The War of 1812

  • The Napoleonic Wars Begin

    The Napoleonic Wars Begin
    A conflict between Britain and France that led to each of the two warring nations preventing The United States from trading with the other.
  • The Battle of Trafalgar

    The Battle of Trafalgar
    The British fleet completely destroys the French navy. After this event, Napoleon is unable to use France's naval power to challenge Great Britain.
  • The Berlin Decree

    The Berlin Decree
    Since Napoleon cannot challenge the British in a naval war, he tries to challenge the British with another approach: blocking British trade with the rest of the world. This decree is part of the "Continental System," and declares that France will seize any foreign ships sailing to British forts.
  • The Chesapeake-Leopard Incident

    The Chesapeake-Leopard Incident
    An American ship, The Chesapeake, was attacked and seized by The Leopard, a British ship. The boarding party of The Leopard captures four men from The Chesapeake, and one of these men ends up dying. This leads to public outcry against the British in America, calling for revenge.
  • The Milan Decree

    The Milan Decree
    Since Napoleon cannot challenge the British in a naval war, he tries to challenge the British with another approach: blocking British trade with the rest of the world. This decree is part of the "Continental System," and declares that France will seize any foreign ships sailing to British forts.
  • The Embargo Act

    The Embargo Act
    An act enacted by Thomas Jefferson that bans all U.S. trade with foreign nations. This is put into effect in order to stop the problems of British and French impressment. Although the act leads to a nationwide depression, it also spurs The Industrial Revolution.
  • The Non-Intercourse Act

    The Non-Intercourse Act
    This act was signed by Thomas Jefferson shortly before his presidency ended. This act replaced The Embargo Act, and opened up trade with all countries except Britain and France, as those were the two countries that were giving America all of its problems.
  • The Inauguration of James Madison

    The Inauguration of James Madison
    James Madison is inaugurated as president of The United States of America. He would be the leader of the country from this point until the end of the war and beyond.
  • The 1810 Elections

    The 1810 Elections
    During these elections, which took place on different days between April 24 1810 and August 2 1811, many representatives eager for war were voted into congress, including John C. Calhoun and Speaker of the House Henry Clay. These representatives came to be known as "War Hawks". They were major influencers in the eventual American declaration of war against Great Britain.
  • The Seizure of Baton Rouge

    The Seizure of Baton Rouge
    American settlers in Western Florida took over a fort in Baton Rouge and the territory was annexed by President Madison. This ultimately led to American interest in gaining all of Florida.
  • The Battle of Tippecanoe

    The Battle of Tippecanoe
    William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana Territory, leading 1,000 soldiers, provoked a battle at the Tippecanoe Creek near Prophetstown against Native Americans following Native leaders Tecumseh and The Prophet. This battle was a bloody American victory, and sent the natives into disarray. Although this battle disorganized the natives, it also provoked them to fight back in raids on White settlers in the years following.
  • The Declaration of The War of 1812

    The Declaration of The War of 1812
    Madison gives in to Congress, approving a declaration and starting The War of 1812.
  • The French Invasion of Russia

    The French Invasion of Russia
    Napoleon sends his forces across the Neman river, starting a military campaign that dismantles the French military, and eventually leads to Napoleon's surrender a few years later. This event allows Britain to focus its military attention on America.
  • The First American invasion of Canada

    The First American invasion of Canada
    The American army begins an invasion of Canada through Detroit. This was one of many failed American attempts at invasion. The American forces were forced to surrender a month later.
  • The Fall of Fort Dearborn

    The Fall of Fort Dearborn
    Fort Dearborn, an American fort located at Chicago, is attacked by Potawatomi Indians, and burned to the ground. This was one of many examples of American defeat on the western side of the war.
  • The Battle of York

    The Battle of York
    Americans, after taking command of Lake Ontario, burn down the Canadian city of York, which is now called Toronto.
  • The Battle of Put-In-Bay

    The Battle of Put-In-Bay
    In another American victory on the Canadian border, Oliver Hazard Perry defeats a British fleet in a battle that is alternatively called The Battle of Lake Erie, allowing for control of the lake and providing another opportunity to invade Canada by Detroit, this time by sea.
  • The Battle of the Thames

    The Battle of the Thames
    After the American victory at Put-In-Bay, William Henry Harrison leads an American force up the Thames River. In this battle, Harrison wins decisively, and the battle also leads to the death of native leader Tecumseh.This demoralizes the Native Americans and greatly decreases that threat on America's western frontier during the war.
  • The Battle of Horseshoe Bend

    The Battle of Horseshoe Bend
    Andrew Jackson leads a Tennessee state militia to a brutal attack on the Creek Indians at Horseshoe Bend, dismantling their resistance. This battle leads into Jackson's invasion of Florida, which takes place later on in the war.
  • The Siege of Washington

    The Siege of Washington
    In one of the most brutal American defeats in The War of 1812, British troops attack Washington, D.C. and set fire to multiple buildings.
  • The Battle of Plattsburgh

    The Battle of Plattsburgh
    This is another instance of American forces repelling a British invasion. This battle allowed America to secure its northern border, and was one of the battles leading up to the end of the war.
  • The Battle of Baltimore

    The Battle of Baltimore
    This battle follows The Siege of Washington, and ends in a vastly important American victory. This American victory also leads to the writing of The Star-Spangled Banner by Francis Scott Key, which would become the national anthem in 1931.
  • The Battle of Pensacola

    The Battle of Pensacola
    Andrew Jackson and his forces invade and conquer a Spanish fort at Pensacola. This event among others ultimately leads to American annexation of Florida.
  • The Hartford Convention

    The Hartford Convention
    New England delegates meeting to discuss possible secession over Federalist grievances about the conflicts between the North and the South decide to propose seven constitutional amendments. However, after The Treaty of Ghent is signed and The Battle of New Orleans occurs, the amendments are dismissed as irrelevant, and this event ultimately leads to the demise of the Federalist Party.
  • The Treaty of Ghent

    The Treaty of Ghent
    This treaty signed between America and Britain in a Dutch City, Ghent, officially ends The War of 1812. In the treaty, both parties essentially agree to give up each of their demands.
  • The Battle of New Orleans

    The Battle of New Orleans
    This is a dominant American victory, led by Andrew Jackson. It allows America to have full security of its southern and southwestern borders. However, this battle takes place after The War of 1812 ends. The news of the Treaty of Ghent doesn't reach Jackson until well after the battle.
  • The Rush-Bagot Agreement

    The Rush-Bagot Agreement
    This treaty, signed well after The War of 1812 ended, was an agreement between America and Britain that formally disarmed The Great Lakes, leading to the American-Canadian border becoming the longest unguarded frontier in the world.