British History

  • Period: 4000 BCE to 2000 BCE

    the first Pre-Celtic settlement

    6000 years ago the first populations burn the forest to the development of the agriculture and the livestock
  • 3800 BCE

    Spinsters' Rock

    Spinsters' Rock
    Spinsters' Rock is a Neolithic dolmen near Drewsteignton in Devon. The dolmen consist of three granite supports rising to between 1.7 and 2.3 metres surmounted by a capstone.
  • 3500 BCE

    Trewardreva Fogou

    Trewardreva Fogou
    Trewardreva Fogou is situated about 1km north of Constantine and around 100m SE of a secondary road opposite the gates to Trewardreva Hall. The fogou structure is not completely buried below ground level and consequently there is a noticable "hump" over the length of the passage. The location of the original entrance to the fogou is unknown, but if it was in keeping with those at other better preserved fogous, it would have been a narrow creepway passage.
  • 3100 BCE

    Stonehenge

    Stonehenge
    Located in southern England, it is comprised of roughly 100 massive upright stones placed in a circular layout. It consists of a ring of standing stones.There are many ideas about its function, but many historian think that it was an ancient astronomic observatory. Stonehenge was added to the World Heritage list in 1986
  • 3000 BCE

    Sperris Quoit

    Sperris Quoit
    The Sperris Quoit is a megalithic tomb. It is located on a moor around 365 metres northeast of Zennor Quoit. It was descovered in 1954
  • Period: 2000 BCE to 1000 BCE

    Bronze Age

    Pre-Celtic started metalworking and buit ritual sites, the most famous is Stonehenge
  • 1500 BCE

    Flag Fen

    Flag Fen
  • 700 BCE

    The Celts arrive in England

    The Celts arrive in England
    The Celts were tall, with fair skin, blue eyes and blonde hair. They were farmers, hunters, fishermen and metalworkers.
  • Period: 500 BCE to 100 BCE

    The Celts settlement

    when they arrive in England,build hill forts and take with them their culture and religion.
  • Period: 55 BCE to 408

    Roman Invasion

    Julius Caesar led a roman invasion of Britain in 55-54 BC but the country was not conquered until 47 AD. For 15 generations Britain was part of the Roman Empire. The conquest of Britain had moved on and instead of a military base, what Rome needed now was a colony. They would be allocated plots of land within the bounds of the settlement in order to establish a Roman presence within the conquered area. So they built the first cities and the roads
  • 77

    Colchester

    Colchester
    Colchester is a historic town located in Essex, England. It served as the first capital of Roman Britain and is oldest recorded town in Britain. The town came from the Stronghold of Camulos. It is first mentioned on coins minted by Tasciovanus in the period 20-10BC. A Roman legionary fortress or castrum, the first permanent legionary fortress to be built in Britain was established within the confines of Camulodunum following the successful invasion in 43 AD.
  • 122

    Hadrian's Wall

    Hadrian's Wall
    Hadrian's Wall was a Roman frontier built in the years AD 122-30 by order of the Emperor Hadrian. It was 73 miles long and ran from Wallsend-on-Tyne in the east to Bowness on the Solway Firth in the west.
  • 409

    End of roman control of Britain

    End of roman control of Britain
  • Period: 450 to 1066

    Anglo-Saxons

    They arrive in Britain in 450 AD. Their society was founded on loyalty. In 7th century there were 7 Anglo-Saxson kingdoms
  • 597

    Canterbury Cathedral

    Canterbury Cathedral
    Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England. It forms part of a World Heritage Site. It is the cathedral of the Archbishop of Canterbury, leader of the Church of England and symbolic leader of the worldwide Anglican Communion. Founded in 597 thanks to Augustine of Hippo.
  • Period: 600 to 700

    foundation of many monasteries

    in this time the monastery was the place where someone could learn to read and write
  • 634

    foundation of Lindisfarne Priory

    foundation of Lindisfarne Priory
    The monastery of Lindisfarne was founded by Irish monk Saint Aidan, who had been sent from Iona off the west coast of Scotland to Northumbria at the request of King Oswald. The priory was founded before the end of 634. It was destroyed in 793 by the Vikings and rebuilt only in 1350 by the normans
  • Period: 793 to 878

    The First Vikings Invasion

    They were a sea people. In 793 they crossed the Atlantic and sacked Lindesfarne. In 9th their invasion became an occupation. But when they reached Wessex, they met opposition from Ethelred, the king of Wssex, who died in 871. His son Alfred became the king and in 878 devasted Danish army.
  • 829

    The Wessex

    The Wessex
    one of the kingdoms, the Wessex, became the most important
  • May 6, 878

    Battle of Edington

    Battle of Edington
    At the Battle of Edington an army of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex under Alfred the Great defeated the Great Heathen Army led by Guthrum.
  • Aug 10, 991

    Battle of Maldon

    Battle of Maldon
    The Battle of Maldon againist the Vikings took place near Maldon during the reign of Æthelred the Unready. The battle ended in an Anglo-Saxon defeat. After the battle Archbishop of Canterbury advised King Æthelred to buy off the Vikings rather than continue the armed struggle. The result was a payment of 10,000 Roman pounds (3,300 kg) of silver, the first example of Danegeld in England.
  • 1013

    The vikings conquered England

    The vikings conquered England
    Sweyn Forkbeard, King of Denmark, having invaded the country, is proclaimed as King within the Danelaw.
  • Oct 14, 1066

    Battle of Hastings

    Battle of Hastings
    The Battle of Hastings was fought on 14 October 1066 between the Norman-French army of William, the Duke of Normandy, and an English army under the Anglo-Saxon King Harold Godwinson, beginning the Norman conquest of England. It took place approximately 7 miles (11 kilometres) northwest of Hastings. In the battle Harold was defeated by the Normans. So Anglo-Saxons were conquered by the Normans.
  • Period: Dec 25, 1066 to Sep 9, 1087

    The William I kingdom

    William the Conqueror was crowned in 1066. During is reign was introduced the feudal system and the French churchmen seized power.
  • 1086

    Domesday Book

    Domesday Book
  • Aug 5, 1100

    Henry I Became King Of England

    Henry I Became King Of England
    Henry, the youngest son of William I, became King of England following the death of William Rufus, who had been shot while hunting in the New Forest.
  • 1135

    Henry I died

    Henry I died
    His nephew Stephen became the King, but Matilda, Henry's daughter, war his rightful heir. And that started a period of wars
  • Period: 1135 to 1153

    Anarchy

    A period of civil wars
  • 1153

    End of Anarchy

    Signed by a treaty between the two contenders.
  • Period: 1154 to 1485

    The Plantagenets

    This dynasty is normally subdivided into three parts.
    1154-1216 - The first Plantagenet kings were the Angevins
    1216-1399 - The Plantagenets
    1399-1485 - The Houses of Lancaster and of York.
    Altogether the House of Plantagents ruled for 331 years (includes The Houses of Lancaster and of York).
  • Period: 1154 to 1216

    Angevins

    King Henry II 1154 - 1189
    King Richard I the Lionheart 1189 - 1199
    King John 1 1199 - 1216
  • Oct 25, 1154

    The First Plantagenet King

    The First Plantagenet King
    Henry II, the first 'Plantagenet' king, accedes to the throne. He was not only king of England, but also ruled over most of Wales, Normandy, Anjou, Gascony and other parts of France (acquired through his marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine).
  • 1164

    Constitutions of Clarendon

    Constitutions of Clarendon
    The Constitutions were composed of 16 articles and represent an attempt to restrict ecclesiastical privileges and curb the power of the Church courts and the extent of Papal authority in England.
  • Dec 29, 1170

    Thomas Becket, The Archibishop of Canterbury, Died.

    Thomas Becket, The Archibishop of Canterbury, Died.
    Thomas Becket was Henry II's Chancellor before the king made him Archbishop of Canterbury, even though he had never been a priest. Thomas Becket is mostly remembered for his quarrel with Henry .Becket was slaughtered in the Canterbury Cathedral by four knights acting on the words of the king on 29th December 1170.
  • Sep 3, 1189

    King Richard I the Lionheart

    King Richard I the Lionheart
    In his 10 years of reign he only spent 10 months in England, with the rest of the time being spent leading the Third Crusade. He spoke very little English.He is usually depicted as a brave, warrior king, and was given the nickname 'Lionheart'. Richard had no children, so the next king was his brother John.
  • May 27, 1199

    King John I

    King John I
    Youngest brother of King Richard and the youngest son of Henry II
    King of England from 1199 and acting king from 1189 during his brother Richard the Lion-Heart's absence on the Third Crusade.
    John lost Normandy and France in 1205
  • Jun 15, 1215

    Magna Carta

    Magna Carta
    The Magna Carter placed England on the road to a democratic state and introduced the lawyers in England to the concept of Human Rights as we know it now.
  • Oct 18, 1216

    King Henry III

    Henry, crowned when 9 years old, did not take full control of England until 1227 when he was 20. His reign lasted fifty-six years, making it the longest of any English monarch
  • Period: Oct 28, 1216 to 1399

    The Plantagenets

    King Henry III 1216 - 1272
    King Edward I 1272 - 1307
    King Edward II 1307 - 1327
    King Edward III 1327 - 1377
    Richard II 1377 - 1399
  • 1258

    Provisions of Oxford

    Provisions of Oxford
    The Provisions of Oxford is a plan of reform accepted by Henry III, in return for the promise of financial aid from his barons. It can be regarded as England’s first written constitution.
  • Aug 4, 1265

    Battle of Evesham

    Battle of Evesham
    Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, was killed and it marked the defeat the rebellious barons by the future King Edward I, who led the forces of his father, King Henry III.
  • Nov 20, 1272

    King Edward I

    King Edward I
    Edward 'Longshanks' fought wars against the Scots King Robert the Bruce and was called 'the hammer of the Scots'.
  • 1295

    Model Parliament was formed

    Model Parliament was formed
    Edward I formed the Model Parliament in 1295, bringing together the knights, clergy, nobility and burgesses of the cities, bringing Lords and Commons together for the first time.
  • Feb 25, 1308

    King Edward II

    King Edward II
    He was called Edward of Carnarvon after his birthplace in Wales.His invasion of Scotland in 1314 to suppress revolt resulted in defeat at Bannockburn.
  • Jan 29, 1327

    King Edward III

    King Edward III
    Edward's mother the French Isabella and her lover Mortimer ruled while Edward III was in his minority. In 1330 Edward now 17 assumes Royal Powers.
  • 1348

    Order of the Grater

    Order of the Grater
    Formed of a group of 24 chivarly.
  • Jun 22, 1377

    King Richard II

    King Richard II
    In the first part of his reign, because he was so young, the country was ruled by his uncle, John of Gaunt.
  • 1381

    Peasants' Revolt

    Peasants' Revolt
    In 1381 Richard was faced with the Peasants' Revolt, a result of the imposition of the Poll Tax in 1380. The leader of the Revolt, Wat Tyler, was killed at Smithfield by the Lord Mayor of London, fearing for the safety of the king.