The War of 1812

By zdevoid
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    The War of 1812

  • President Madison Takes Office

    President Madison Takes Office
    As President, Madison hoped to keep the United States out of war. Americans argued that the United States must stand up to Native Americans and foreign countries. This kind of talk aroused the nation. In the early 1800s, the United States went to war with several Native American nations. By 1812, many Americans were also calling for war with Britain.
  • War Hawks Take Power

    War Hawks Take Power
    Clay, Calhoun, and their supporters were called war hawks. Opposing to war was strongest in New England. Many New Englanders believed war with Britain would harm American trade. Warhawks were those eager for war with Britain. Relations with Britain worsened steadily in the early months of 1812.
  • Relations with Great Britain Worsen

    Relations with Great Britain Worsen
    Britain is supplying Native Americans with guns and ammunition. Britain encouraged Native Americans to attack U. S. settlements. U. S. and Britain disagree over trade. Napoleon announced France would respect the United States' policy of staying neutral. The United States continued trade with France, but stopped all shipments to Britain.
  • America is not Ready for War

    America is not Ready for War
    When the war began, Americans were confident they would win. It soon became apparent that the United States wasnt prepared for war. Jefferson's spending cuts had weakened American military strength. The navy had only 16 warships ready for action. The army was also small, with fewer than 7,000 men.
  • Congress Declares War on Britain

    Congress Declares War on Britain
    The war did not come at a good time for the British, who were still at war in Europe. Britain was not willing to meet American demands to avoid war. When the war began, American were confident they would win. Jefferson's spending cuts had weakened American military strength. The navy had only 16 warships ready for action and the army had fewer than 7,000 men.
  • Britain Blockades American Ports (part 1)

    Britain Blockades American Ports (part 1)
    Britain blockaded the Atlantic coast of the U. S. The British did this on the first day of war. U. S. squadrons defeated British squadrons on two inland lakes- Erie and Champlain- and both victories had a decisive impact on nearby land campaigns. After outrunning a British squadron in a heroic 57-hour race at the beginning of the war, the Constitution, a frigate, defeated four British warships in subsequent cruises. The U. S. frigate President also enjoyed success early in the war caputuring the
  • Britain Blockades American Ports (part 2)

    Britain Blockades American Ports (part 2)
    British frigate Macedonian which remained a trophy ship on the rolls of the U. S. Navy until 1875
  • Invasion of Canada

    Invasion of Canada
    American assumed that Canada would easily be overrun. Jefferson dismissed it as a "matter of marching." In contrast to the American militia, the Canadian militia performed well. After Hull's surrender, General Harrison was given command of the American Army of the Northwest. April 27, 1813 Americans attack and burn York, the capital of Upper Canada.
  • USS Constitution Scores a Victory

    USS Constitution Scores a Victory
    The USS Constitution defeated the British warship Guerriere in a fierce battle.This was a major sea battle that happened in the beginning of the war. According to tradition, American sailors nicknamed the Constitution "Old Ironsides" because British artillery fire bounced off the ship's thick wooden hull. To the Americans it seemed as if the Constitution were made of iron.The USS Constitution frigate was named by George Washington and launched on October 21, 1797, in Boston, Massachusetts.
  • Battle of Lake Erie

    Battle of Lake Erie
    Both sides were aware of the importance of controlling the lake. A key three-hour battle took place at Put-In-Bay, in the western part of the bay in 1813. During the battle, the American flagship was badly damaged. The American commander,Oliver Hazard Perry, switched to another ship and continued the fight until it was won. The Americans won this battle.
  • Battle of Thames

    Battle of Thames
    Tecumseh, an indian war chief, died atthe Battle of Thames. Procter planned to trap Harrison on the banks of the Thames River. However, he had taken no steps towards fortifying the position. So, the ground presented no obstacle to the American mounted troops whille scattered trees masked the British fire. The United States had a decisive victory over the British in this battle.
  • Horseshoe Bend

    Horseshoe Bend
    Horseshoe Bend is part of the Creek War. Andrew Jackson won victory at Horseshoe Bend. Leader of the Creeks came solo to Jackson's camp to surrender. The fighting ended for the time being. The Native Americans had to give up land to the whites.
  • Washington D. C. Attacked and Burned

    Washington D. C. Attacked and Burned
    The new British strategy was to attack the nation's capital, Washinton, D. C. In August 1814, a British force marched into the city. Dolley Madison, the President's wife, gathered up the President's important papers and fled the White House. The British set fire to several government buildings, including the White House. Americans were shocked to learn that their army could not defend Washington.
  • Attack on Baltimore

    Attack on Baltimore
    Britain's first objective was Fort McHenry, which defended the city's harbor. British warships bombardedthe fort throughout the night. Francis Scott Key, a young American, watched the attack. At dawn, Key saw the American flag still flying over the fort. On the back of an old envelope, Key wrote a poem that he called, "The Star-Spangled Banner."
  • Writing of the Star Spangled Banner

    Writing of the Star Spangled Banner
    Francis Scott Key, a young American, watched the attack on Baltimore. At dawn, Key saw the American flag still flying over the fort. On the back of an old envelope, Key wrote a poem that he called "The Star-Spangled Banner." The poem was soon set with music. "The Star-Spangled Banner" became the national anthem.
  • Hartford Convention

    Hartford Convention
    Some delegates suggested that the New England states secede from the United States. While the delegates debated, news of the peace treaty arrived. With the war over, the Hartford Convention quickly ended. To some Americans, the War of 1812 was the "Second War of Independence." Once and for all, the U.S. secured its independence from Britain.
  • Treaty of Ghent

    Treaty of Ghent
    The treaty returned things to the way they had been before the war. News of the treaty took several weeks to reach the United States. In that time, the two sides fought one more battle. In January 1815 General Andrew Jackson leads American forces. America won a stunning victory over the British at the Battle of New Orleans.
  • Battle of New Orleans

    Battle of New Orleans
    General Andrew Jackson won a stunning victory over the British in the Battle of New Orleans. This was the final battle of the war. The Treaty of Ghent had not gotten to the United States yet. Hostilities continued until late February. The war was put to an end when the U. S. received the peace treaty.