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Medieval Times

  • 330

    Byzantine Empire

    Byzantine Empire
    The Byzantine Empire was the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centred on the capital of Constantinople. It is also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire.
  • 509

    Clovis

    Clovis
    He was the first King of the Franks to unite all the Frankish tribes under one ruler, changing the leadership from a group of royal chieftains, to rule by kings, ensuring that the kingship was held by his heirs. He was also the first Catholic King to rule over Gaul, known today as France.
  • 527

    Emperor Justinian

    Emperor Justinian
    He was Byzantine Emperor from 527 to 565. During his reign, Justinian sought to revive the Empire's greatness and reconquer the lost western half of the classical Roman Empire. Justinian's rule constitutes a distinct epoch in the history of the Eastern Roman Empire. The impact of his administration extended far beyond the boundaries of his time and domain
  • 570

    The birth of the Prophet Muhammad

    The birth of the Prophet Muhammad
    He was born in Mecca. His father died before his birth. His mother died shortly after. He was born in a merchant family. While praying he received the revelations from God from the Angel Gabriel. These revelations were later recorded in the Quran. He was the political and spiritual leader.
  • Jun 21, 622

    Hijrah

    Hijrah
    It was the journey that Muhammad and Bakr made from Mecca to Medina. Muhammad left Mecca because his life was threatedned.
  • Sep 13, 632

    Abu Bakr becomes the caliph

    Abu Bakr becomes the caliph
    Abu Bakr was a trusted advisor and close friend to Muhammad. He became the caliph after the death of Muhammad. The expansion of the the Arab empires began under Bakr's leadership.
  • Sep 13, 661

    Umayyads

    Umayyads
    Led by Mu'awiyah. It created the office of the Caliph knows as the Caliphate. They moved their capitol from Madina ro Damascus in Syria. During their reign, the Arab empire spreaded throughout North Africa and into Spain.
  • Sep 14, 661

    Center of Muslim World: Damascus

    Center of Muslim World: Damascus
    It was chosen as the capital of the Umayyad Caliphate from 661 to 750. Damascus saw a political decline throughout the Abbasid era.
  • Sep 14, 742

    Charlemagne

    Charlemagne
    Founder of the Carolingian Empire. He expanded the Frankish kingdom adding Italy, subduing the Saxons and Bavarians and pushing his frontier into Spain. Charlemagne was the first Emperor in Western Europe since the fall of the Roman Empire four centuries earlier.
  • Sep 13, 750

    Abbasid

    Abbasid
    The Abbasid Dynasty was the center of trade. They were the third islamic caliphates. During their rule, the Arab empire had its golden times. Their capitol moved from Damascus to Baghdad.
  • Sep 14, 762

    Center of Muslim World: Baghdad

    Center of Muslim World: Baghdad
    In 762 A.D. the Abbasid dynasty took over rule of the vast Muslim world and moved the capital to the newly-founded city of Baghdad. Over the next five centuries, the city would become the world's center of education and culture. This period of glory has become known as the Islamic Golden Age, when scholars of the Muslim world made important contributions in the sciences and humanities, including medicine, mathematics, astronomy
  • Sep 14, 800

    Feudalism

    Feudalism
    Feudalism was a set of legal and military customs in medieval Europe that flourished between the 9th and 15th centuries, which, broadly defined, was a system for structuring society around relationships derived from the holding of land in exchange for service or labour.
  • Sep 13, 909

    Seljuk Turks

    Seljuk Turks
    They were hired by the Fatimid Dynasty. They were nomadic people that converted to Islam and prospered in the Abbasid Empire. They slowly began to grow more powerful and eventually conquered Baghdad. The Sultan (holder of power) became the political leader and the Caliph became the spiritual leader.
  • Sep 19, 962

    Holy Roman Empire

    Holy Roman Empire
    The Holy Roman Empire was a varying complex of lands[2] that existed from 962 to 1806 in Central Europe.[3] Its character changed during the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period, when the power of the emperor gradually weakened in favour of the princes. In its last centuries, it had become quite close to a union of territories.
  • Sep 14, 969

    Center of the Muslim World: Cairo

    Center of the Muslim World: Cairo
    Islamic Cairo was founded in 969 as the royal enclosure for the Fatimid caliphs while the actual economic and administrative capital was in nearby Fustat.
  • Sep 19, 1050

    Crusades

    Crusades
    The Crusades were a series of religious expeditionary wars blessed by Pope Urban II and the Catholic Church, with the stated goal of restoring Christian access to the holy places in and near Jerusalem. Jerusalem was and is a sacred city and symbol of all three major Abrahamic faiths (Judaism, Christianity and Islam).[1] The background to the Crusades was set when the Seljuk Turks decisively defeated the Byzantine army in 1071 and cut off Christian access to Jerusalem. The Byzantine emperor, Alex
  • Sep 14, 1066

    William of Normandy

    William of Normandy
    He was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. He had been Duke of Normandy since 1035 under the title of William II. After a long struggle to establish his power, by 1060 his hold on Normandy was secure, and he launched the Norman conquest of England in 1066. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands and by difficulties with his eldest son.
  • Oct 14, 1066

    Battle 0f Hastings

    Battle 0f Hastings
    between the Norman-French army of Duke William II of Normandy and the English army under King Harold II.[a] It took place at Senlac Hill, approximately 10 km (61⁄4 miles) northwest of Hastings, close to the present-day town of Battle, East Sussex, and was a decisive Norman victory.
  • Mar 12, 1088

    Pope Urban II

    Pope Urban II
    Blessed Pope Urban II (ca. 1042 – 29 July 1099), born Otho de Lagery, was pope from 12 March 1088 until his death on 29 July 1099. He is best known for starting the First Crusade (1096–1099) and setting up the modern-day Roman Curia in the manner of a royal court to help run the Church.
  • Dec 24, 1166

    King John

    King John
    John, the youngest of five sons of King Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine, was at first not expected to inherit significant lands. Following the failed rebellion of his elder brothers between 1173 and 1174, however, John became Henry's favourite child. He was appointed the Lord of Ireland in 1177 and given lands in England and on the continent. John's elder brothers William, Henry and Geoffrey died young
  • Sep 13, 1206

    The Mongols in the Middle East

    The Mongols in the Middle East
    They were a nomadic civilization. Genghis Khan became the proclaimed ruler of the Mongols in 1206. Over time Mongol rulers intermarried with the Arabs and converted to Islam.
  • Jun 15, 1215

    Magna Carta

    Magna Carta
    Magna Carta, also called Magna Carta Libertatum or The Great Charter of the Liberties of England, is an Angevin charter, originally issued in Latin in the year 1215, translated into vernacular-French as early as 1219,[1] and reissued later in the 13th century in modified versions. The later versions excluded the most direct challenges to the monarch's authority that had been present in the 1215 charter. The charter first passed into law in 1225; the 1297 version, with the long title (originally
  • Sep 14, 1258

    Golden Age of Islamic Society

    Golden Age of Islamic Society
    The Abbasid historical period is considered the Islamic Golden Age. During this period the Muslim world became an intellectual for science, philosophy, medicine and education.
  • Sep 19, 1348

    The Black Death

    The Black Death
    The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, peaking in Europe between 1348 and 1350. The Black Death originated in or near China and spread by way of the Silk Road or by ship.It may have reduced world population from an estimated 450 million to between 350 and 375 million in 1400.
  • Sep 27, 1480

    Spanish Inquisition

    Spanish Inquisition
    The Tribunal of the Holy Office of the Inquisition (Spanish: Tribunal del Santo Oficio de la Inquisición), commonly known as the Spanish Inquisition (Inquisición española), was a tribunal established in 1480 by Catholic Monarchs, Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile. It was intended to maintain Catholic orthodoxy in their kingdoms, and to replace the Medieval Inquisition which was under Papal control. It became the most substantive of the three different manifestations of the wider C