Michelle and Lindsay

  • 466

    King Clovis I

    Was the first king of Franks. United all the tribes under one ruler.
  • 540

    Justinian's Plague

    Justinian's Plague
    One of the victims of the plague was Emperor Justinian, and although he recovered, the plague killed 38,000 Londoners.
  • Jan 1, 622

    Prophet Muhammad

    Prophet Muhammad
    Fled from Mecca and migrated to Medina, where he became a political and spiritual leader.
  • Jan 1, 632

    Abu Bakr

    Muhammad's father-in-law, became Caliph after the death of the prophet, and began the expansion of the Arab empires.
  • Jan 1, 661

    The Umayyads

    The Umayyads
    Led by Mu'awiyah, moved the capital of the Arab empire from Medina to Damascus, created the Caliphate (office of the Caliph), and expanded the Arab empire throughout North Africa and into Spain.
  • Jan 1, 742

    King Charlemagne

    King Charlemagne
    King of the Franks and Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire
  • Jan 1, 750

    Abbasid Dynasty

    Abbasid Dynasty
    Ruled by Abu al-Abbas, and moved the capital of the Arab empire from Damascus to Baghdad, which became the center of trade. 750-1258 was considered the Golden Age of the Arab Empires.
  • Jan 1, 800

    King Charlemagne's Coronation

    The Pope supposedly surprised Charlemagne with the coronation, although many people believe that the Pope would never have dared to act without Charlemagne's knowledge.
  • Jan 1, 900

    Feudalism

    Feudalism
    Viking invasions caused communities to keep to themselves and begin the use of localized authority/social structure.
  • Jan 1, 962

    Holy Roman Empire

    Ruler was Otto I, Fredrick I, and Fredrick II. All the kings wanted to rule over both German and Italian lands. Fredrick I decided to make Italy the main land in the Roman Empire because he considered it a "holy empire".
  • Jan 1, 1028

    William of Normandy

    William of Normandy
    defeated last Anglo-Saxon king of England in the battle of Hastings
  • Jan 1, 1050

    Causes of the Crusades

    The Seljuk Turks invaded the Byzantine Empire and had taken almost all of their lands in Asia, including the Holy Land (Jerusalem), and converted to Islam. This forced the emperor of the Byzantine Empire to ask the Pope for military assistance.
  • Jan 1, 1055

    The Seljuk Turks

    Converted to Islam and prospered in the Abbasid Empire, eventually capturing Baghdad. Their Sultan became the political leader and the Caliph became the spiritual leader.
  • Oct 14, 1066

    The Battle of Hasting

    Duke William of Normandy defeated King Harold of England in the battle of Hastings. This was the most famous battle fought on English soil
  • Sep 18, 1095

    Pope Urban II

    Called the first crusade in 1095 at the Council of Clermont.
  • Jan 1, 1097

    The First Crusade

    The First Crusade
    50,000 to 60,000 people gathered in Constantinople to begin the first crusade. They were ill prepared and knew very little about the climate, geography, or the culture of the holy land. After two years, and with only 12,000 people left, the Crusader army besieged Jerusalem for a month.
  • Jul 15, 1099

    Crusaders Captured the Holy Land

    Crusaders Captured the Holy Land
    Crusaders captured Jerusalem.
  • Jan 1, 1144

    The Second Crusade

    The city of Edessa was captured by the Turks and the Second Crusade was launched to retake the city. It was led by the King of France and the King of Germany, and both of their armies were separately defeated by the Turks. This crusade was a disaster.
  • Jan 1, 1187

    The Third Crusade

    Jerusalem fell to Muslim forces and King Richard led the Christian forces to retake the Holy Land. Muslims and Christians came to the agreement that the Muslims can keep control of Jerusalem but would allow Christians to pilgrimage to the city.
  • Jan 1, 1204

    King John

    King John
    Lost all of his land in France, arrested opponents at will, increased taxes, and led England into losing wars.
  • Jun 1, 1215

    The Magna Carta

    The Magna Carta
    In Runnymede, England, nobles stopped King John and forced him to sign the Magna Carta. The seven ideas of this document were that the King has to obey the law, the king can be removed from power if he doesn’t obey the law, he must consult nobles before raising taxes, he cannot take peoples private property, he must leave Church matters to the Pope, due Process of Law, and trial by Jury.
  • Jan 1, 1258

    The Mongols

    The Mongols
    Hulegu conquered and destroyed Baghdad; he hated Muslims
  • Jan 1, 1348

    The Black Death

    The Black Death
    Years after the Plague of Justinian, the bubonic plague peaks again and is estimated to have killed 30–60 percent of Europe's population.
  • Jan 1, 1480

    The Spanish Inquisition

    To generate more power to christianity in Spain The queen of Spain Queen Isabella created the Spanish Iqusition. People who were suspected of practicing a religon that was different form christianity were questioned and trotured for week and when they confessed they were burned at the stake.