The Mughal Empire By Ayesha Zahid VI D

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In History
  • 1526

    Zahīr ud-Dīn Muhammad, Babur

    Zahīr ud-Dīn Muhammad, Babur
    Babur was the founder of the Mughal Empire and first Emperor of the Mughal dynasty in the Indian subcontinent. He was a descendant of Timur and Genghis Khan through his father and mother respectively. In 1526 he defeated Ibrahim Lodhi in the First Battle of Panipat and established the Mughal empire.
  • 1530

    Nasir-ud-Din Muḥammad, Humayun

    Nasir-ud-Din Muḥammad, Humayun
    Humayun, was the second emperor of the Mughal Empire, who ruled over territory in what is now Afghanistan, Pakistan, Northern India, and Bangladesh from 1530–1540 and again from 1555–1556.
  • 1538

    Sher Shah Suri, The Indian General

    Sher Shah Suri, The Indian General
    Sher Shah Suri, born Farīd Khān,a Pastun. He overthrew the government of Emperor Humayun and laid foundation of the Suri Empire in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent, with its capital in Sasaram in modern-day Bihar. He introduced the currency of rupee. Sher Shah took control of the Mughal Empire in 1538. He was a brilliant strategist, gifted administrator and a capable general.
  • 1555

    Emperor Humayun (Second rule)

    Emperor Humayun (Second rule)
    Like his father Babur he lost his kingdom early but regained it with the aid of the Safavid dynasty of Persia with more territories. At the time of his death the Mughal empire spanned to almost 1 million sq km.
  • 1556

    Abul Fath Jalal ud din Muhammad Akbar

    Abul Fath Jalal ud din  Muhammad Akbar
    Akbar the Great or Akbar I, was the third Mughal emperor, who reigned from 1556 to 1605. Akbar succeeded his father, Humayun, under a regent, Bairam Khan, who helped the young emperor expand and consolidate Mughal domains in India. He established strong administration and economy and great social and religious reforms although he faced great resistance to many of them. During his rule the Mughal Empire tripled in size and wealth.
  • Nur ud din Muhammad Salim, Jahangir Badshah Ghazi

    Nur ud din Muhammad Salim, Jahangir Badshah Ghazi
    Jahangir, was the fourth Mughal Emperor, who ruled from 1605 until his death in 1627. His imperial name, means 'conqueror of the world'. He faced rebellion from his eldest son Khusrau Mirza. He was married to Queen Noor Jahan and was much under her influence.
  • Shahab-ud-din Muhammad Khurram , Shah Jehan

    Shahab-ud-din Muhammad Khurram , Shah Jehan
    Khurram was the fifth Mughal emperor, who reigned from 1628 to 1658. He is widely considered one of the greatest Mughal emperors; under his reign the Mughal Empire reached the peak of its glory. He is best remembered for his architectural achievements such as the Taj Mahal, the tomb of his beloved wife Arjumand Banu, Mumtaz Mahal
  • Muhi-ud-Din Muhammad, Aurangzeb, Alamgir

    Muhi-ud-Din Muhammad, Aurangzeb, Alamgir
    Alamgir (Persian: "Conqueror of the World"), was the sixthand the last effective Mughal emperor, who ruled over almost the entire Indian subcontinent for a period of 49 years. During his reign Mughal Empire reached its greatest extent. He was a Hafiz Quran and fully established Sharia Law and Islamic economics in Indian subcontinent. He was a controversial ruler.
  • Bahadur Shah Awwal, Muhammad Mu'azzam, Shah Alam

    Bahadur Shah Awwal, Muhammad Mu'azzam, Shah Alam
    Bahadur Shah Awwal, was the seventh Mughal emperor of India, ruled from 1707 until his death in 1712. In his youth, he conspired to overthrow his father Aurangzeb, the sixth Mughal emperor, and ascend to the throne. Shah's plans were intercepted by the emperor, who imprisoned him several times but later he defeated his brothers to become the King. His reign was marked byrebellions from Rajputs, Marathas and Sikhs.
  • Bahadur Shah Zafar, Bahadur Shah II, Mirza Abu Zafar Siraj-ud-din Muhammad

    Bahadur Shah Zafar, Bahadur Shah II, Mirza Abu Zafar Siraj-ud-din Muhammad
    Bahadur Shah Zafar was the last Mughal emperor. He was the second son and successor to his father, Akbar II, upon his death on 28 September 1837. He was a nominal Emperor, as the Mughal Empire existed in name only and his authority was limited only to the walled city of Old Delhi (Shahjahanbad). Following his involvement in the Indian Rebellion of 1857, the British exiled him to Rangoon in British-controlled Burma (now in Myanmar), after convicting him on several charges.