Unit 7 Part 1

  • Alfred Thayer Mahan

    Alfred Thayer Mahan
    He was a naval officer and the most important American strategist of the 19th centuries
  • Alaska

    Alaska
    The US purchases Alaska from Russia for $7.2m
  • China

    China
    a subsequent series of treaties divvied up chunks of China between Russia and Japan, a continuation of the creation of European concessions like Hong Kong or the French settlement in Shanghai.
  • The Spanish-American War

    The Spanish-American War
    The Spanish-American War was an 1898 conflict between the United States and Spain that ended Spanish colonial rule in the Americas and resulted in U.S. acquisition of territories in the western Pacific and Latin America.
  • The Spanish-American War

    The Spanish-American War
    Spain announced an armistice on April 9 and speeded up its new program to grant Cuba limited powers of self-government.
  • The Spanish-American War

    The Spanish-American War
    Spain declared war on the United States on April 24, followed by a U.S. declaration of war on the 25th, which was made retroactive to April 21.
  • The Spanish-American War

    The Spanish-American War
    The ensuing war was pathetically one-sided, since Spain had readied neither its army nor its navy for a distant war with the formidable power of the United States.
  • The Spanish-American War

    The Spanish-American War
    Santiago surrendered to Shafter on July 17, thus effectively ending the brief but momentous war.
  • The Spanish-American War

    The Spanish-American War
    By the Treaty of Paris, Spain renounced all claim to Cuba, ceded Guam and Puerto Rico to the United States, and transferred sovereignty over the Philippines to the United States for $20 million.
  • The Spanish-American War

    The Spanish-American War
    Spain’s defeat decisively turned the nation’s attention away from its overseas colonial adventures and inward upon its domestic needs, a process that led to both a cultural and a literary renaissance and two decades of much-needed economic development in Spain.
  • The Spanish-American War

    The Spanish-American War
    The United States, emerged from the war a world power with far-flung overseas possessions and a new stake in international politics that would soon lead it to play a determining role in the affairs of Europe and the rest of the globe.
  • Philippine-American War

    Philippine-American War
    Fighting broke out between American forces and Filipino nationalists led by Emilio Aguinaldo who sought independence rather than a change in colonial rulers
  • Philippine-American War

    Philippine-American War
    The war started after revolutionaries seized the Philippines and led a revolt against America trying to take control of the republic
  • Big Stick Diplomacy

    United States Vice President Theodore Roosevelt outlined his ideal foreign policy in a speech at the Minnesota State Fair in Falcon Heights, Minnesota: “Speak softly, and carry a big stick.” Two weeks later, Roosevelt became president and “Big Stick diplomacy” defined his leadership.
  • Panama Canal

    Panama Canal
    The Panama Canal is a result of the U.S. government’s endeavor to build a canal across the Central American isthmus in order to reduce the time of sea travel between the eastern and western shores of North America
  • Panama Canal

    Panama Canal
    the potential threat to the canal by foreign powers during the war years had a major impact on the political and social life of Panama
  • Big Stick Diplomacy

    Big Stick Diplomacy
    President Roosevelt used Big Stick diplomacy in many foreign policy situations. He brokered an agreement for an American-led canal through Panama, expanded American influence in Cuba, and negotiated a peace treaty between Russia and Japan. For this, Roosevelt won the Nobel Peace Prize
  • Dollar Diplomacy

    Dollar Diplomacy
    Dollar Diplomacy, foreign policy created by U.S. Pres. William Howard Taft and his secretary of state, Philander C. Knox, to ensure the financial stability of a region while protecting and extending U.S. commercial and financial interests there.
  • China

    China
    in China, a wobbly republican state led by military general Yuan Shikai replaced the imperial system of governance
  • Japan

    Japan
    Japan declared war on Germany, keeping their alliance with Great Britain
  • World War I

    World War I
    The spark that ignited World War I was struck in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where Archduke Franz Ferdinand—heir to the Austro-Hungarian Empire—was shot to death along with his wife Sophie by the Serbian nationalist Gavrilo Princip
  • World War I

    World War I
    The severe effects that chemical weapons such as mustard gas and phosgene had on soldiers and civilians during World War I galvanized public and military attitudes against their continued use. The Geneva Convention agreements, signed in 1925, restricted the use of chemical and biological agents in warfare, and remains in effect today.
  • World War I

    World War I
    World War I has also been referred to as “the first modern war.” Many of the technologies we now associate with military conflict—machine guns, tanks, aerial combat and radio communications—were introduced on a massive scale during World War I.
  • World War I

    World War I
    World War I brought about massive social upheaval, as millions of women entered the workforce to support men who went to war, and to replace those who never came back.
  • World War I

    World War I
    In 1915, Germany declared the waters surrounding the British Isles to be a war zone, and German U-boats sunk several commercial and passenger vessels, including some U.S. ships.
  • Mexico

    Mexico
    Germany made several attempts to incite a war between Mexico and the U.S., seen especially in the Zimmermann Telegram affair in January 1917, where the aim was to draw the U.S. into conflict on its southern border rather than join Great Britain and France in the conflict against Germany and its allies.
  • Mexico

    Mexico
    Mexico rejected the proposal of a military alliance with Germany, and was at the same time able to prevent a permanent military invasion from the U.S., which wanted to take control of Tehuantepec Isthmus and Tampico oil fields.
  • Red Scare

    Red Scare
    hysteria over the perceived threat posed by Communists in the U.S. became known as the Red Scare. The Red Scare led to a range of actions that had a profound and enduring effect on U.S. government and society.
  • World War I

    World War I
    Austria-Hungary, dissolving from within due to growing nationalist movements among its diverse population, reached an armistice on November 4. Germany was finally forced to seek an armistice on November 11, 1918, ending World War I.
  • World War I

    World War I
    Some hopeful participants had begun calling World War I “the War to End All Wars.” But the Treaty of Versailles, signed on June 28, 1919, would not achieve that lofty goal