Age of exploration 3

The World at 1450 project period 4

  • 180

    Pax Romana Ends

    Pax Romana Ends
    After the reign of Marcus Aurelius ended, the Pax Romana ended and the Roman Empire started corrupting. In addition, the Roman Empire began declining morally and economically. Rome kept declining until its fall in 476.
    LittB
  • 193

    Didius

    Didius
    Didius Julius died and an end to a short two month horrible excuse for an emperor occured. Didius was an example of a selfish leader of Rome who only cared about himself. Didius was not a natural ruler at all and actually came to power by an auction for the spot which he won. He was announced as emperor but with other more qualified leaders converging on the posisition he was quickly pushed out. Preceeding rulers ended up being less selfish and more helpful to the people.
    EhrlichM
  • 222

    Elagabalus 's disregard to Religion

    Elagabalus 's disregard to Religion
    Elagabalus was the 25th emperor in Rome. He replaced traditional Roman patheon god Jupiter with a lesser god Deos Sol Invitus, he also made the Roman people praise the god, while he led the ceremony. The people became so angry his cousin Alexander Severus assassinated him, in a plot formed by his grandmother on March 11, 222.
  • 284

    284 AD diocletian presents the idea to split the empire

    284 AD diocletian presents the idea to split the empire
    Diocletian split the empire into the east and west on an imaginary line from the Danube River to Dalmatia. He gave the rule of the less wealthy western part to Maximian and kept the richer eastern part for himself. He also split the empire into smaller provinces. These were ruled by governors. Diocletian had to move his capital many times to protect the government from internal and external threats.
    Patrick Foley
  • 284

    Diocletian rises to power

    Diocletian rises to power
    Diocletian rose to power in 284. He divided the empire into two parts, Western and Eastern. Diocletian also started the Christian persecution. Diocletian was emperor until 305.
    ScarlettM
  • 285

    Diocletian splits the Roman Empire

    Diocletian splits the Roman Empire
    Together with his co-emperor, Maximian, Diocletian split the Roman Empire in half. Diocletian took control of the wealthier eastern provinces and left the western provinces under Maximian. This event caused a gap in the empire which would later influence the decline of the Western Empire because it didn't have the resources and wealth it once shared with the east.
    Michael Considine
  • 305

    Constantine becomes first Christian Emperor 305 AD

    Constantine becomes first Christian Emperor  305 AD
    In 305 AD Constantine became the first Christian Emperor. This was a milestone for the Catholic church as Constantine allowed Christians to finally freely practice their religion. He later passed the Edict of Milan which freed the Christian practice from being outlawed.
    ANAESSENS
  • 313

    Edict of Milan

    Edict of Milan
    The Edict of Milan was issued and the persecution of christians stopped. Rome was now united through one religion and Christianity spread. Roman citizens were no longer hurt by the Roman Empire. The Edict of Milan was issued after the Roman emperor Constatine supposedly won a battle because he placed crosses on the shields of the soldiers. After this battle Christianity became the official religion of Rome. EhrlichM
  • 313

    The persecution of christians ends

    The persecution of christians ends
    The Edict of Milan was issued by Constantine in the West Empire and Licinius Augustus is the East Empire. This gave religious freedom to Romans throughout the Roman Empire, thus ending the persecution of Romans. Norbert McGettigan.
  • Period: 313 to 476

    Roman Empire Declines

  • 350

    Kingdom of Askum Defeats Kush

    Kingdom of Askum Defeats Kush
    The kingdom of Aksum defeats Kush. Aksum defeats Kush. Aksum marched on the Kush in a crushing defeat. With this defeat on Kush, Aksum became the most powerful kingdom in East Africa.(Kingdom of Askum)
    By: Shane Davis
  • 350

    Islamic Science and Medicine

    Islamic Science and Medicine
    Islamic ideas about the body were founded on notions of classical Greek philosophy. Islamic anatomical terms differ between several scientist and doctors but all follow the same physical systems. All of Islamic medicine and biological thinking is not only based on Greek philosophy but also is based on the Galen’s system of medicine. This system is based around ideas that are thought to be vital to human life but that is external. The female body was known as gynaecology. By: Shane Davis
  • 361

    Huns

    Huns
    The huns begin to encroach the borders of the roman empire. Connor Waite
  • 380

    Christianity Becomes the Official Religion of Rome

    Christianity Becomes the Official Religion of Rome
    On February 27, 380 Theodosius I made Christianity the official religion of Rome. This is after Christianity grew as pagans converted. This exhibits the expansion of Christianity after the Edict of Milan which made Christianity tolerable in the empire.
    Michael Considine
  • 382

    First Independent Barbarian Nation within Rome

    First Independent Barbarian Nation within Rome
    Sometime in 382, the first independent barbarian nation was made within Rome. After a treaty between the Visigoths and Theodosius I, the Visigoths were given a nation within the Roman territory. This is a sign of the weakening of Rome do to the migration of Germanic tribes.
    Michael Considine
  • 395

    Death of Theodosius

    In 395, after the death of Theodosius I, the Roman Empire is split in half for the last time O'hara, L
  • 395

    Death of Theodosius

    Death of Theodosius
    The death of Theodosius occured in the year 395 in Milan. He is remembered mostly for taking in the religion of Christianity. He is also known for splitting his empire among his two sons, Honorius and Ardcadius. He served most of his life as a military commander.
    SChero
  • 405

    Rome`s loss of power

    Rome lost its grip on Europe
  • 410

    Rome is sacked by Visigoths

    Rome is sacked by Visigoths
  • 434

    Attila and his brother, Bleda, are given leadership over the Huns

    Attila and his brother, Bleda, are given leadership over the Huns
    Sometime in 434, Attila's uncle, the leader of the Huns, was struck by lightning and rule over the Huns was left to Attila and his brother, Bleda. This is important because after Bleda was killed, supposedly by his brother, Attila took complete power over the Huns. Attila would later push through Europe, forcing Germanic tribes into Roman territories.
    Michael Considine
  • 447

    Attila The Hun Attacks Rome

    Attila The Hun Attacks Rome
    Attila The Hun attacks Rome with his army of fearless men. He would gain control of Rome, but he would not find the neccesities he wished for.
    Cameron Stephenson
  • 447

    Attila the Hun Attacks

    Attila the Hun Attacks
    Attila the Hun leads his army to attack and to conquer the lands of Rome.
    KingK
  • 447

    Attila the Hun invades the weakening Empire

    Attila the Hun invades the weakening Empire
    After seeing the widespread suffering of the Roman people due to collapsed economy and over-population, Attila and his men set off to attack Rome and attempt to conquer it. These attacks were one of the final major blows to the collapse of the Empire.
    Alex Alfonsi
  • Period: 450 to Dec 31, 1450

    The World events leading up to 1450

    Students will add events in history that impact the as it stood during the middle of the 15th century.
  • 455

    Vandals Invade Rome - DintinoA

    Vandals Invade Rome - DintinoA
    In 455AD, the Vandals add to Rome's troubles by invading. They come into Rome about 45 years after Alaric and the Visigoths sack Rome.
  • 476

    476 AD Roman empire ends

     476 AD Roman empire ends
    In 476 AD Odoacer beheads the last western Roman emperor and the Dark Ages begin. The Dark Ages are a period of nearly no technoligical, moral, or governmental improvements and a sharp decline of the achievements of the Roman Empire.
    --Murphy, Richard
  • 481

    The Merovingian Dynasty Begins

    The Merovingian Dynasty Begins
    The Merovingian dynasty started with Clovis I in 481 AD. Clovis I united the Frankish Gaul region. Clovis I was the king of the Merovingian kingdom when the kingdom was at it's high point. Clovis I was the best king of all of the rulers in the kingdom. The kingdom began to fall after the death of Clovis I. Other leaders led the country into civil war and a decline in size. The dynasty had no ruler for the last decade of its existence in the mid-8th century.
    ScarlettM
  • 511

    Clovis I dies

    Clovis I dies
    On November 27, 511 Clovis I died. His death brought a division to his empire. His sons fought for power over the vast empire. This caused a great amount of unrest and the country he worked to build crumbled at the greed of his sons. MConsidine
  • 545

    Establishment of Clonmacnoise

    Establishment of Clonmacnoise
    In the year 545 CE, Saint Ciaran established an abbey at Clonmacnoise, located in Ireland. Clonmacnoise was one of the earliest and most important establishments to the religion of Christianity in Europe. Clonmacnoise was placed in between two powerful cities in which they gained much support from each of the kings. The sttlement of Clonmacnoise later became a monastic community and a center for learning, acedemics, and trade.
    NaessensA
  • 548

    Clonmacnoise is founded.

    Clonmacnoise is founded.
    Clonmacnoise is a monastic site overlooking the Shannon River. The ruins include a cathedral, castle, round tower, many churches, two high crosses, and a collection of early Christian graves. The settlement became an important center for religious practice, trade, and politics.
    KingK
  • 575

    Sts. Columba and Columban Monastic movement

    Sts. Columba and Columban Monastic movement
    St. Columba And St. Columban were both successors of St. Patrick. They carried the monastic movement to Scotland, England, Gaul and Italy. With the help of Columba and Columban the Irish monasteries remained at the top of classical preservation until 875 when Viking invasions began. The monastic movement founded about 150 monasteries outside of Ireland. Mason K
  • Period: Dec 21, 600 to Dec 31, 1350

    Project B - World History - Medieval Period Phase 2

    Project B - World History - Medieval Period Phase 2
    1 paragraph, MLA Bib
  • Jan 1, 622

    The Islamic Empire

    The Islamic Empire
    The Isdlamic Empire started in the city of Mecca by the prophet Muhammad. As it beame more popular, Muhammad and his follwers moved to the city of Yathrib in 622. The Empire started out with little threat as the Persian and Byzantine Empires had already been fighting This also made it easy for the Muslims to raid caravans and small towns. It became very important for their culture. The Muslims wanted to aim for larger targets and ended in conquering Byzantine and Persia by 711.
    NaessensA
  • Feb 15, 624

    Muslim Conquest Of Persia

    Muslim Conquest Of Persia
    Cameron Stephenson
    Project B - World History - Medieval Period Phase 21 paragraph, MLA Bib
  • Jan 1, 825

    De mensura orbis terrae

    De mensura orbis terrae
    The De mensura orbis terrae was a book written to describe adventures around the world. Dicuil created this ancient manuscript. In it contained the first documented trip to Iceland where men saw the midnight sun. It also contains a definite account of the freshwater canal between the Red Sea and Nile River. This was a true geographic inovation for his time. EhrlichM
  • Jan 1, 900

    Vassals make Feudalism Possible-Project B

    Vassals make Feudalism Possible-Project B
    In 900 AD, feudalism began in Europe in France after the Normans took control. The King received all the land then he distributed it to his vassals, people who pledged allegiance to a lord. The King gave land to barons and nobles in exchange for money, knights and loyalty. The nobles would then give land to their knights, who passed it onto laborers. Nobles, knights and laborers are all vassals and they were the most important and essential part to feudalism.
    MConsidine
  • Jan 1, 1070

    Start of the 12th Century Renaissance

    *Circa* The 12th century Renaissance brought both econmic and social change to civilization. Movements like Scholasticism and Gothic Architecture arose at this time
    BOHNYK
  • Mar 7, 1081

    Louis VI (Project 2: Phase B)

    Louis VI (Project 2: Phase B)
    Louis VI was the king of France from 1081-1137 and was nicknamed “Louis the Fat”. He succeeded his father, Phillip I. His main duty was to bring the unruly barons, men who owned land, of the royal lands under firm control. Aside from military campaigns, Louis VI was able to prevent his land from being invaded and was a strong supporter of local churches and granted privileges to the people of his towns. He died in 1137, ending his reign as King of France.
    DintinoA
  • Jan 1, 1088

    Founding of the University of Bologna

    Founding of the University of Bologna
    The University of Bologna was one of the first medieval educational institutions established during the Middle Ages. In this university, students had more say in the organization and logistics, unlike today. They determined tuition and curricula for the school. Irnerius, a notable Italian jurist, taught law and liberal arts at the University of Bologna during the eleventh century.
    LittB
  • Feb 8, 1150

    Founding of the University of Paris

    Founding of the University of Paris
    The University of Paris, founded between 1150 and 1175, rose to become one of the best universities in Europe. This school was concerned with Christian theology. Many Catholic icons such as St. Bonaventure and Thomas Aquinas were professors. As a result, the Church played a big factor in this university.
    AlyanakianC
  • Sep 3, 1189

    Coronation of Richard I

    Coronation of Richard I
    This ceremony took place at the Palace of Westminster. At this event, Richard I was crowned King of England. Richard I forbidded and Jewish people from coming to the service or the banquet. This was to protect them from any harm. Unfortunatley, several wealthy Jewish merchants attended the service and baquet anyway. The people created a mob, and all the Jewish merchants were beaten to death with clubs and stones. McgettiganN
  • Sep 7, 1191

    Battle of Arsuf

    Battle of Arsuf
    The battle fought by Richard the lionhearted that solidifieed his reputation as a great soldier. during this battle, Richard marched his army in perfect formation towards the Muslim forces that were led by Saladin. Even when the Muslims were firing volley after volley of arrows, the army still marched in formation while maintaining discipline. When the two armies met, Richard stormed right into the battle and defeated the Muslims.
    FoleyP
  • Jun 28, 1192

    Battle Of Jaffa

    Battle Of Jaffa
    Saladin Attacked the town of Jaffa which sent news to Richard the lionhearted to help. He sailed over to Jaffa and took saladin by surprise. Saladin was forced to withdraw with victory in sight. Andrew Mitchell
  • Jan 8, 1198

    Pope Innocent III Gains Power

    Pope Innocent III Gains Power
    On January 8, 1198, Pope Innocent III becomes the Pope. His launching of the Albigensian Crusade in attempt to protect the Catholic Church against the heretic beliefs of the Cathars is his most lasting achievement. During this time, a countless number of citizens of Languedoc (some who were not Cathars), were brutally murdered. Pope Innocent III over-estimated his enemies and commanded his crusaders to use all force and to kill them all. DintinoA
  • Feb 15, 1200

    The Height of the Champagne Fairs

    The Height of the Champagne Fairs
    The Champagne fairs were the best known fairs of the medieval period. Count Theobald II of Champagne came up with a brilliant idea, to create a central location for trade. It would increase the trade market, and trade would be much easier to do. The Champagne fairs also boomed the Champagne economy; the counts of Champagne were then extremely wealthy due to this ingenious invention of having a central, main location for people to interact with each other to trade.
    KingK
  • Nov 14, 1215

    Fourth Lateran Council

    Fourth Lateran Council
    Pope Innocent III called on religious and secular leaders of Christianity to meet at the Lateran complex in Rome in November 1215. They discussed how to reform the church and get the holy land back. The council however did not have a long term impact as many neglected the actions that were taken at the council. Cameron Stephenson
  • Feb 15, 1225

    Thomas Aquinas

    Thomas Aquinas
    Thomas Aquinas was born 1225 C.E. in Roccasecca, near Aquino in Sicily. He was born in a rich family. His father`s name was the Count Andulf of Aquino. His mother was Countess Theodora of Teano. He recieved a good education from an early age. When he grew older he became a Dominican monk. He became very influencial in philosophy, religion, and ethics. He died March 7, 1274. In 1567, he was pronounced a doctor of the church. WaiteC Waite,Connor
  • Jun 24, 1340

    Battle of Sluys EhrlichM individual work

    Battle of Sluys EhrlichM individual work
    During the Hundred Years War the Battle of Sluys occurred between the English and the French. Soon to be King Edward the third needed to cross the English Channel to claim his right to the throne. The French king Phillip the sixth wanted to stop him. Both sides had different strategizes to naval warfare. One shared idea of the two battle plans was that the ships would be used as mobile fortresses. The English relied heavily on archers which proved to be the defining strategy to be victorious.
  • Feb 15, 1343

    Chaucer is born

    Chaucer is born
    Geoffrey Chaucer may not seem like too common of a name. However, he is actually a very popular poet. He wrote many poems, including the Canterbury Tales, The House of Fame, and The Book of the Duchess. He is commonly known as the father of English Literature during the Middle Ages. He is among the first poets to be buried in the poet's corner of West Minster Abbey
    O'Hara, L
  • Jan 1, 1345

    The Black Death Begins

    The Black Death Begins
    The Black Death began to break out in 1345. This extremely devastating disease began near the Gobi. The Gobi is a desert to the north of China. The disease then spread westward to Europe, the Middle East, and northern Africa destroying thousands of people on the way. Anthony Braun
  • Aug 26, 1346

    The Battle of Crecy FoleyP

    The Battle of Crecy FoleyP
    The Battle of Crecy was a battle during the hundred year war between the English (Edward III) and the French (Philip VI). After the French army attacked Edward and his army and were defeated, Edward marched southeast and terrorized towns in his path to relieve pressure on his men. After Caen fell to Edward, he announced that he will find Philip VI. He then crossed a few rivers and they met at Crecy. Edward defeated the French. After, the English army could no longer be disregarded as an army.
  • Mar 10, 1347

    The Black Death affects all of Asia

    The Black Death affects all of Asia
    By 1347, the Black death had affiliated all of Asia. By this time it was also causing mass death in European countries in cities such as Florence. Some say this was the worst year of the plague due to the death of almost entire cities and towns. Since Florence was such a highly developed, close-cropped area, the plague killed nearly 80% of the population there.
    -MurphyR
  • Dec 1, 1347

    The Black Death spreads through the Mediterranean World

    The Black Death spreads through the Mediterranean World
    The plague which began near the Gobi the spread rapidly. In a course of two short years the Black Death moved all the way across Asia to the Mediterranean. By December 1347, most of northern Africa and southern Europe was afflicted with the plague. Thousands of lives had been lost in those two years and the disease had not even reached its peak. MConsidine
  • Feb 16, 1352

    Black Death ends

    Black Death ends
    The Black Death, or bubonic plague, had finally ended. It lasted for seven years and had a large affect on the whole world. It killed nearly 2/3 of the European population. It affected wages, labors, economy, and social structure. O'Hara, L
  • Feb 10, 1355

    Oxford Riot

    Oxford Riot
    Of the many riots that took place on or near the many campuses of universities, the Oxford riot in 1355 was the worst. On February 10, 1355, St.Scholastica's Day, a riot began in a tavern near the University of Oxford. The riot lasted for 3 days causing many students and townspeople to be killed or seriously wounded. ScarlettM
  • Feb 10, 1355

    Scholastica's Day Riot

    Scholastica's Day Riot
    A riot broke out when a tavern fight continued for three days. This happened at Oxford and many students and civilians were killed. This riot may have started Cambridge and Oxford University.\ CheroS
  • Sep 19, 1356

    Battle of Poitiers

    Battle of Poitiers
    The Battle of Poitiers occured on September 19, 1356. This battle occured during the Hundred Years' War which spanned from 1337 to 1453. This war was fought between the kingdoms of France and England. The English were intending to retreat to Bordeaux, but the French intercepted them. The French fought in waves, but the English successfully defended them. The English won the battle, and captured many nobles and even King John II. After the battle, the English marched to Bordeaux to regroup.
    LittB
  • Period: Feb 14, 1378 to Mar 14, 1417

    1378-1417

    The Great Schism was a seperation in the Church when multiple people were claiming to be pope. When Urban VI was elected and started cracking down on the corrupt bueracracy of the church, a group of French cardinals met in Agnani. There they declared the election of Urban VI as null and elected Clement VII as pope. It took nearly 40 years for this problem to be fixed and it forever weakened the supreme authority of the Church. MurphyR.
  • Jan 1, 1388

    University of Cologne

    University of Cologne
    The University of Cologne was established in 1388. This is one of the oldest known universities ever established. It is thought to have enrolled over 44,000 making it one of the largest universities in Germany. It is still in use today.
    John p
  • Feb 7, 1400

    Languedoc Economy Collapses

    Languedoc Economy Collapses
    By the end of the 14th century, the Albigensian Crusade caused the economy to collapse. By: Shane Davis
  • Apr 4, 1417

    End of Great Schism

     End of Great Schism
    The Great Schism was a seperation in the Church when multiple people were claiming to be pope. When Urban VI was elected and started cracking down on the corrupt bueracracy of the church, a group of French cardinals met in Agnani. There they declared the election of Urban VI as null and elected Clement VII as pope. It took nearly 40 years for this problem to be fixed and it forever weakened the supreme authority the Church had at that time. MurphyR.
  • Jul 3, 1423

    Birth of Louis XI

    Birth of Louis XI
    Louis XI was born at Bourges, France on July 3, 1423 to Charles VII and Marie d'Anjou. Before he became King of France, he tried several times to rebel against his father, all of which failed. When his father died in 1461, he took over the throne. He was nicknamed "The Spider" because he was devious, but also ugly. In 1477, he captured Burgundy after the death of Charles the Bold. He died of a stroke on October 30, 1483, but will always be know as "the founder of the national state of France."
  • Jun 6, 1427

    Prince Henry of Portugal (the Navigator)

    Prince Henry of Portugal (the Navigator)
    Henry the Navigator was an early ruler of the Kingdom of Portugal and an important figure in the early days of the Portuguese Empire. Prince Henry created a school in Portugal centered around the exploration of the surrounding seas. His actions started the early development of European exploration and maritime trade with other continents. ReidP
  • Jan 1, 1453

    Hundred Years War Phase B

    Hundred Years War Phase B
    The Hunded Years War was fought from 13317 to 1453 between the French and English. The conflict started after Charles VI died and the French needed a new king. The French wanted Philip IV as their king. England won most of the battles at the start of the war, but the Black Plague set them both back, along with the cost of the war. The English won the war, but only came away with the land of Calais, because of the Frenchmen's valiant fighting.
    MasonK