1700-1799

Timeline created by KaShelton
  • Kentucky Gains Statehood

    Kentucky entered the Union as a free state. (YAWP, Chapter 13, The Sectional Crisis)
  • First Comprehensive Slave Code

    The first comprehensive slave code was passed by the House of Burgesses, which would allow slave owners to do whatever they wanted to their slaves in order to maximize profits. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • Slave Rebellion in New York

    In 1712, a slave rebellion in New York City resulted in the deaths of nine whites. In response, twenty-one slaves were executed and six died by suicide before they could be burned alive. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
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    Yamasee Rebellion

    The Yamasee tribe rebelled against English colonists, almost destroying Charleston. They thought the English were planning an attack on them when they weren't able to trade for weapons anymore. It ended with an English victory, only because of Charleston's Cherokee allies. (YAWP, Chapter 3, British North America)
  • Jonathan Edwards' "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"

    Jonathan Edwards preached his most famous sermon, "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God." This sermon was printed in pamphlets, and would light the flames of the beginning of religious revivals. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • Walking Purchase of 1737

    The Walking Purchase of 1737 showed both the colonists' desire for cheap land and the changing relationship between the Natives and the English. Native leaders agreed to sell as much land as a man could walk in a day and a half. (YAWP, Chapter 3, British North America)
  • Stono Rebellion

    Around 80 slaves ran away from their enslavers in an act that became known as the Stono Rebellion. They burned plantations and killed at least twenty whites on their way to Spanish territory, before they were killed. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • George Washington Kills a French Diplomat

    A group of Englishmen and Natives led by a young George Washington killed a French diplomat. This event would start the Seven Years' War. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
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    Seven Years' War

    The Seven Years' War, or French and Indian War, was fought between France and their Native allies and England. It ended with an English victory. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • Prussia Invades Saxony

    British-allied Frederick II of Prussia invaded the neutral state of Saxony, which marked the beginning of the Seven Years' War in Europe. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • Fort William Henry Burned

    The French burned Fort William Henry, a British outpost, during the Seven Years' War. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • Siege of Louisbourg

    The French port and fortress of Louisbourg in Nova Scotia fell to the English as part of the Seven Years' War. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • Battle of the Plains of Abraham

    British general James Wolfe defeated French general Louis-Joseph de Montcalm in the Battle of the Plains of Abraham, outside Quebec City. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • British Capture Montreal

    The British captured Montreal, effectively ending war in North America. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • British Capture Quebec

    England captured the French Quebec in 1760, which was met with much celebration for the English colonists. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • King George III Becomes King

    King George III took the Crown, and brought Tories into his government after three decades of Whig rule. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Neolin Receives a Vision

    The Native American prophet Neolin claimed to receive a vision from the Master of Life, telling him to expel the British from America. This caused the Native leader Pontiac to attack the British, starting Pontiac's War. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • Spain Entered the Seven Years' War

    Spain entered the Seven Years' War in 1762, and fought against the British. They successfully defended Guatemala against England, but lost Cuba and the Philippines. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • Peace Treaties of Paris and Hubertusburg

    The peace treaties of Paris and Hubertusburg were signed in 1763, which marked the end of the Seven Years' War.
  • Siege on Fort Detroit

    Native Americans tried to take Fort Detroit by surprise, but they failed, so instead the fort was sieged for six months. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • Royal Proclamation

    The Royal Proclamation forbade colonial settlement west of the Appalachian mountains in what was the first major postwar imperial action targeting North America. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Currency Act

    Parliament issued the Currency Act, which restricted colonies from producing paper money. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Sugar Act

    The Sugar Act cut the duty of molasses in half but increased enforcement. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Stamp Act

    Parliament passed the Stamp Act, requiring documents to be stamped to show that the duty had been paid. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Stamp Act Congress

    The Stamp Act Congress was a meeting of delegates from nine colonies in New York City to discuss the Stamp Act. They wrote a "Declaration of Rights and Grievances" pledging allegiance to Britain but demanding the same rights as British citizens. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • End of Pontiac's War

    Pontiac's War ended when Pontiac met with British official William Johnson at Fort Ontario and negotiated for peace. After the war, the British realized that Native lands would have to be protected if the colonists wanted peace. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • Townshend Acts

    The Townshend Acts placed taxes on common and necessary items, like lead, tea, and glass. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Boston Massacre

    Five British soldiers fired on a crowd that was harassing them, killing five Bostonians. This was met with outrage by the colonies. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Regulating Act

    Parliament passed the Regulating Act, effectively placing colonies under direct British control. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Tea Act

    The Tea Act allowed the East India Company to sell tea directly to the colonies. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Boston Tea Party

    When British ships holding large amounts of tea were unable to return to England without emptying their load, dozens of men disguised as Mohawk Indians dumped 342 chests into the harbour. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Coercive Acts

    The Coercive Acts, also known as the Intolerable Acts, were four laws passed by Parliament after the Boston Tea Party. It included the Boston Port Act, the Massachusetts Government Act, Administration of Justice Act, and the Quartering Act. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Battle of Bunker Hill

    The Battle of Bunker Hill was fought between the British and patriots. When the militia set up fortification on Breed's Hill, the British attempted to dislodge them from the position. The patriots won. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Battle of Lexington and Concord

    British regiments set out to seize local militias' arms and powder stores at Lexington and Concord, but were stopped on the way by the militia. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • First Continental Congress

    Elite delegates from every colony (but Georgia) came together to write a "Declaration of Rights and Grievances" at the First Continental Congress. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Thomas Paine's "Common Sense" Printed

    Thomas Paine's revolutionary pamphlet "Common Sense" was printed by printer Robert Bell. (YAWP, Chapter 4, Colonial Society)
  • America Declares Independence

    Congress approved the Declaration of Independence, proclaiming that America was no longer part of the British Empire. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Battle of Yorktown

    In October, Washington's and the French's siege on British General Cornwallis, forcing his surrender. This was the last major stand of the British army. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • Articles of Confederation

    The Articles of Confederation, passed by the Continental Congress, allowed each state one vote in the Congress. (YAWP, Chapter 5, The American Revolution)
  • American Revolution Ended

    Peace negotiations taking place in France between America and Britain brought the war to an official end.
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    Shay's Rebellion

    The "Shaysites", led by Daniel Shays, was a group of farmers in debt. They struggled under the weak local and national economies, signaling to Congress that a change had to be made. (YAWP, Chapter 6, A New Nation)
  • Constitution Ratified

    Congress announced that a majority of states had ratified the Constitution and it was now in effect.
  • French Revolution Began

    Americans received word that France had revolted against their king. (YAWP, Chapter 6, A New Nation)
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    George Washington's Presidency

    George Washington was president, with vice president John Adams. (YAWP, Chapter 6, A New Nation)
  • Bill of Rights

    Ten amendments were added to the Constitution, composing the Bill of Rights. (YAWP, Chapter 6, A New Nation)
  • Vermont Gains Statehood

    Vermont entered the Union as a free state. (YAWP, Chapter 13, The Sectional Crisis)
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    Haitian Revolution

    The Haitian Revolution was a successful slave revolt against French colonial rule in the West Indies. (YAWP, Chapter 6, A New Nation)
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    Whiskey Rebellion

    Farmers attacked tax collectors and federal marshals because of Hamilton's whiskey tax. (YAWP, Chapter 6, A New Nation)
  • Jay's Treaty

    John Jay signed a "treaty of amity, commerce, and navigation" with the British, calling for the British to abandon its military positions in the Northwest territory and for the U.S. to treat Britain as its most prized trade partner. (YAWP, Chapter 6, A New Nation)
  • Cotton Gin

    The cotton gin was created by Eli Whitney for deseeding cotton, which caused the cotton boom. (YAWP, Chapter 10, Religion and Reform)
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    James Madison's Presidency

    Federalist John Adams defeated Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson, who became his vice president. (YAWP, Chapter 6, A New Nation)
  • Alien and Sedition Acts

    These acts were a result of the French Quasi-War and the French Revolution. The Alien Act allowed the federal government to deport foreign nationals. The Sedition Act allowed the government to prosecute anyone speaking out against the government. (YAWP, Chapter 6, A New Nation)