Period 7 Part 1

  • Japan

    Japan
    American Commodore Matthew Perry led his four ships into the harbor at Tokyo Bay, seeking to re-establish for the first time in over 200 years regular trade and discourse between Japan and the western world.
  • Alaska

    Alaska
    Secretary of State William Seward bought Alaska from Russia for $7.2 Million
  • Alfred Thayer Mahan

    Alfred Thayer Mahan
    A lecturer in naval history and the president of the United States Naval War College published The Influence of Sea Power upon History, a revolutionary analysis of the importance of naval power as a factor in the rise of the British Empire.
  • Hawaii

    Hawaii
    American businessmen basically overthrew Queen Lili'uokalani and established their own government. The Cleveland administration said the actions were illegal, but Hawaii was annexed by the U.S. under President McKinley
  • Hawaii

    Hawaii
    Hawaii was annexed to the United States in 1898 when Queen Liliuokalani tried to restore the power of monarchy after the death of King Kalakaua. One reason was because Hawaii played an important role in the interest of US's economy
  • Hawaii

    Hawaii
    U.S. first got involved in 1875 when a treaty was signed between the U.S. and Hawaii. ... Instead, the U.S. waited 5 years until they set up a second treaty of annexation with the new Hawaiian government. On July 7th, 1898, the U.S. annexed Hawaii due to war needs.
  • Spanish-American War

    Spanish-American War
    United States assisted in war to protect its citizens and businesses in Cuba.
  • Spanish-American War

    Spanish-American War
    The United States declared war on Spain after the U.S. warship, the Maine, exploded and sank on February 15, 1898 while visiting Havana, Cuba.
  • Spanish-American War

    Spanish-American War
    The Treaty of Paris, ending the Spanish-American War, was signed on December 10. Spain gave up Guam, Puerto Rico, its possessions in the West Indies, and the Philippines in exchange for a U.S. payment of $20 million
  • Spanish American War

    Spanish American War
    The United States occupied Cuba but, as provided for in the Teller Amendment, did not try to annex
  • Spanish American War

    Spanish American War
    Ended Spanish colonial rule in the Americas and resulted in U.S. acquisition of territories in the western Pacific and Latin America.
  • Spanish American War

    Spanish American War
    Spain’s brutally repressive measures to halt the rebellion were graphically portrayed for the U.S. public by several sensational newspapers, and American sympathy for the Cuban rebels rose.
  • Spanish American War

    Spanish American War
    The ensuing war was pathetically one-sided, since Spain had readied neither its army nor its navy for a distant war with the formidable power of the United States.
  • Spanish American War

    Spanish American War
    The Spanish-American War was an important turning point in the history of both antagonists. Spain’s defeat decisively turned the nation’s attention away from its overseas colonial adventures and inward upon its domestic needs, a process that led to both a cultural and a literary renaissance and two decades of much-needed economic development in Spain.
  • Philippine-American War

    Philippine-American War
    An insurrection that may be seen as a continuation of the Philippine Revolution against Spanish rule. ... The war began with shooting on the outskirts of Manila on the night of February 4, 1899.
  • China

    China
    In 1900, China was heavily controlled by foreign nations who tended to dominate the ports such as Shanghai.
  • China

    China
    European nations also divided up China into spheres of influence and in these spheres the European nation involved all but ran it as U.S. and Japan seemingly looked on
  • Big Stick Diplomacy

    Big Stick Diplomacy
    policy of carefully mediated negotiation supported by the unspoken threat of a powerful military
  • Big Stick Diplomacy

    Big Stick Diplomacy
    Roosevelt used Big Stick diplomacy in many foreign policy situations. He brokered an agreement for an American-led canal through Panama, expanded American influence in Cuba, and negotiated a peace treaty between Russia and Japan.
  • Philippine-American War

    Philippine-American War
    After more than three years of fighting, at a cost of 400 million dollars and approximately 4,200 American dead and 2,900 wounded, President Theodore Roosevelt proclaimed an end to the insurrection in the Philippines
  • Panama Canal

    Panama Canal
    The canal was made to connect the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and it would move ships through easily instead of having to go all the way around South America
  • Panama Canal

    Panama Canal
    Panama Canal proved a vital component to expanding global trade routes in the 20th century
  • Dollar Diplomacy

    Dollar Diplomacy
    Encouraged American bankers and business men to make loans to foreign countries to further American commercial interests. ... Also to encourage and protect trade within Latin America and Asia
  • Mexico

    Mexico
    To aid revolutionaries fighting Huerta, Wilson called for an arms embargo against the Mexican government and sent a fleet to blockade the port of Vera Cruz. In 1914, several U.S. sailors went ashore at Tampico where they were arrested by Mexican authorities.
  • Mexico

    Mexico
    Pancho Villa led raids across the U.S.-Mexican border and murdered several people in Texas and New Mexico. In March 1916, President Wilson ordered General John J. Pershing and an "expeditionary force" to pursue Villa into northern Mexico.
  • World War 1

    World War 1
    After the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and lasted until 1918. During the conflict, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria and the Ottoman Empire fought against Great Britain, France, Russia, Italy, Romania, Japan and the United States
  • World War 1

    World War 1
    Thanks to new military technologies and the horrors of trench warfare, World War I saw unprecedented levels of carnage and destruction
  • World War 1

    World War 1
    On August 4, 1914, German troops crossed the border into Belgium. In the first battle of World War I, the Germans assaulted the heavily fortified city of Liege, using the most powerful weapons in their arsenal enormous siege cannons
  • World War 1

    World War 1
    United States remained on the sidelines of World War I, adopting the policy of neutrality favored by President Woodrow Wilson while continuing to engage in commerce and shipping with European countries on both sides of the conflict.
  • World War 1

    World War 1
    Widespread protest over the sinking by U-boat of the British ocean liner Lusitania traveling from New York to Liverpool, England with hundreds of American passengers on board in May 1915 helped turn the tide of American public opinion against Germany. In February 1917, Congress passed a $250 million arms appropriations bill intended to make the United States ready for war.
  • World War 1

    World War 1
    Defeat on the battlefield, combined with economic instability and the scarcity of food and other essentials, led to mounting discontent among the bulk of Russia’s population, especially the poverty-stricken workers and peasants.
  • World War 1

    World War 1
    At the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, Allied leaders would state their desire to build a post-war world that would safeguard itself against future conflicts of such devastating scale.
  • Red Scare

    Red Scare
    During the Red Scare of 1919-1920, many in the United States feared recent immigrants and dissidents, particularly those who embraced communist, socialist, or anarchist ideology.