medival times

  • 500

    Clovis

    Clovis
    Was a strong military leader who became the first germanic ruler to convert to Christianity. By 510 he had established the powerful Frankish kingdom. The kingdom strechted from the Pyrenees in the southwest to German lands in the east which is modern day France.
  • 527

    Emperor Justinian

    Emperor Justinian
    Was Emperor of the Eastern Roman Empire in 527. He wanted to reestablish the Roman Empire in the entire Mediterranean world. By 552 it had seemed his goal was acheived. He died in 565 when the Lombards had conquered much of Italy.
  • 527

    Byzantine Empire

    Byzantine Empire
    In the fith century germanic tribes headed to the western part of the Roman Empire. The empire was both a greek and a christian state. Greek was the the commom langauge. The main language then became latin later in time.
  • Jan 1, 622

    Prophet Muhammad

    Prophet Muhammad
    Muhammad was a political and spiritual leader to Islam, who was born in mecca to a merchant family. During his prayer he was visited by the Angel Gabriel. The revelations that the angel brought to him were recorded in the Quran. Muhammad then fled Mecca to Medina to avoid persecution from polytheistic Arabs.
  • Jan 1, 622

    Hijrah

    Hijrah
    This was the journey that Muhammad and his followers took to Madinah. Madinah is where him and some of his closest followers moved from Yathrib.
  • Jan 2, 636

    Abu Bakr

    Abu Bakr
    Abu Bakr was the Prophet Muhammad's father-in-law. He was named Caliph (successor) after the death of Muhammad. The Arab empires began under Bakr's leadership.
  • Jan 1, 661

    Umayyads

    Umayyads
    The Umayyads were led by Mu'awiyah. he created the Caliphate or office of the Caliph. The empire moved the Capitol of Madina to Damascus, Syria. It spread throughout North Africa and into Spain.
  • Jan 3, 661

    Damascus

    Damascus
    Became the capital in the Umayyad Empire. Captial was moved by the Caliph Mu'awiyah from Madinah to Damascus, Syria
  • Jan 1, 742

    Charlemagne

    Charlemagne
    King of the Franks and Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire. Inheriated the kingdom of the Franks when he was 26. In 772 launched the 30-year military campaign.
  • Jan 1, 750

    Abbasid Empire

    Abbasid Empire
    The Abbasid Empire was the Golden age of the Arab Empires and also the center of trade. Caliph Harun al-RAshid embraced the Arts and Literature .The capital was moved from Damascus to Baghdad. Abu al-Abbas ,as a descendant of the Prophet Muhammad's uncle.
  • Jan 1, 762

    Baghdad

    Baghdad
    Made the Capital during the Abbasid empire by the Abbasids. current day capital of Iraq
  • Sep 18, 814

    Feudalism

    Feudalism
    Created after the death of Charlemagne. Rulers found it hard to defend their subjects against the invaders such as Vikings. people then instead started to turn to local landed aristocrats, or nobles.
  • Jan 1, 962

    The Holy Roman Empire

    The Holy Roman Empire
    The powerful dukes of the Saxons became king in eastern Frankish kingdom. This area became known as Germany. The kings tried to rule over italian and german land.
  • Jan 1, 973

    Cario

    Cario
    Capital of present day Eygpt. was made the Capital for the Fatimids during their reign in the Abbasid Empire.
  • Jan 1, 1050

    Crusades

    Crusades
    The crusades is a holy war. The Religious Goal was to recapture the holy land, military goal to stop Muslim attacks on the Byzantine Empire, political goal demonstrate how the Catholic Church was stronger than the Orthodox Church
  • Jan 1, 1055

    Seljuk Turks

    Seljuk Turks
    The Seljuk Turks were originally hired by the Fatimid Dynasty. Before converting to Islam they were nomadic people. The Turks became more and more powerful through the reign and eventually conquered Baghdad. They highly prospered in the Abbasid Empire. Sultan became their political leader while the Cailph became the spirtitual leader.
  • Oct 14, 1066

    William of Normandy

    William of Normandy
    He lead a heavy army of knights to defeat King Harold at the battle of Hastings. He was then crowned king of England and he combined Aglo-saxon and Norman to create a New England.
  • Oct 14, 1066

    Battle of Hastings

    Battle of Hastings
    This was a battle between William of Normandy and King Harolds armies on the coast of England with an end result of William of Normandy winning and being crowned king of England.
  • Jan 1, 1204

    King John

    King John
    He was known as unpopular King John. He led England into losing wars, increased taxes, arrested opponents at free will. The result was that he was forced by the nobles to sign a document called the Magna Carta to change the way he was being kings.
  • Jun 1, 1215

    Magna Carta

    Magna Carta
    This document was the nobles response to King John's awful rule. It said the king must obey the laws or he could be removed from power, he must consult nobles before raising taxes, cant take peoples provate property, leave the church matters to the pope,due process of law, and trial by jury. Two big things also came from the Magna Carta. Habeas corpus is when a person cant be held in jail without consent of court. also independent Judiciary is that the judges be free of royal control
  • Jan 1, 1258

    The Mongols in the Middle East

    The Mongols in the Middle East
    They were a nomadic civilization. Kublai Khan' s brother Hulegu destroyed Baghdad. He hated the Muslims. Mongols rulers intermarried with the Arabs and converted to Islam. The Arab empire collapsed and Islamic civilazation moved to Egypt.
  • Jan 1, 1347

    The Black Death

    The Black Death
    Killed many Europeans. Starting in China and working its way to Europe by trade. Carried by fleas living on black rats carried over by merchant ships.
  • Sep 18, 1480

    Spanish Inquisition

    Spanish Inquisition
    In order to increase the power of Christianity in Spain, Queen Isabella and the Church established the Inquisition in order to suppress and eliminate any heretics in Spain. People suspected of heresy could be questioned and tortured for weeks and then once they confessed they were burned at the stake. Hundreds of thousands were burnt at the stake and at least 150,000 left the