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1450 C.E - 1750 C.E.

  • Apr 1, 1419

    Prince Henry The Navigator

    Prince Henry The Navigator
    rince Henry (Henrique) the Navigator (1394-1460) was a Portuguese royal prince, soldier, and patron of explorers. Henry sent many sailing expeditions down Africa's west coast, but did not go on them himself. Thanks to Prince Henry's patronage, Portuguese ships sailed to the Madeira Islands (Joao Goncalves Zarco, 1420), rounded Cape Bojador (Eannes, 1434), sailed to Cape Blanc (Nuno Tristao, 1441), sailed around Cap Vert (1455), and went as far as the Gambia River (Cadamosto, 1456) and Cape Palma
  • Mar 31, 1441

    Portuguese Slave Trade

    Portuguese Slave Trade
    Portugal started slave trade in Africa when Prince Henry the Navigator sent an expedition to explore Africa in 1441. In 1444 a cargo of 235 enslaved Africans were brought back to Portugal.
  • Apr 1, 1450

    Ottoman Dynasty

    Ottoman Dynasty
    The Ottoman Dynasty (or the Imperial House of Osman), ruled the Ottoman Empire from 1299 to 1922, beginning with Osman I (not counting his father, Ertug(rul), though the dynasty was not proclaimed until Orhan Bey declared himself sultan.
    Before that the tribe/dynasty might have been known as Sög(üt but was renamed Osmanli (Ottoman in English) in honour of Osman.
    The sultan was the sole and absolute regent, head of state and head of government of the empire, at least officially, though often much
  • Apr 1, 1450

    Songhay Empire

    Songhay Empire
    The Songhai had settled on both banks of the middle Niger River. They established a state in the 15th century, which unified a large part of the western Sudan and developed into a brilliant civilisation. It was ruled by the dynasty or royal family of Sonni from the thirteenth century to the late fifteenth century. The capital was at Gao, a city surrounded by a wall. It was a great cosmopolitan market place where kola nuts, gold, ivory, slaves, spices, palm oil and precious woods were traded
  • Apr 1, 1451

    Reign Of Mehmed The Conqueror

    Reign Of Mehmed The Conqueror
    Upon the death of Murad II in 1451, Mehmed II entered upon his second reign, which was destined to become world-renowned.
    Ottoman tradition called for a new sultan to initiate his reign with a great Ghazi conquest. For Mehmed II his ghazi goal was obvious – Constantinople. Speaking to his followers, urging them to press on with their siege of the imperial city, Mehmed II told them that Holy War was their basic duty as it had been for their forefathers. But the risk of failure was high the young
  • Apr 1, 1464

    Reign Of Sunni Ali

    Reign Of Sunni Ali
    Sonni ʿAlī, Sonni also spelled Sunni, also called Sonni ʿAlī Ber (Arabic: ʿAlī the Great) (died 1492), West African monarch who initiated the imperial expansion of the Western Sudanese kingdom of Songhai. His conquest of the leading Sudanese trading cities established the basis for Songhai’s future prosperity and expansion.
  • Mar 31, 1487

    Dias' Voyage Into Indian Ocean

    Dias' Voyage Into Indian Ocean
    Bartolomeu Dias in August 1487 on the authority of Portuguese King John II set sail to explore the coast of Africa and find a way to the Indian Ocean. It was in this voyage that Dias discovered the Cape of Good Hope at the southern tip of Africa.
  • Mar 31, 1492

    Columbus' First Voyage

    Columbus' First Voyage
    Christopher Columbus’s first voyage began on August 3, 1492 with the funding of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella.
  • Apr 1, 1494

    Treaty Of Tordesillas

    Treaty Of Tordesillas
    Treaty of Tordesillas, (June 7, 1494), agreement between Spain and Portugal aimed at settling conflicts over lands newly discovered or explored by Christopher Columbus and other late 15th-century voyagers.
  • Apr 1, 1502

    Safavid Dynasty

    Safavid Dynasty
    After the disastrous invasion of Mongols, in the 1200s, migrated Turks and Mongolian tribes adopted the Persian customs and even language. In the 1300s, the Ilkhanids, a dynasty founded by the "Genghis Khan's" grandson, Holagu Khan, had been an influential factor in Persia. During these turbulent years of 13th century, the Persians had submerged themselves deeper in Islamic devotion and Sufism.
  • Mar 31, 1517

    Martin Luther

    Martin Luther
    Luther was a German monk, Catholic priest, professor of theology and seminal figure of a reform movement in 16th century Christianity, subsequently known as the Protestant Reformation.He strongly disputed the claim that freedom from God's punishment for sin could be purchased with monetary values. He confronted indulgence salesman Johann Tetzel, a Dominican friar, with his Ninety-Five Theses in 1517. His refusal to retract all of his writings at the demand of Pope Leo X in 1520 and the HRE.
  • Apr 1, 1519

    Spanish Conquest Of Mexico

    Spanish Conquest Of Mexico
    The story of the conquest of the Aztec Empire by a small band of Spanish conquistadors and their Indian allies is one of the most famous episodes from history. It is well known not only for its historical significance, but also for its outrageous and hair-raising feats of derring-do. Hernando Cortez, acting essentially on his own, with an army of only about 500 men overthrew the wealthiest, most sophisticated, and most powerful empire on the American continent.
  • Apr 1, 1520

    Reign Of Suleyman The Magnificent

    Reign Of Suleyman The Magnificent
    Suleiman I (or Suleyman), "the Magnificent", Ottoman Sultan, succeeded his father Selim I in 1520. His birth coincided with the opening year of the 10th century of Muslim chronology (AH 900), the most glorious period in the history of Islam. Eventful as the age was both in Europe, where the Renaissance was in full growth, and in India, where the splendor of the emperor Akbar's reign exceeded alike that of his predecessors and his successors, Suleiman's conquests overshadowed all these.
  • Mar 31, 1526

    Mughal Dynasty

    Mughal Dynasty
    Mughal dynasty, Mughal also spelled Mogul, Arabic Mongol, Muslim dynasty of Turkic-Mongol origin that ruled most of northern India from the early 16th to the mid-18th century, after which it continued to exist as a considerably reduced and increasingly powerless entity until the mid-19th century.
  • Mar 31, 1530

    John Calvin

    John Calvin
    John Calvin was an influential French theologian and pastor during the Protestant Reformation. He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism. Originally trained as a humanist lawyer, he broke from the Roman Catholic Church around 1530.
  • Mar 31, 1534

    Foundation Of Society Of Jesus

    Foundation Of Society Of Jesus
    An order of regular clergy, founded by Saint Ignatius of Loyola in 1534, that is strongly committed to education, theological scholarship, and missionary work.
  • Apr 1, 1542

    Reign Of Akbar

    Reign Of Akbar
    Born on October 15, 1542 in Umarkot, India, and enthroned at age 14, Akbar the Great began his military conquests under the tutelage of a regent before claiming imperial power and expanding the Mughal Empire. Known as much for his inclusive leadership style as for his war mongering, Akbar ushered in an era of religious tolerance and appreciation for the arts. Akbar the Great died in 1605.
  • Mar 31, 1545

    Council Of Trent

    Council Of Trent
    The Council of Trent of the Roman Catholic Church (1545-1563) played a vital role in the revitalization of the Roman Catholic Church in Europe.
  • Mar 31, 1564

    Galileo Galilei

    Galileo Galilei
    Born on February 15, 1564, in Pisa, Italy, Galileo Galilei was a mathematics professor who made pioneering observations of nature with long-lasting implications for the study of physics.
  • Apr 1, 1572

    Reign Of Emperor Wanli

    Reign Of Emperor Wanli
    The Wanli emperor was a recluse whose apparent inattention to government affairs contributed to the abuses of power by provincial officials and other political figures that came to dominate that era of Chinese history. The violence and corruption among leaders of the northern provinces led to much popular dissatisfaction and unrest, preparing the way for the invasion from the north by the Manchu, who subsequently conquered all of China and established the Qing dynasty (1644–1911/12).
  • Spanish Armada

    Spanish Armada
    The Spanish Armada sailed from Spain in July 1588. The Spanish Armada's task was to overthrow protestant England lead by Queen Elizabeth I. The Spanish Armada proved to be an expensive disaster for the Spanish but for the English it was a celebrated victory making Sir Francis Drake even more of a hero than he already was and even having an impact on Tudor Christmas celebrations!
  • Tokugawa Shogunate

    Tokugawa Shogunate
    The Tokugawa shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府?) and the Edo bakufu (江戸幕府?),[1] was a feudal regime of Japan established by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family.[2] This period is known as the Edo period and gets its name from the capital city, Edo, which now is called Tokyo. The Tokugawa shogunate ruled from Edo Castle from 1603 until 1868, when it was abolished during the Meiji Restoration.
  • Peace Of Westphalia

    Peace Of Westphalia
    The Thirty Years War was ended by the Peace of Westphalia which was referred to as the "Peace of Exhaustion" by contemporaries. The Peace of Westphalia was not one specific treaty but rather a collection of treaties commonly linked by the fact that they brought the Thirty Years War to an end.
  • Thirty Years War

    Thirty Years War
    Thirty Years’ War, (1618–48), in European history, a series of wars fought by various nations for various reasons, including religious, dynastic, territorial, and commercial rivalries. Its destructive campaigns and battles occurred over most of Europe, and, when it ended with the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648, the map of Europe had been irrevocably changed.
  • John Locke

    John Locke
    John Locke was born on August 29th, 1632 in England and lived to became one of the most influential people in England and, perhaps, one of the most influential people of the 17th century. Before his death on October 28th, 1704 he would earn the title as the Father of liberal philosophy. His ideas would also be used as a keystone for the revolution of the North American colonies from England.
  • Qing Dynasty

    Qing Dynasty
    Before Qing's establishment, there was a regime called 'Latter Jin' that had been set up by Nurhachu, leader of the Man Ethnic Minority. Actually, Man people were the offspring of the Nuzhen people who had always been living in Northeast China. After reunifying all the Nuzhen tribes, Nurhachu proclaimed himself emperor in 1616. Thus a new regime called Latter Jin was founded in Hetu Ala (in current Liaoning Province) during the reign of Emperor Shenzong of the Ming Dynasty (1368 - 1644).
    In 1636
  • Seven Years War

    Seven Years War
    Seven Years’ War, (1756–63), the last major conflict before the French Revolution to involve all the great powers of Europe. Generally, France, Austria, Saxony, Sweden, and Russia were aligned on one side against Prussia, Hanover, and Great Britain on the other. The war arose out of the attempt of the Austrian Habsburgs to win back the rich province of Silesia, which had been wrested from them by Frederick II the Great of Prussia during the War of the Austrian Succession (1740–48).
  • Establishment Of First Colony In Australia

    Establishment Of First Colony In Australia
    The first Australian colony was settled in 1788 by Britain, for the transport of criminals. It was used basically as an old Alcatraz.
  • Haitian Revolution

    Haitian Revolution
    The Haitian Revolution created the second independent country in the Americas after the United States became independent in 1783. U.S. political leaders, many of them slaveowners, reacted to the emergence of Haiti as a state borne out of a slave revolt with ambivalence, at times providing aid to put down the revolt, and, later in the revolution, providing support to Toussaint L’Ouverture’s forces. Due to these shifts in policy and domestic concerns, the United States would not officially recogni
  • End Of British Slave Trade

    End Of British Slave Trade
    Slave Trade Act in 1807 ended Slave Trade but not slavery itself in Britain.