Christianity throughout the years

By sip5069
  • 312

    Battle of Milvian Bridge

    Battle of Milvian Bridge
    Constantine fights at the Battle of Milvian Bridge. A war between himself and Maxentius who was his brother-in-law. The fighting started because once Constantintius (Constantine's father) died the seat for emperor was up for grabs because the Tetrarchic idealogoy didn't provide for hereditary sucession. Constantine and Maxentius met in open battle on the Milvian Bridge which carries the Via Flaminia road across the Tiber River into Rome. This Battle was a defining moment in Christianity.
  • 312

    The Vision of Constantine

    The Vision of Constantine
    Constantine had a vision which led him to fight under the protection of the Christian God. Constantine with his army, was marching when he looked up to the sun and saw a cross of light above it, and with it the Greek words "Εν Τούτῳ Νίκα", "In this sign, conquer;" It is also remarked that Constantine had saw the Chi-Rho, or ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ in Greek which translates to "Christ", instead. There are different accounts of this event and how it transpired. This plays a key role in Christianity.
  • 312

    Constantine Enters Rome

    Constantine Enters Rome
    Constantine entered Rome on Oct. 29 312CE, Maxentius' body was fished out of the Tiber and decapitated. His head was paraded through the streets for all to see. His body was then sent to Carthage as proof to Constantine's victory. The battle gave Constantine undisputed control of the western half of the Roman Empire.
  • 313

    Edict of Milan

    Edict of Milan
    In February Constantine met with Licinius (who was Roman Emperor and was to marry Constantine's half-sister) to secure their alliance. The agreed on the Edict of Mian which officially granted full tolerance to Christianity and all other religions that were in the empire. he edict stated that Christians should be allowed to follow the faith without oppression. This removed penalties for professing Christianity, under which many had been martyred in persecutions of Christians.
  • 325

    Council of Nicea

    Council of Nicea
    In the summer of 325 CE Constantine had invited all 1800 bishops of the Christian church (about 1000 in the east and 800 in the west) to the First Council of Nicea. This council was called to deal with heretics that were a danger to the souls of the people that believed their words. The main concern of the council concerend Arian questions of the relationship between the Father and Jesus as being one in the same or two seperate beings. The Nicene Creed was a result
  • 410

    The Fall of the Roman Empire

    The Fall of the Roman Empire
    Rome was under invasion by the Ostrogoths, the Visigoths, the Huns and the Vandals. The Roman army was spread so thin that they were relying on making deals with some of these tribes to protect them, in exchange for allowing the tribs to live within the empire. The leader of the Visigoths realized that since the army was spread so thin that the city itself was free for the taking. By 410 CE the city was captured and sacked.
  • Dec 25, 800

    Coronation of Charlemagne as Holy Roman Emperor

    Coronation of Charlemagne as Holy Roman Emperor
    Christmas day 800 CE Charlemagne was crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Leo III. It is thought by Einhard that Charles didn't know he was to be crowned and had no suspicion of what was about to happen, and if pre-informed would not have accepted the imperial crown, is much discussed, some seeing in it an unwillingness to imperial authority on an ecclesiastical basis
  • Jan 1, 1054

    Schism of 1054

    Schism of 1054
    The Byzantine Court and the Roman Court split from each other over a first issue of Patriarch Michael I attacking the west because of the use of unleavened bread and viewed it as judaistic in practice. A letter was written and made its way to the Pope, Leo IX, in which he then declared papal supremacy by the order of the Donation of Constantine. Michael sent delegates to try and smoothe out the situation, but were met with hostility. Michael effectively refused to acknowledge their existence.
  • Nov 27, 1095

    First Crusade

    First Crusade
    The First Crusade is the result of the Byzantine Empire calling for help against the Ottoman Turks. When in reality the Byzantines really only wanted help defending themselves from the Turks as well as supplies and men. The West (Pope Urban II) declared a Holy Crusade to retake the Holy Land of Jerusalem from the Turks. (Thanks Urban that's exactly what we asked for.) Knights as well as peasants all went on this Crusade on the idea that by going on it all their sins were promised to be forgiven.
  • Jan 1, 1309

    Avignon Papacy

    Avignon Papacy
    A period in the history of the Roman Catholic Church from 1309 to 1378 when the seat of the Pope was moved from Rome to Avignon. The period has been called the "Babylonian Captivity", particularly by Martin Luther. Seven popes resided in Avignon (not all at the same time). Clement V was elected as Pope (a frenchmen) and refused to move to Rome, establishing his court in Avignon, France instead where it stayed for 67 years.
  • Jan 1, 1320

    John Wycliffe is born

    John Wycliffe is born
    Wycliffe was an early advocate for translation of the Bible into the common language. He completed his translation directly from the Vulgate into vernacular English in the year 1382, now known as Wycliffe's Bible. His fundamental belief was that the Church should be poor, as in the days of the apostles. Wycliffe tried to gain public favour by laying his theses before Parliament, and then made them public in a tract, accompanied by explanations, limitations, and interpretations.
  • Jan 1, 1337

    Hundred Years War

    Hundred Years War
    The Hundred Years' War was a series of conflicts waged from *Day and Month is not correct* The Hundred Years War, 1337 to 1453 between the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of France and their various allies for control of the French throne. It was the result of a dynastic disagreement dating back to William the Conqueror who became King of England in 1066, while remaining Duke of Normandy.
  • Jan 1, 1348

    The Black Death Ravages

    The Black Death Ravages
    The Black Death is thought to have started in China or central Asia, before spreading west. The plague then travelled along the Silk Road and reached the Crimea by 1346. From there, it was probably carried by Oriental rat fleas living on the black rats that were regular passengers on merchant ships. Spreading throughout the Mediterranean and Europe, the Black Death is estimated to have killed 30–60 percent of Europes population.
  • Jan 1, 1369

    Jan Hus is born

    Jan Hus is born
    After John Wycliffe, the theorist of ecclesiastical Reformation, Hus is considered the first Church reformer. Hus took an active role in the movement for reform in the church by attacking the morals of clergy, episcopate, and papacy from his pulpit. All books and valuable manuscripts of Wycliffe were burned, and Hus and his followers were excommunicated by Alexander V.
  • Jan 1, 1378

    Western Schism

    Western Schism
    In the history of the Roman Catholic church, the period from 1378 to 1417, when there were two, and later three, rival popes, each with his own following, his own Sacred College of Cardinals, and his own administrative offices. The followers of the two popes were divided chiefly along national lines. The spectacle of rival popes denouncing each other produced great confusion and resulted in a tremendous loss of prestige for the church.
  • Nov 14, 1381

    Black Death Leads to Peasant Revolts?

    Black Death Leads to Peasant Revolts?
    After the Plague ravaged Europe, lords were in desperate need of peasants to man their fields and bring in harvests. This labor shortage allowed for those who were still alive, to request higher wages for their labor. In 1351 a decree was issued that no peasant could earn more than what wages were in 1346. Most peasants tried to ignore this but ultimatly it led to a revolt in 1381, which the black death was essentially responsible for starting.
  • Jul 6, 1415

    Jan Hus is burned

    Jan Hus is burned
    On July 6, 1415 Jan Hus was executed by being burned at the stake on the decree of heresy against church doctrines. Including those against the Catholic Church, the Eucharist, and ecclesiology. Hus was a predecessor to the Protestant movement. His teachings had a strong influence in Europe.
  • Apr 6, 1453

    Fall of Constantinople

    Fall of Constantinople
    was the capture of Constantinople, the capital of the Byzantine Empire, which occurred after a siege by the Ottoman Empire, under the command of 21-year-old Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II, against the defending army commanded by Byzantine Emperor Constantine XI Palaiologos. The siege lasted from April 6 1453 until May 29 1453 when the city was conquered by the Ottomans. This led the official end of the Roman Empire.
  • Jan 1, 1456

    Gutenberg Printing Press

    Gutenberg Printing Press
    Johannes Gutenberg's work on the printing press began in approximately 1436 when he partnered with Andreas Dritzehn. His type case is estimated to have contained around 290 separate letter boxes, most of which were required for special characters, ligatures, punctuation marks. Gutenberg is also credited with the introduction of an oil-based ink which was more durable than the previously used water-based inks. Gutenberg's printing press played a large role in the Protestant Reformation.
  • Nov 10, 1483

    Martin Luther is born

    Martin Luther is born
    Martin Luther's father as well as his teachers were very strict with him. His father wanted him to be a lawyer, so that was what Martin went to school for. One day while walking from classes he was caught in a thunderstorm and promised God that if he survived he would become a monk. After the incident Martin became a monk at St. Augustine. Martin was afraid of God and practiced penance consistently, he grew more afraid of him until he came to a revelation while reading a passage from Romans.
  • Jun 28, 1491

    Henry VIII is born

    Henry VIII is born
    Henry Tudor, 2nd son of Henry VII, 3rd child, and younger brother to Arthur Tudor. Henry was not expected to have the throne of England being the second son, however after his brother Arthur died at the age of 15, Henry (age 10), was succeeded to the Dukedom of Cornwall and prepped for the throne.
  • Jun 23, 1509

    Henry VIII marries Catherine of Aragon

    Henry VIII marries Catherine of Aragon
    Catherine was originally married to Henry's older brother Arthur but after his passing Henry VII still wanted an alliance between England and Spain. Henry and Catherine wed after given the Popes blessing (which was needed since Henry was marrying his brothers wife and this was considered a sin in the Bible). Henry and Catherine had several children but only one survived, a girl, Mary Tudor.
  • Jul 10, 1509

    John Calvin is born

    John Calvin is born
    He was an influential French theologian and pastor during the Protestant Reformation. He was also a figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism. He broke from the Roman Catholic Church around 1530. Calvinisms key belief is the belief in predestination, in that God has already predetermined whether or not you will go to heaven or hell.
  • Feb 18, 1516

    Mary Tudor is born

    Mary Tudor is born
    Princess Mary Tudor, 4th child conceived by Henry VIII and Queen Catherine of Aragon was born. Mary would be the first child Henry VIII would have and the last successful child Catherine would have.
  • Oct 31, 1517

    Martin Luther's 95 Theses

    Martin Luther's 95 Theses
    Martin Luther publishes his 95 Theses by posting them onto a church door. Martin's main problem with the church was the selling of indulgences. He insisted that, "since forgiveness was God's alone to grant, those who claimed that indulgences absolved buyers from all punishments and granted them salvation were in error. Christians, he said, must not slacken in following Christ on account of such false assurances."
  • Jan 28, 1521

    Diet of Worms

    Diet of Worms
    An imperial diet of the Holy Roman Empire held in Worms, Germany. It is most memorable for the Edict of Worms, which addressed Martin Luther and the effects of the Protestant Reformation. It began on January 28 1521- May 25 1521 and was overseen by Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. After the Diet of Worms it was expected that Martin would be punished and possibly killed, a friend Prince Frederick kidnapped him while Martin was on his way home, to save him from this fate.
  • Jan 1, 1524

    German Peasants War

    German Peasants War
    It was a widespread popular revolt in the German-speaking areas of Central Europe, 1524–1526. It consisted of economic and religious reasons for the revolt as well and peasants and nobles were both involved in it. Luther originally had sided with the peasants but after the violence broke out he sided with the German Princes.
  • Jan 1, 1525

    King's Great Matter

    King's Great Matter
    Henry VIII conducts an affair with Anne Boleyn and becomes infatuated with her. Henry was angered that Catherine was unable to give him the male heir that he wanted so badly, and with Anne's promise that she would be able to give him that heir, Henry started a reformation within his kingdom that would affect Christendom.
  • Mar 15, 1529

    Diet of Speyer

    Diet of Speyer
    The Diet opened on March 15th and was held to address previous issues from the Diet of 1526 as well as newer issues. It dealt with action against the Turks, whose armies were pressing forward in Hungary, and would hit Vienna later in the year, and against the further progress of Protestantism. Lutheran members at the Diet, protested against measures taken at the Diet of 1526, anything that was contrary to the word of God, as well as their conscience.
  • Jan 25, 1533

    Henry VIII marries Anne Boleyn

    Henry VIII marries Anne Boleyn
    Henry and Anne wed after a long and arduous fight between Henry VIII, parliament, and Rome. Henry had continuously held sessions to acheive a divorce from Catherine of Aragon, first on the grounds that he had sinned and married his brothers wife and felt guilty for it. Later he claimed that Arthur and Catherine had consumated their marriage and that Catherine belonged to Arthur. Henry finally got fed up and separated from Rome.
  • Sep 7, 1533

    Elizabeth I is born

    Elizabeth I is born
    Only child of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, Elizabeth I was younger sister to Mary Tudor (Mary I of England). Elizabeth would play a large role in the struggle of religion within England, and ultimately would become the most successful monarch England ever had.
  • Nov 1, 1534

    Act of Supremacy

    Act of Supremacy
    A piece of legislation that granted King Henry VIII of England Royal Supremacy, which means that he was declared the supreme head of the Church of England. After the Pope refused to grant Henry his divorce and threatened excommunication from the Church, Henry and parliament passed the Act of Supremacy, effectively splitting England from the grasps of the Roman Church. This piece of legislation spurted forth the Anglican faith that became the official religion of England.
  • Jan 1, 1536

    John Calvin writes Institutes of the Christian Religion

    John Calvin writes Institutes of the Christian Religion
    This book consisted of 6 chapters in the beginning and by the end of Calvin's death had 80. It was intended to be an introductory book on the Christian faith for people with some knowledge about Christian beliefs and practices. It also attacked any teachings that Calvin thought were unorthodox, particularly directed at the Catholic Church.
  • Oct 12, 1537

    Edward VI is born

    Edward VI is born
    Edward was born to Henry VIII and his third wife Jane Seymour (who died shortly after giving birth to Edward). Edward was the youngest to his two older sisters Mary and Elizabeth. After Henry's death Edward would take the throne at the age of 9 and would only rule for 7 years before he died at the age of 16. Edward was raised Protestant and would take the country in a completely Protestant direction. It was during his reign that the Book of Common Prayer was issued, it is still used by Anglicans
  • Dec 13, 1545

    Council of Trent

    The Council issued condemnations on what it defined as Protestant heresies and defined Church teachings in the areas of Scripture and Tradition, Original Sin, Justification, Sacraments, the Eucharist in Holy Mass and the veneration of saints. It issued numerous reform decrees. By specifying Catholic doctrine on salvation, the sacraments, and the Biblical canon, the Council was answering Protestant disputes.
  • Feb 18, 1546

    Luther Dies

    Luther Dies
    Luther had been ill for many years with various conditions, including vertigo and a cataract in one eye. An apopleptic stroke made him lose his speech and he died shortly after.
  • Jan 28, 1547

    Henry VIII dies

    Henry VIII dies
    Henry suffered from obesity as well as an infected leg that had plagued him from a jousting accident in his youth. It was covered in sores and caused him consistent pain whenever it was reopened. He died at the age of 55 and was succeeded by his son Edward.
  • Jan 1, 1549

    Book of Common Prayer

    Book of Common Prayer
    It was published in 1549, in the reign of Edward VI, it was a product of the English Reformation following the break with Rome. Prayer books, unlike books of prayers, contain the words of structured services of worship. The work of 1549 was the first prayer book to include the complete forms of service for daily and Sunday worship in English.
  • Jul 19, 1553

    Queen Mary I of England takes the throne

    Queen Mary I of England takes the throne
    Mary I succeeded to the throne of England after her brother Edward's young death. Mary was a staunch Catholic, taking after her mother, and was determined to take the country in the right direction by making the country's religion Catholic, once again. Mary was given the title Bloody Mary after she went on a rampage, persecuting Protestants by having them burned at the stake. She continued the Heresy Acts until her death. All those that had been killed were declared martyrs afterwards.
  • Nov 17, 1558

    God Save The Queen!

    God Save The Queen!
    Queen Elizabeth I of England takes the throne after her anti-protestant sister Mary I's death. Elizabeth's reign was prosperous religiously as well as economically. Elizabeth created what became known as the Via Media or middle way, in religion in England. She restored the Anglican faith in England and held a protestant standpoint but tolerated catholics and allowed them to still practice their faith, behind closed doors, and as long as they went to a Church service once a year.
  • Dec 1, 1558

    Second Act of Supremacy

    Second Act of Supremacy
    The Act revived 10 acts which Mary had reverted, significantly clarified and narrowed the definition of what constituted heresy, and confirmed Elizabeth as Supreme Governor of the Church of England. Supreme Governor was a suitably equivocal title that made Elizabeth head of the Church without ever saying she was. Mary I had originally repealed the First Act of Supremacy once she had taken the throne, leaving it to Elizabeth to reinstate once she took the throne.
  • May 27, 1564

    John Calvin Dies

    John Calvin Dies
    John calvin suffered from a high fever and then a particularly violent cough caused him to break a blood vessel in his lungs that made him cough up blood. His health declined after this until his death.
  • Compilation of Early America Events 1585-1681

    1585- English move to America, 1607- first colony in Jamestown, 1620- Pilgrims on Plymouth Rock, MA, 1632- Maryland founded (catholic colony), 1634- Catholics are outlawed in Maryland, 1644- Founded Rhode Island (Roger Williams, Baptist), 1681- PA founded, Quaker State (William Penn)
  • War of the Henrys (France)

    War of the Henrys (France)
    War of the Henry's was a final war in a series of wars fought in the Wars of Religion in France between the royalists, led by Henry III of France; the Huguenots, led by the heir-presumptive Henry of Navarre; and the Catholic League, led by Henry I, Duke of Guise and funded and supported by Philip II of Spain. In the end Henry of Navarre was the victor and became Henry IV of France.
  • Edict of Nantes (France)

    Edict of Nantes (France)
    The Edict of Nantes granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered Catholic. In the Edict, Henry IV aimed primarily to promote civil unity. The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance.
  • Elizabeth I dies

    Elizabeth I dies
    Elizabeth's health was in decent shape until a few of her close friends began passing away, causing her to suffer from depression and her health began to deteriorate. A very close friend to Elizabeth passed away and this dealt a particularly harsh blow to the Queen, causing her to have a melancholy state. She became ill in the beginning of March and on March 24 the greatest Monarch England ever had, died.
  • James I of England

    James I of England
    James I, cousin to Elizabeth I, takes the throne of England after Elizabeth's death. James was also James VI of Scotland and ruled both Scotland and England until his death in 1625. James had severe problems with the Catholics in England, considering there were more there than in Scotland. James survived three conspiracies against him, all waged by Catholics. He also had problems with Puritans. It is during his reign we get the King James version of the Bible.
  • Henry IV assassinated

    Henry IV assassinated
    Henry was the subject of attempts on his life by Pierre Barriere in August 1593, and Jean Chatel in December 1594.
    King Henry IV was ultimately assassinated in Paris on 14 May 1610 by a Catholic fanatic, Francois Ravaillac, who stabbed the king to death in Rue de la Ferronnerie, while his coach's progress was stopped by traffic congestion for the Queen's coronation ceremony.
  • King James Bible (1604-1611)

    King James Bible (1604-1611)
    The Authorized Version, commonly known as the King James Version, is an English translation of the Christian Bible by the Church of England begun in 1604 and completed in 1611. the New Testament was translated from Greek, the Old Testament was translated from Hebrew text, while the Apocrypha were translated from the Greek and Latin.
  • Thirty Years War (1618-1648)

    Thirty Years War (1618-1648)
    It was a series of wars that were fought mainly in Central Europe, involving most of the countries of Europe. It was one of the longest and most destructive conflicts in European history, and one of the longest continuous wars in modern history. it was fought largely as a religious war between Protestants and Catholics in the Holy Roman Empire.
  • Charles I of England

    Charles I of England
    Charles I takes to the throne of England after his father's death. His reign was characterised by religious conflicts. His failure to successfully aid Protestant forces during the Thirty Years' War, coupled with the fact that he married a Roman Catholic princess, generated deep mistrust concerning the king. Charles' subjects felt that he was trying to allie the Church of England with Rome and this was not taken too well.
  • Roger Williams and Baptists

    Roger Williams and Baptists
    Williams started the first Baptist church in America, the First Baptist Church of Providence. He was a student of Native American languages and an advocate for fair dealings with Native Americans. The Baptist faith believes in the neccessity of complete imersion for baptism and that being baptized is neccessary for salvation. Williams founded the colony of Rhode Island based upon principles of complete religious toleration, separation of church and state, and political democracy.
  • First and Second English Civil Wars (1642-1649)

    First and Second English Civil Wars (1642-1649)
    These were a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians (Roundheads) and Royalists (Cavaliers). The first (1642–46) and second (1648–49) civil wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament. The beginning of these wars started with Charles I wanting to unite Scotland and England into one nation, however this didn't sit well with the English people.
  • Execution of Charles I

    Execution of Charles I
    For his defiance of Parliament and his causing of the English Civil wars, Charles was arrested in 1648, his trial took place in January of 1649, and he was beheaded on January 10 1649. On this day the people of England commited the unspeakable act of killing their own King.
  • Oliver Cromwell and the Commonwealth

    Oliver Cromwell and the Commonwealth
    Oliver Cromwell was a member of Parliament, a member of the English army, fought in the English Civil Wars, and lastly established the Commonwealth of England. Cromwell was a Puritan. He was a highly religious man who believed that everybody should lead their lives according to what was written in the Bible. During his time as head of government, he made it his task to ‘tame’ the Irish. He sent an army there and despite promising to treat, those who surrendered, well, they were slaughtered.
  • William Penn and Pennsylvania

    William Penn and Pennsylvania
    William Penn founded the Province of Pennsylvania. As a group of prominent Quakers, among them Penn, and two hundred settlers from the towns of Chorleywood and Rickmansworth in Hertfordshire and other towns in nearby Buckinghamshire arrived, and founded the town of Burlington. Penn joined the Religious Society of Friends or Quakers at the age of 22. The Quakers obeyed their "inner light", which they believed to come directly from God, refused to bow or take off their hats to any man.
  • Edict of Fontainebleau

    Edict of Fontainebleau
    By the Edict of Fontainebleau, Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes and ordered the destruction of Huguenot churches, as well as the closing of Protestant schools. This policy made official the persecution already enforced since the dragonnades created in 1681 by the king in order to intimidate Huguenots into converting to Catholicism. A large number of Protestants fled to England.
  • Glorious Revolution

    Glorious Revolution
    This was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland and James II of Ireland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III. King James's policies of religious tolerance after 1685, were met with opposition by members of leading political parties, who were troubled by the king's Catholicism and his close ties with France. The Revolution permanently ended any chance of Catholicism becoming re-established in England.
  • Salem Witch Trials

    Salem Witch Trials
    A series of hearings and prosecutions of people accused of witchcraft in colonial Massachusetts, between February 1692 and May 1693. Massachusetts government had been dominated by conservative Puritan secular leaders and based on statements made by young girls against a slave Tituba sparked the witch trials. The Puritans demanded names of other witches and held a series of trials against these accused (and innocent) women. 24 known accused died, 19 hung, 1 pressed, 4 died in prison.
  • First Great Awakening

    A Christian revitalization movement that swept Protestant Europe and British America, and especially the American colonies in the 1730s and 1740s, leaving a permanent impact on American religion. It resulted from powerful preaching that gave listeners a sense of deep personal revelation of their need of salvation by Jesus Christ. This made Christianity more personal to the people, and it also brought Christianity to African slaves.
  • John Wesley and the Methodists

    John Wesley and the Methodists
    Wesley is largely credited, along with his brother Charles Wesley, as founding the Methodist movement which began when he took to open-air preaching in a similar manner to George Whitefield. In contrast to George Whitefield's Calvinism, Wesley embraced the Arminian doctrines that were dominant in the 18th-century Church of England. Wesley helped to organize and form societies of Christians throughout England, Scotland, Wales, North America and Ireland as small groups that developed intensively.
  • Unitarian Universalists

    Unitarian Universalists
    The Unitarian movement began primarily in the Congregational parish churches of New England, which were part of the state church of Massachusetts. In Britain, Samuel Clarke (1675–1729) revised the Book of Common Prayer, removing the Trinitarian Nicene Creed and references to Jesus as God.
  • Second Great Awakening

    It was a Protestant revival movement during the early 19th century in the United States. The movement began around 1790, gained momentum by 1800, and, after 1820 membership rose rapidly among Baptist and Methodist congregations. It was past its peak by the 1840s. It has been described as a reaction against skepticism, deism and rational Christianity. The Second Great Awakening focused on Arminian Theology, by which every person could be saved through revivals, repentance, and conversion.
  • Mormonism

    Mormonism
    A religious and cultural group related to Mormonism, the principal branch of the Latter Day Saint movement, which began with the visions of Joseph Smith in upstate New York during the 1820s. After Smith's death in 1844 the Mormons followed Brigham Young to what would become the Utah Territory. Today a vast majority of Mormons are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) while a minority are members of other churches.
  • Evangelical Alliance (fundamentalist)

    The Alliance is the largest body serving evangelical Christians in the UK, and has a membership including denominations, churches, organizations and individuals. In 1895 a fundamentalist proclaimation states the Inerrancy of the bible, virgin birth of jesus, divinity of jesus, attoning death, and resurrection and return.
  • American Civil War

    American Civil War
    A civil war fought over the secession of the Confederate States. Eleven southern slave states declared their secession from the United States and formed the Confederate States of America ("the Confederacy"); the other 25 states supported the federal government ("the Union"). After four years of warfare, mostly within the Southern states, the Confederacy surrendered and slavery was abolished everywhere in the nation.
  • World War I

    World War I
    A global war centred in Europe that began on 28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918. It was predominantly called the World War or the Great War from its occurrence until the start of World War II in 1939. It involved all the world's great powers, which were assembled in two opposing alliances: the Allies (based on the Triple Entente of the United Kingdom, France and Russia) and the Central Powers (originally centred around the Triple Alliance of Germany, Austria-Hungary and Italy.
  • World War II and the Nazi Party

    World War II and the Nazi Party
    In 1933 the Nazi party came to power, and soon after it's arrival in political office it took measures to eliminate Jews. The Nazis began spreading propaganda about the Jews. They were the ethnic group that was used as a scapegoat for Germany's loss of World War I. This was one of the causes of strong anti-Semitism among Germans. World War II began in 1939 and Poland came under German control. With it came a Jewish Population of nearly 2 Million.
  • Anglican Realignment

    Anglican Realignment
    This is a movement among some Anglicans to align themselves under new leadership within or outside the Anglican Communion. This movement is primarily active in parts of the Episcopal Church in the United States and the Anglican Church of Canada. A major event that contributed to the movement was the 2002 decision of the Diocese of New Westminster in Canada to authorise a rite of blessing for same-sex unions.
  • Mitt Romney, Mormon

    Mitt Romney, Mormon
    An American businessman who served as the 70th Governor of Massachusetts from 2003 to 2007. He was the Republican Party's nominee for President of the United States in the 2012 election. He is also a Mormon.
  • Barack Obama, Protestant

    Barack Obama, Protestant
    He is the 44th and current President of the United States as well as the first African American to hold the office. He is a protestant christian and won the 2008 and 2012 Presidential Elections.