Timeline: US Foreign Policy

Timeline created by JohnyyaL
In History
  • Timeline: US Foreign Policy

    Timeline: US Foreign Policy
    The foreign policy of the United States is its interactions with foreign nations and how it sets standards of interaction for its organizations, corporations, and system citizens of the United States.
  • James Madison

    James Madison
    He was a federalist at heart, thus campaigned for a strong central government. In the Virginia Plan, he expressed his ideas about forming a three-part federal government, consisting of executive, legislative and judicial branches Madison's foreign policies were guided by his republican ideals and his faith in the strength of the expanding U.S. economy. As Secretary of State, he cooperated closely with President Jefferson who kept close control over key decisions.
  • Monroe Doctrine

    Monroe Doctrine
    The Monroe Doctrine is the best known U.S. policy toward the Western Hemisphere. Buried in a routine annual message delivered to Congress by President James Monroe in December 1823, the doctrine warns European nations that the United States would not tolerate further colonization or puppet monarchs. U.S. policy toward the Western Hemisphere. Buried in a routine annual message delivered to Congress by President James Monroe in December 1823, the doctrine warns European nations
  • War of 1812

    War of 1812
    War of 1812, (June 18, 1812–February 17, 1815), conflict fought between the United States and Great Britain over British violations of U.S. maritime rights. In the War of 1812, the United States took on the greatest naval power in the world, Great Britain, in a conflict that would have an immense impact on the young country's future. ... The ratification of the Treaty of Ghent on February 17, 1815, ended the war but left many of the most contentious questions unresolved.
  • James Monroe

    James Monroe
    Versaw major westward expansion of the U.S. and strengthened American foreign policy in 1823 with the Monroe Doctrine, a warning to European countries against further colonization and intervention in the Western Hemisphere. Monroe administration wanted to improve relations with Britain. Toward that end, it negotiated two important accords with Britain that resolved border disputes held over from the War of 1812.
  • James K. Polk

    James K. Polk
    residency, foreign policy revolved around the U.S. desire for additional territory in North America. Even before the Revolutionary War, Americans had looked westward, and in the early years of the republic, the United States had expanded its borders toward and then beyond the Mississippi River.
  • Mexican American War

    Mexican American War
    The Mexican-American War (1846-1848) marked the first U.S. armed conflict chiefly fought on foreign soil. It pitted a politically divided and militarily unprepared Mexico against the expansionist-minded administration of U.S. President James K. The Mexican-American War, waged between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848, helped to fulfill America's "manifest destiny" to expand its territory across the entire North American continent.
  • The Trent Affair

    The Trent Affair
    On November 8, 1861, Charles Wilkes, a U.S. Navy Officer, captured two Confederate envoys aboard the British mail ship, the Trent. Great Britain accused the United States of violating British neutrality, and the incident created a diplomatic crisis between the United States and Great Britain during the Civil War. Navy Officer, captured two Confederate envoys aboard the British mail ship, the Trent. Great Britain accused the United States of violating British neutrality
  • Lincoln

    Lincoln
    Presidents, Lincoln was a moral hero not only to his own people but to struggling radicals everywhere. In a fine work of narrative history, which combines in rare fashion humor, imagination, and scholarly research, Jay Monaghan reminds us of Lincoln's importance as a world figure. He was afraid that the need for cotton, fear of Northern tariff policies, and the desire to split a potential rival would cause England to support the Confederacy,
  • Spanish American War

    Spanish American War
    The Spanish-American War was an 1898 conflict between the United States and Spain that ended Spanish colonial rule in the Americas and resulted in U.S. acquisition of territories in the western Pacific and Latin America. The Spanish-American War of 1898 ended Spain's colonial empire in the Western Hemisphere and secured the position of the United States as a Pacific power. ... The United States also annexed the independent state of Hawaii during the conflict.
  • Annexation of Hawaii

    Annexation of Hawaii
    America's annexation of Hawaii in 1898 extended U.S. territory into the Pacific and highlighted resulted from economic integration and the rise of the United States as a Pacific power. During the 1830s, Britain and France forced Hawaii to accept treaties giving them economic privileges America's annexation of Hawaii in 1898 extended U.S. territory into the Pacific and highlighted resulted from economic integration and the rise of the United States as a Pacific power.
  • William Howard Taft

    William Howard Taft
    was more committed to the expansion of U.S. foreign trade than was Roosevelt. He pursued a program, known as "dollar diplomacy," designed to encourage U.S. investments in South and Central American, the Caribbean, and the Far East. Taft's policies created some troubles that were immediate and others that would not bear fruit until decades later. The tremendous debts in Central America created years of economic instability there and fostered nationalist movements driven by resentment of America
  • World War I

    World War I
    The immediate cause of World War I that made the aforementioned items come into play (alliances, imperialism, militarism, nationalism) was the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary. In June 1914, a Serbian-nationalist terrorist group called the Black Hand sent groups to assassinate the Archduke. The U.S. made its major contributions in terms of supplies, raw material, and money, starting in 1917. During the war the U.S. mobilized over 4 million military people
  • Panama Canal

    Panama Canal
    The Panama Canal is a constructed waterway that connects the Atlantic and Pacific oceans across the Isthmus of Panama. It is owned and administered by Panama, and it is 40 miles long from the shoreline to shoreline. Ships can cross going in either direction, and it takes about 10 hours to get from one side to the other. Americans knew they needed this to move ships from east to west quickly. If they did that, they would control power because they would control the oceans.
  • Woodrow Wilson

    Woodrow Wilson
    In order to curb the growth of imperialism, and spread democracy, Wilson came up with the idea of moral diplomacy. Wilson's moral diplomacy replaced the dollar diplomacy of William Howard Taft, which highlighted the importance of economic support to improve bilateral ties between the two nations.
  • Roosevelt

    Roosevelt
    Though often recognized for the aggressiveness of his foreign policy, President, Roosevelt wanted to increase the influence and prestige of the United States on the world stage and make the country a global power. He also believed that the exportation of American values and ideals would have an ennobling effect on the world.
  • Exclusively Expansionistic

    Exclusively Expansionistic
    In expansionism, governments and states expand their territory, power, wealth, or influence through economic growth, soft power, or the military aggression of empire-building and colonialism. State-collapse anarchy, reunification, or pan-nationalism are sometimes used to justify and legitimize expansionism, but only when the ... Further information As the 19th century wore on, only industrialists kept the Canadian idea alive; neither the. Overseas expansion