Chapter 4-5

Timeline created by Zachary Vandyck
In History
  • 6

    Augustus makes Judah a Roman Province

    Augustus makes Judah a Roman Province
    It was named after Herod Archelaus's Tetrarchy of Judea, but the Roman province encompassed a much larger territory. The name "Judea" was derived from the Kingdom of Judah
  • 64

    Romans allow Christianity

    Romans allow Christianity
    Over time, the Christian church and faith grew more organized. In 313 AD, the Emperor Constantine issued the Edict of Milan, which accepted Christianity: 10 years later, it had become the official religion of the Roman Empire.
  • 135

    Romans force Jews out of Jerusalem

    Romans force Jews out of Jerusalem
    Siege of Jerusalem, Roman military blockade of Jerusalem during the First Jewish Revolt. The fall of the city marked the effective conclusion of a four-year campaign against the Jewish insurgency in Judea. The Romans destroyed much of the city, including the Second Temple.
  • 312

    Constantine accepts Christianity

    Constantine accepts Christianity
    During the reign of the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (AD 306–337), Christianity began to transition to the dominant religion of the Roman Empire. ... If this made him a Christian is the subject of ... debate," although he allegedly received a baptism shortly before his death.
  • 392

    Christianity becomes an official religion of rome

    Christianity becomes an official religion of rome
    The result of this council was the Nicene Creed, which laid out the agreed upon beliefs of the council. In 380 CE, the emperor Theodosius issued the Edict of Thessalonica, which made Christianity, specifically Nicene Christianity, the official religion of the Roman Empire.
  • 567

    Monks bring Christianity to Britain

    Monks bring Christianity to Britain
    The arrival of the Anglo-Saxons in Britain seems to have almost wiped out Christianity, but in the 590s Pope Gregory I developed a plan to convert the Anglo-Saxons. ... Augustine converted King Æthelberht to Christianity and established a church at Canterbury from which he began to convert the people of Kent.
  • 622

    Muhammad goes to Madinah

    Muhammad goes to Madinah
    Muhammad instructed his followers to emigrate to Medina until virtually all of his followers had left Mecca. Being alarmed at the departure of Muslims, according to the tradition, the Meccans plotted to assassinate him. ... Following the emigration, the Meccans seized the properties of the Muslim emigrants in Mecca.
  • 661

    Umayyad established Damascus as capital

    Umayyad established Damascus as capital
    The Barada River flows through Damascus. First settled in the second millennium BC, it was chosen as the capital of the Umayyad Caliphate from 661 to 750. After the victory of the Abbasid dynasty, the seat of Islamic power was moved to Baghdad.
  • 900

    Al-Razi writes medical texts

    Al-Razi writes medical texts
    The Persian physician al-Razi (ca. 865-925), also known as Rhazes, prepared compilations that were influential in Western medicine for centuries. His monograph on smallpox and measles is still considered a medical classic.
  • 900

    Baghdad is center of Islamic culture

    Baghdad is center of Islamic culture
    Why was Baghdad important? The Abbasid Caliphate established their capital in the city of Baghdad in 762CE. Over the next five centuries Islamic culture flourished and Baghdad became renowned as a centre of learning and tolerance. ... This period is known as the Golden Age of Islam.
  • 1258

    Mongols burn Baghdad

    Mongols burn Baghdad
    The Siege of Baghdad, which lasted from January 29 until February 10, 1258, entailed the investment, capture, and sack of Baghdad, the capital of the Abbasid Caliphate, by Ilkhanate Mongol forces and allied troops. The Mongols were under the command of Hulagu Khan
  • 1500

    Suleiman 1 rules Ottoman Empire

    Suleiman 1 rules Ottoman Empire
    While Sultan Suleiman was known as "the Magnificent" in the West, he was always Kanuni Suleiman or "The Lawgiver" (قانونی) to his own Ottoman subjects. ... The overriding law of the empire was the Shari'ah, or Sacred Law, which as the divine law of Islam was outside of the Sultan's powers to change.
  • Period:
    6
    to
    1500

    A.D.