The Black Plague Timeline

  • Jan 1, 1338

    The first victims of the Black Plague

    The first victims of the Black Plague were found at Lake Issyk Kul in Russia. This happened at 1338 and 1339. The grave marker said this was the grave of Kutluk and his wife Magnu Kelka who died from the black plague.
  • 1347

    Outbreak of the Black Death

    In Constantinople, Sicily, Genoa and Alexandria. It also reaches France, England, Tunisia and Mecca. The Jews are blamed for the plague and the Pope issues official statements declaring their innocence.
  • Oct 15, 1347

    Black Death arrives in Europe by ship

    Black Death arrives in Europe by ship
    Genoese trading ships dock in a Sicilian Harbor with most of the crews dead, and the very few that were alive were in grave condition. Symptoms included black boils and gave their illness its name "Black Death".
  • Aug 15, 1348

    Black Death arrives in England

    Black Death arrives in England
    The Death arrived in the famous port of Bristol. This was only the beginning of the wrath the death would ensue.
  • Sep 2, 1348

    King Edward III's daughter dies of the plague

    King Edward III's daughter dies of the plague
    On september 2nd, King Edward's favorite daughter, Joan, died from the plague in Bordeuax. She was on her way to the arranged marrage of her and King Pedro of Castille.
  • 1349

    The Black Death reaches Scandanavia

    The Black Death reaches Scandanavia
  • Jan 1, 1349

    3,000 Jews killed in Black Death riots in Germany

    3,000 Jews killed in Black Death riots in Germany
    3000 jews are killed in Efurt, Germany as many people believed they were the cause of the plague.
  • May 1, 1349

    The Black Plague transferred

    The Black Plague transferred
    The black Plague reached Bergen in Norway on a ship that was carrying a wool that were infected by the black plague. Unluckily, all the passengers and crews who were on the boat died.
  • Jul 19, 1349

    King Edward III orders the streets to be cleared of dead bodies

    King Edward ordered the Mayor of London to clean the streets of the city. He complained the streets were "foul with human faces"
  • Jan 1, 1350

    The Renaissance begins

    The Renaissance begins
    The renaissance started at 1350, and it was hugely effected by the Black Death. The Black Death helped the renaissance by killing lots of noble people which left lots of serfs and merchants with few noble people. Noble people needed their houses and buildings rebuilt and since there were lots of serfs and merchants that had the skills, the nobles had to use them. As soon as that happened, serfs and merchants's value went up and started the renaissance.
  • 1351

    The Black Death reaches Moscow

    The Black Death reaches Moscow
  • 1352

    25 million people dead from the Black Death

    25 million people dead from the Black Death
    By 1352, 25 million people in Europe had died of the Black death after it had left.*exact date not known
  • 1353

    Boccaccio writes about the Black Death

    Boccaccio writes about the Black Death
    Italian humanist Boccaccio's book, The Decameron, describes the Black Death in Florence.
  • Mar 15, 1361

    The Black Death returns again to Europe

    The Black Death returns again to Europe
    In 1361–62 the plague returned to England, this time causing the death of around 20% of the population. After this the plague continued to return intermittently throughout the 14th and 15th centuries, in local or national outbreaks. Mortality especially high among children. There are local, regional, and sometimes wider recurrences of the plague every 5-12 years or so.
  • 1374

    Quarantine imposed by the Venetian Republic

    For ships found infected with the plague
  • Jun 15, 1381

    Peasant's Revolt

    A revolt started by Wat Tyler. Peasants were fed up with the shortage of workers due to the black death.
  • 1382

    Europe-wide recurrence of plague

    Europe-wide recurrence of plague
  • 1400

    Aftermath of the Bubonic Plague

    It took about 150 years for the world population to return to normal levels. People became wary of their governments because of their inability to know the cause and stop the spread of the Plague. Governing bodies tried to lessen the spread of the Plague by stopping the export of foodstuffs and setting price controls on grains. Unfortunately, these measures had little or no effect on the spread of the Plague, but, rather, caused even greater food shortages in the hardest hit areas.
  • 1450

    Social Effects of Bubonic Plague

    Many people blamed Jews and believed that Jewish people poisoned the water supply, causing the spread of the plague. Religious groups, such as priests, lost a high percentage of lives because they worked caring for the afflicted, and became victims of the disease. As the Plague cleared, people with leprosy, as well as minor non-contagious skin problems were singled out and often killed out of fear.
  • The Great Plague of Seville

    The Great Plague of Seville
    The great plague of Seville occurred at 1647 and ended at 1652. It was an outbreak of black plague in Spain that murdered a quarter of Seville’s entire population. They lost a population of 150,000 from the whole 600,000 which they began with. The plague started out from Algeria, which was the Mediterranean side of Spain. The coastal city of Valencia was the first city that was corrupted by the plague and the coastal city of Valencia lost 30,000 people.
  • The Great Plague of Seville, Part 2

    The Great Plague of Seville, Part 2
    The disease continued its way to Andalucia and swept through Catalonia and Aragon. The coast Malaga lost about 50,000 people. Spain unfortunately lost about 500,000 people out of an entire population of 10,000,000. This plague was the greatest, but not the only, plague of 17th century Spain.
  • The Great Plague of Vienna

    The Great Plague of Vienna
    The great plague of Vienna happened in 1679 by a Bubonic plague that was caused by fleas and rats that carried bacteria called bacterium Yersinia Pestis. The city was soon neutralized by the epidemic which recurred once more killing 76000 residents. Vienna was actually located at the Danube River which was a major trading route for the traders and merchants, which lead the city to suffer the Black Death.
  • The Great Plague of Vienna, Part 2

    The Great Plague of Vienna, Part 2
    Vienna had lots of garbage littered at the streets which attracted lots of rats to gather. In addition, the merchants were jeopardizing themselves by trading items that were infected by the rats. The city was so filthy and squalid that the plague was even named the ‘Viennese Death’ in other parts of Europe.
  • The Black Plague in Moscow, Russia

    The Black Plague in Moscow, Russia
    The Black Plague which had passed all the way to Moscow reached the peak in September 1771, during the time where it was at Moscow. It took over 1/6 of Moscow's whole population at that time.
  • Ring around the Rosie written

    Ring around the Rosie written
    It was made in the 1790s but it was printed out on paper at 1881.
  • Pandemic

    The pandemic occurs once more in Russia, China and India,
  • End of the Third Pandemic

    The Third Pandemic finally meets it's end.
  • The Spanish Flu

    The Spanish Flu
    The Spanish Flu was the first influenza pandemic, which affected almost 500 million people worldwide. The illness 20 - 50 million people dead.
  • H1N1 Pandemic

  • Coronavirus Pandemic

    Coronavirus Pandemic