Download (37)

Culture of the Middle Ages

By Nick78
  • 400

    Christian missionaries arrived in Ireland

    Christian missionaries arrived in Ireland
    These missionaries were the first to rid Ireland of their Pagan Idols. This led to monasteries being constructed for the devout christians to worship God. Christianity became the official religion of Ireland, making Ireland one of the greatest powers of the christian church.
  • Period: 400 to Jan 1, 1500

    Years

  • 432

    Saint Patrick began his work

    Saint Patrick began his work
    Saint Patrick was born in Roman Britain, and was one of the most important factors of the conversion of Ireland to christianity. As he began to gain power in Ireland, he started to construct sanctuaries to worship, his first in the city of Saul. After 40 years, Saint Patrick’s mission was complete and he converted all of Ireland to christianity.
  • 496

    King Clovis was the first king to convert the Franks to christianity

    King Clovis was the first king to convert the Franks to christianity
    King Clovis converted to christianity because he made a deal with his wife. The deal was if the his army (Franks) won a battle, he would convert to christianity. After he converted he ordered 3,000 of his troops to be baptised. Eventually, christianity became the main religion of the Franks and tribe became another force of the christian church.
  • 500

    Saint Benedict made set of standards for lives of monks, called Benedictine Rule

    Saint Benedict made set of standards for lives of monks, called Benedictine Rule
    Benedict was disgusted with the corruption of the world around him, so he decided to live his life as a hermit. He attracted followers and eventually they built a monastery for him in Monte Cassino. Benedict made a set of rules called the Benedict Rules, these rules set a standard for the daily life of monks. The rules stated that, monks could own absolutely nothing, but everything they had belonged to the community of the monks. This allowed these monasteries to become very rich and gain much
  • 597

    Pope Gregory I sent missionaries to England, led by monk named Augustine

    Pope Gregory I sent missionaries to England, led by monk named Augustine
    Augustine was sent on a mission called the Gregorian mission, when Pope Gregory sent him to preach christianity in England. At first, Augustine was sent back to rome because his fellow missionaries were afraid of their task ahead. When he returned with letters of encouragement from the pope, his missionaries went out and started preaching the word of God. They set up in the capital city, Canterbury in Saint Martin’s church. After years of traveling and preaching, Augustine and his missionaries
  • Jan 1, 600

    Palestine conquered

    Palestine conquered
    Muslim Arabs conquered Palestine, which was regarded as the Holy Land by Christians, because it was wear Jesus had lived and taught. However, Muslims were tolerant of other religions, including Christianity, and allowed people to practice a different religion, as long as they paid taxes.
  • Jan 1, 700

    Lindisfarne Gospels produced

    Lindisfarne Gospels produced
    The Lindisfarne Gospels were made by a monk named Eadfrith, which contained many writings from the gospel of Matthew. These gospels are among the most magnificent of the early gospels. This is important because it showed the beautiful artstyle of the monks in middle ages.
  • Jan 1, 751

    Pepin crowned “king by the grace of God”.

    Pepin crowned “king by the grace of God”.
    Pepin the Short, son of Charles Martel was granted half of his Frankish kingdom after his father's death. Six years later, Pepin’s brother entered a monastery and left the remaining half of the kingdom to Pepin. While in France, the pope met with Pepin and crowned him “King by the grace of God”. This is important because it showed the pope’s support of Pepin, therefore Pepin’s nation was part of the Christian church.
  • Jan 1, 800

    Charlemagne was declared “Emperor of the Romans"

     Charlemagne was declared “Emperor of the Romans"
    Charlemagne was a believer of christianity, and donated money and land to protect the pope from invaders. As a thanks, Pope Leo the third declared Charlemagne “Emperor of the Romans”. With his newfound title, Charlemagne promoted education and built schools for young nobles. He also, encouraged the Carolingian Renaissance, a time of the revival of culture in his nation.
  • Jan 1, 805

    Charlemagne founded a school at his palace for young nobles

    Charlemagne founded a school at his palace for young nobles
    Charlemagne with his great wealth from his many military wins, built a school in his palace for young nobles. His Carolingian schools taught the students grammar, geometry, music, and astronomy. These schools greatly increased the knowledge of the students, and allowed Charlemagne’s empire to become more knowledgeable.
  • Jan 1, 814

    Charlemagne's Death

    Charlemagne's Death
    Charlemagne's empire, which ruled over much of western europe, was split into different territories. Italy was greatly affected after Charlemagne passed in 814. They fell into a state of anarchy with no real strong ruler.
  • Jan 1, 962

    Otto the Great crowned emperor of the Romans by Pope John XII

    Otto the Great crowned emperor of the Romans by Pope John XII
    In 961 Otto the Great was asked for help from the pope to defend his papal states states from invaders. Otto defeated the invaders, and captured some of the army, and Otto was named the “Holy Roman Emperor”. The pope with aid of the Byzantines and Hungarians had an alliance against Otto, and planned to overthrow him. Otto discovered the plot, and ran Pope John XII from rome, and made Leo VIII the pope. This allowed Otto’s empire to grow and gain support from the christian church.
  • Jan 1, 1000

    Palestine conquered again

    Palestine conquered again
    Muslim Saljuq Turks from Central Asia conquered the Holy Land, and attacked part of the Byzantine Empire. When the Saljuq Turks became a threat the Constantinople, the emperor asked the Roman pope for help.
  • Jan 1, 1046

    Emperor Henry III reigned, 1046-1056 CE

    Emperor Henry III reigned, 1046-1056 CE
    He regarded the church as a branch of royal government, also a Holy Roman Emporer.
  • Jan 1, 1059

    cardinals began to elect each new pope

    cardinals began to elect each new pope
    Instead of being heredity, the position of pope was voted on by the cardinals in 1059. This allowed any devout christian to become the pope. This is because anyone who was a christian could go through training and become a priest. After someone is a priest, they can eventually become a cardinal and therefore become the pope.
  • Jan 1, 1095

    Meeting of church leaders

    Meeting of church leaders
    Pope Urban II called a meeting of church leaders in Clermont, France, in hopes to regain the Holy Land. He urged the nobles to stop fighting with each other, and join forces as Christians to regain the Holy Land. A cross was sewn into the clothes of people joining the cause, and it became known as the Crusades.
  • Jan 1, 1096

    First Crusade

    First Crusade
    The emperor feared the Crusaders would invade and conquer Constantinople, but he allowed them to pass through. the Crusaders then reached Jerusalem and slaughtered the Muslim and Jewish inhabitants of Jerusalem during the First Crusade, which lasted from 1096-1099.
  • Jan 1, 1100

    Scholasticism started

    Scholasticism started
    The attempt of medieval philosophers to reconcile Christian faith with Aristotle’s philosophy. It changed the thoughts of few, but was harshly criticized.
  • Nov 3, 1121

    Sic et Nom

    Sic et Nom
    Peter Abelard writes hsi book Sic et Nom which challenges and questions the current church doctrine. The book showed the inconsistentcies within the church doctrine and in The Bible.
  • Jan 1, 1150

    Romanesque Architecture 1000-1150 AD

    Romanesque Architecture 1000-1150 AD
    The achitects in the middle ages used a Roman style of achitecture and design. Later however, the Gothic style would become more prominant. 1000-1150 AD
  • Jan 2, 1151

    Gothic Achitecture

    Gothic Achitecture
    The Gothic style began to appear in the mid 1100s, replacing the romanesque style. It was much taller than the romanesque style. Many churches were bulit in this stlye as to glorify God by having the building tower over the rest of the city.
  • Jan 1, 1187

    Jerusalem recaptured

    Jerusalem recaptured
    Salah al-Din, the Muslim leader recaptured Jerusalem, which resulted in the Third Crusade after the news reached Europe.
  • Jan 1, 1189

    Third Crusade

    Third Crusade
    The leaders of England, France, and the Holy Roman Empire started out to capture the Holy Land. The attempt failed, but a truce allowed Christians to enter Jerusalem freely. The Third Crusade lasted from 1189-1192.
  • Jan 1, 1200

    Major universities begin to appear

    Major universities begin to appear
    Four Universities appear in Europe around this time. They will teach latin, grammar, logic, geometry, astronomy, and music. This expansion of education will result in the evolution of culture in Europe because many of these universities had a Greek or Roman influence. They would eveolve and uses standards which resulted in commnon knowledge which relateds to common culture.
  • Jan 1, 1204

    Constantinople looted

    Constantinople looted
    Crusaders looted Constantinople, stealing many Christian artifacts. The artificats were sent to the West, and the Byzantine Empire never regained their strength.
  • Jan 1, 1250

    End of Holy Roman Empire ruled by Emporers

    End of Holy Roman Empire ruled by Emporers
    The time span of emporers ruling, starting with Otto I, lasted from 926-1250. The Holy Roman Empire was considered to be a continuation or recreation of the ancient Roman Empire. Emporers were commonly German kings. This time period didn't have a great effect in the middle ages, other than its decendence from Charlemange's kingdom.
  • Jan 1, 1291

    Muslims capture Acre

    Muslims capture Acre
    The Crusades continued until
    1291, when the Muslims captured Acre, the last Christian stronghold.
  • Nov 3, 1378

    The Great Schism

    The Great Schism
    The Great Schism begins (1378-1417). This is a division of the catholic church. There are papacies in France and Rome and this results in a distrust in each other. Eventually they will reach and agreement and move the papacy back to Rome.