate also refers to this period of French history.
  • Coup of 18th Brumaire

    Coup of 18th Brumaire
    The coup d'état of Brumaire 18 of the year VII in France refers to the coup d'état that took place on that date on the French republican calendar and started the Consulate with Napoleon Bonaparte as leader.
  • Constitution of 1800

    Constitution of 1800
    A referendum ratifying the constitution of the French consulate was held in February 1800. 53.74% of voters abstained. The official results, as announced by Lucien Bonaparte, Minister of the Interior and brother of First Consul Napoleon Bonaparte, were 99.9% in favor of the new constitution.
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    The Napoleonic Empire

    It was a sovereign state that included a large part of western and central Europe in its territory
  • Napoleon crowned emperor

    Napoleon crowned emperor
    The coronation of Napoleon as Emperor of the French took place on Sunday, December 2, 1804 , at Notre-Dame de Paris in Paris
  • Invasion of Spain and Joseph Bonaparte crowned king

    Invasion of Spain and Joseph Bonaparte crowned king
    Napoleon invaded Spain and he crowned his brother as the king of Spain
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    Luddite movement (c. 1811-1817)

    The first workers protest against industrialisation were the Luddites. The Luddite movement started in England in the early 19th century. It consisted of the violent destruction of machinery in the belief that it was responsible for low wages and unemployment.
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    The Restoration of absolutism

    Between 1814 and 1815, the powers that defeated Napoleon met at the Congress of Vienna. They wanted to stop the spread of liberal ideas and restore absolutism in Europe. The four great powers reshaped the European map to their advantage.
  • Congress of Vienna and Holy Alliance Treaty

    Congress of Vienna and Holy Alliance Treaty
    The Congress of Vienna was a meeting were the most powerful kingdoms reshaped the European map, restored absolutism in Europe, stop liberal ideas and found the Holy Alliance. Holy Alliance Agreement signed at the Congress of Vienna by the crowned heads of Russia, Prussia, and Austria. Its purpose was to re-establish the principle of hereditary rule and to suppress democratic and nationalist movements, which sprung up in the wake of the French Revolution
  • Battle of Waterloo

    Battle of Waterloo
    The Battle of Waterloo was a combat that took place on June 18, 1815 in the vicinity of Waterloo, a town in present-day Belgium located about twenty kilometers south of Brussels, between the French army, commanded by the Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte, against British, Dutch and German troops.
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    Greek War of Independence

    Greece had been part of the Ottoman Empire for centuries. Greeks had to pay high taxes, they were excluded from state administration jobs and they felt dominated by a group of people with a different religion and culture. The greeks declared independence but it wasn't recognides by the turks and it resulted in the beggining of a war. With the help of french and British military interventions the greeks defeated the Ottoman Empire and gaines its independece in 1830
  • Abolishment of the Combination Acts

    Abolishment of the Combination Acts
    The English Combination Acts forbade workers to organize for the purpose of obtaining higher wages or controlling work-place conditions. The acts were repealed in 1824 as the result of a campaign led by the radical London tailor and political agitator Francis Place and the radical member of Parliament Joseph Hume. The social basis of the campaign was the skilled artisan class, particularly in London, rather than factory workers or laborers.
  • Stephenson’s Steam locomotive

    Stephenson’s Steam locomotive
    Stephenson's Rocket was one of the first steam locomotives. Although the "Rocket" was not the first steam locomotive, it was the first to bring together several innovations, becoming the most advanced of its time. It is the most famous example of the evolution of Stephenson's locomotive design, and it became the benchmark for most steam engines for the next 150 years.
  • Revolutions of 1830

    Revolutions of 1830
    The Revolutions of 1830 were a revolutionary wave in Europe which took place in 1830. It included two "romantic nationalist" revolutions, the Belgian Revolution in the United Kingdom of the Netherlands and the July Revolution in France along with revolutions in Congress Poland, Italian states, Portugal and Switzerland.
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    The Age of the revolutions

    The period between 1830 and 1848 was marked by a lot of tensions and turmoil in Europe. Europe had witnessed the dramatic rise of two philosophies, liberalism and conservatism. The liberal nationalists or the educated middle class planned ways to overthrow monarchy and bring in a government of the people.
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    The Belgian Revolution

    Belgium was made part of the kingdom of Holland by the Congress of Vienna in 1815. The spread of liberal ideas helped the Belgian revolution and Belgium became a liberal monarchy ruled by Leopold I. It finally ended when Netherlands recognised Belgium's independence in 1839.
  • Zollverein

    Zollverein
    Zollverein, (German: “Customs Union”) German customs union established in 1834 under Prussian leadership. It created a free-trade area throughout much of Germany and is often seen as an important step in German reunification.
  • Grand National Consolidated Trades Union

    Grand National Consolidated Trades Union
    The Grand National Consolidated Trades Union, which brought together different types of workers, was founded in 1834. Its first tasks were to defend the right of association, to reduce the working day, to improve wages and to regulate child labour.
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    German Unification process

    In 1848, Germany's first freely elected parliament met and offered the crown of Germany to the king of Prussia, who refused it. In 1861, the first moves towards a united Germany were as Wilhelm I became king of Prussia and made Otto von Bismark chancellor. Prussia declared war on Denmark, Austria and France. Prussia was victorious in all three wars, making the unification of Germany possible.
  • Revolutions of 1848

    Revolutions of 1848
    Revolutions of 1848, series of republican revolts against European monarchies, beginning in Sicily and spreading to France, Germany, Italy, and the Austrian Empire. They all ended in failure and repression and were followed by widespread disillusionment among liberals.
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    French Second Republic

    The French Second Republic was a short-lived republican government of France under President Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte. It lasted from the 1848 Revolution to the 1851 coup by which the president made himself Emperor Napoleon III and initiated the Second Empire.
  • Invention of the Bessemer converter

    Invention of the Bessemer converter
    The Bessemer converter made it possible to manufracture steel (an alloy of iron and carbon). This was a more flexible material, ideal for constructing machinery, tools, buildings and public works.
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    Italian Unification process

    In 1859, the liberal monarchy of Piedmont-Sardinia governed by Prime Minister Cavour, started a unification process. They declared war on Austria and annexed Lombardy. At the same time, a popular upsrings led by Garibaldi overthrew the absolute monarchies in central and southern Italiy. In 1861, Victor Manuel II of Savoy was proclaimed king. In 1866, Austria left Venetia, and in 1870, the papal states were annexed by Itlay. The nwely unified state established its capital in Rome.
  • First International

    First International
    he International Association of Workers or First International of the workers, was an organization founded from London in 1864 that brought together the English unionists, French and Italian republican anarchists and socialists. His fines were the political organization of the proletariat in Europe and the rest of the world, as well as a forum for examining common problems and proposing lines of action. Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels and Mikhail Bakunin collaborated on it.
  • Karl Marx publishes Das Kapital

    Karl Marx publishes Das Kapital
    Das Kapital, one of the major works of the 19th-century economist and philosopher Karl Marx, in which he expounded his theory of the capitalist system, its dynamism, and its tendencies toward self-destruction. He described his purpose as to lay bare “the economic law of motion of modern society.”
  • Second International

    Second International
    In 1889, the Marxists founded the Second International to coordinate the various solcialist parties. The Second International established some identity symbols of the labour movement, such as the anthem ' The Internationale' and the 1 May holiday (International Workers' day)