World History

  • The Gunpowder Plot

    The Gunpowder Plot
    A group of men attempted to blow up King James and his parliament by putting barrels of gunpowder in the cellar. The attempt failed and the men were caught
  • Execution of King Charles I

    Execution of King Charles I
    King Charles was executed by beheading when he was accused of being a tyrant and overthrowing the rights and liberties of his people by the High Court of Justice.
  • Publication of Hobbe’s “Leviathon”

    Publication of Hobbe’s “Leviathon”
    Thomas Hobbes was one of the most well known enlightenment philosophers. He was born in 1588 and died in 1679. He published he most well known book, Leviathon, in 1651. This book was about the structure of society and legitimate government.
  • The Common Wealth

    The Common Wealth
    Under the common wealth, Cromwell was the ruler. He did not have a lot of support. He was especially hated by the monarchy supporters and extreme puritans. He did many things to try to help “purify” the church, such as banning almost everything that was considered fun. He got rid of parliament and created a government called protectorate. He made himself a military dictator. His rule ended In 1658 when he died.
  • The Restoration

    The Restoration
    After the common wealth ended, Parliament restored the monarchy by inviting Charles Stuart, the son of King Charles 1 to be king. Parliament continued to try to limit the power of the monarchy. Parliament made several new laws that would limit the power of the king.
  • Rule of William and Mary

    Rule of William and Mary
    William and Mary, Mary the daughter of King James II, we’re invited by parliament to rule England. Parliament wanted them to overthrow king James II because they were Protestant and he was Catholic. William brought an army and James fled to France.
  • Publication of Locke’s “Two Treatises of Government”

    Publication of Locke’s “Two Treatises of Government”
    John Locke was Avery infuential enlightenment thinker. Many of his works focused on the government. His is known as the father of “liberalism”. His book mainly focuses on his view that an absolute monarchy is wrong. He published this book anonymously.
  • Invention of the Spinning Jenny

    Invention of the Spinning Jenny
    The spinning Jenny was invented by James Hargreaves. This new invention had a multi-spindle spinning frame. This technology industrialized textile manufacturing in the 1700s.
  • John Newton writes Amazing Grace

    John Newton writes Amazing Grace
    John Newton was the captain of a slave ship for a while. He felt extremely remorseful however, and composed amazing grace after this. The song is still widely known and very popular as a Christian hymn.
  • The Storming of the Bastille

    The Storming of the Bastille
    Revolutionaries decided to storm this prison. They saw it as a symbol of the monarchy’s abuse of its power. The Bastille was captured and thus, the Revolution begins.
  • Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen

    Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen
    The National Assembly issued this document. It was greatly inspired by the US Declaration of Independence. The main writers were a Thomas Jefferson and Marquis de Lafayette.
  • The Women’s March to Versailles

    The Women’s March to Versailles
    Women in the market were rioting over bread. The mob eventually grew into thousands. The women ransacked the city armory for weapons and marched to Versailles to capture the royal family.
  • The Execution of King Louis XVI

    The Execution of King Louis XVI
    The National Convention convicted King Louis of treason. A vote among the people was taken and almost everyone voted that he was guilty. King Louis, However, still claimed innocence. He was executed by the royal executioner.
  • Invention of the Cotton Gin

    Invention of the Cotton Gin
    The cotton Gin was invented by Eli Whitney. Its purpose was to separate the cotton from its seeds. This made slavery more effective and actually worsened it.
  • Napoleon Crowns Himself Emperor

    Napoleon Crowns Himself Emperor
    At Norte Dame, in Paris, Napoleon held his coronation ceremony. It was done in front of the Pope and he crowned himself. The people of France greatly approved of Napoleon at this time.
  • The Battle of Borodino

    The Battle of Borodino
    Napoleon’s troops invaded Russia and found an empty, burning city. They then fought the Russian army. Out of 250,000 troops, 68,000 died in battle. This was the bloodiest of the Napoleonic wars. On the way back to France, winter hit hard and killed almost half of the remaining soldiers.
  • Napoleon Exiled to St. Helena

    Napoleon Exiled to St. Helena
    After escaping his first exile in Elba, Napoleon gathered troops and fought at Waterloo against Britain. Napoleon lost and the rest of Europe decided to get rid of him for good. They sent him to the Island of St. Helena in the middle of the Atlantic.
  • Reform Bill of 1832

    Reform Bill of 1832
    The reform bill’s purpose was to allow more people in England to be allowed to vote. However, the bill really only broadened that number by 1%. The bill also gave representation to small cities.
  • The Factory Act of 1833

    The Factory Act of 1833
    The factory act made working conditions better for children. It limited the amount of hours a day that they could work per age.
  • Slavery Abolition Act of 1833

    Slavery Abolition Act of 1833
    This act was strongly championed for by William Wilberforce, a parliament member and strong abolitionist. The act completely emancipated slaves and gave them more rights.
  • Queen Victoria is Corrinated

    Queen Victoria is Corrinated
    Queen Victoria was only a teenager when she was corrinated as the Queen of the entire British Empire. She was very well educated and a great leader. She inspired many trends and traditions. She died at an old age and until the rule of queen Elizabeth II she was the longest living Monarch.
  • The Invention of the Telegraph

    The Invention of the Telegraph
    The telegraph was invented by Samuel F. B. Morse. This worked by transmitting electrical signals between wires. Its purpose was to communicate over long distances.
  • The Irish Potato Famine

    The Irish Potato Famine
    An airborne fungus was accidentally introduced to the Irish region, where potatoes were their staple food. This fungus caused the potatoes to shrivel up and turn brown. Because there, we’re barely any potatoes to eat, many people starved and died.
  • The Crystal Palace Exibition

    The Crystal Palace Exibition
    The crystal palace was built to show off the inventions of the English. It was the largest enclosed place in the world at the time. It had more than 300,000 panes of glass and it burned down in 1936.
  • The opening of the Necropolis Train

    The opening of the Necropolis Train
    In the mid 19th century, death rates rose greatly as disease increased. London was so populated and crowded that no space remained to bury people. The necropolis train ran to a cemetery outside of the city to make more room.
  • The Sepoy Mutiny

    The Sepoy Mutiny
    Sepoys were Indian Soldiers. A rumor got around that the ammo cartridges they ripped open with their teeth were sealed with animal fat. This was a problem because many Indian religions believe some animals to be sacred or unclean. The sepoy soldiers marched to Delhi and restored Mughal Emperor to power. The British took back over the next year. British government ruled India from 1858 to 1947
  • The Meiji Revolt/Restoration

    The Meiji Revolt/Restoration
    A group of Shi-Shi samauri believed that emperor was a God and that he should rule instead of the Shogun. They believed Japan was sacred ground and they were mad at the Shogun for signing treaties with the west. The emperor made many military and social reforms.
  • Stanley Finds Livingstone

    Stanley Finds Livingstone
    Henry Stanley travels to the interior of Africa to find Dr. Livingstone who has gone missing. Stanley comes across a village and there find Livingstone, greeting him with the famous words, “Dr. Livingstone I presume.”
  • The First Telephone Call

    The First Telephone Call
    In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell invented the first telephone. His first call was famously recorded.
  • Thomas Edison Invents the Lightbulb

    Thomas Edison Invents the Lightbulb
    Thomas Edison was a great inventor. He invented hundreds of things we still use today. Among some of his greatest inventions was the lightbulb, which used electricity.
  • Opening of the Eiffel Tower

    Opening of the Eiffel Tower
    The Eiffel Tower was built in 1889 as the entrance to the World fair. It was constructed by Stephen Sauvestre. It was only supposed to be up temporarily but after adding a radio antenna, they decided to leave it up because it was now useful.
  • Dreyfus is Pardoned by the French President

    Dreyfus is Pardoned by the French President
    Alfred Dreyfus was convicted of spying on the French for the Germans. Even though he was innocent, he was convicted because he was Jewish. After several trials and lots of work, he was still found guilty, but the president pardoned him.
  • The Boxer Rebellion

    The Boxer Rebellion
    The Boxers were a Chinese anti foreigner society. They wanted to stop the westernization of China. Foreign troops tried to subdue the boxers, but they went on a rampage, killing many foreigners and Christians. It was estimated that over 100,000 people were killed.
  • The Treaty of Portsmouth

    The Treaty of Portsmouth
    The Russo-Japanese war was ended by the Treaty of Portsmouth. This treaty was mediated by president Theodore Rosevelt who won the Nobel peace prize for this.
  • Henry Ford Invents the Model T

    Henry Ford Invents the Model T
    As automobiles started becoming more popular, Henry Ford had the idea to make them more affordable and more practical. He famously said that anyone could have any color car as long as it’s black.
  • The Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

    The Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand
    Franz Ferdinand of Austria was next in line to the throne. He and his wife were killed by a Serbian. This was the main event that lead to The Great War.
  • The Christmas Truce.

    The Christmas Truce.
    Curing the first year of World War One, French and German soldiers came out of their trenches and started singing. They made a truce and celebrated together, smoking, drinking, and playing soccer all Christmas Day. They went back to fighting the next day.
  • The Execution of Edith Cavell

    The Execution of Edith Cavell
    Edith Cavell was a British nurse. She saved the lives of soldiers on both sides of the war. She was accused of treason by the Germans and a firing squad killed her. This caused major worldwide press coverage.
  • The Zimmerman Telegram is Intercepted

    The Zimmerman Telegram is Intercepted
    Germany tried to send a telegram to Mexico saying that if the joined the Central powers, Germany would give them American land. The British intercepted this and told America. This was the main event that pushed America to join the Allied powers.
  • Russia Exits the War

    Russia Exits the War
    After fighting for three years, the Russian troops were in poor condition. Russia did not have enough strength to keep fighting so they signed a treaty with the central powers to no longer be involved in the war.
  • Armistice is Declared

    Armistice is Declared
    A treaty was signed for all sides to cease fire. Many troops did not get the notice, or did not obey and some people kept fighting vpeven after.
  • The Treaty of Versailles is Signed

    The Treaty of Versailles is Signed
    The treaty of Versailles was signed in the hall of mirrors in then palace of Versailles. It was signed by the leaders of Britain, America, France, and Italy. No Germans were allowed to have a say in the terms and conditions. Two were there and forced to sign it. Many of the countries did not get what they wanted which is part of what lead to World War Two.