The romans

The Romans

  • 100

    27 B.C. to 180 A.D.

    27 B.C. to 180 A.D.
    Beginning with the rule of Augustus, Rome was at the peak of its power. With the exception of fighting with tribes along the borders, the empire was with peace. The Roman empire had grown very large, with it covering over 3 million square miles and holding 60 to 80 million inhabitants.
  • 150

    60 B.C.

    60 B.C.
    Caesar, a solid leader, who was smart when making military descisions, joined forces with Crassus and Pompey. The next year, he was elected consul and dominated Rome, along with Pompey and Crassus, for the following 10 years. Caesar earned his men's devotion and loyalty, because he took his full share in hardships of war.
  • 264

    264 B.C.

    264 B.C.
    The Punic War began with Rome and Carthage going to war against each other, fighting three wars. The first war was over control of Sicily and the western part of the Mediterranean, with the second war with a Carthaginian general, named Hannibal, wanting to avenge Carthage's earlier defeat. The third war was when Rome tried to destroy Carthage.
  • 265

    265 B.C.

    265 B.C.
    The Romans are now the leaders of all of Rome, except Po Valley. Different parts of its conquered territories had different laws and treatments, though. The newer citizens of Rome, like the Latins, and more allies add to Rome's growing size.
  • 390

    390 B.C.

    390 B.C.
    A Celtic group of people from the Po River Valley, known as the Gauls, destroyed Rome. The Romans reconstructed the city, thought, quickly recovering. By subduing many river, they established control, and they defeat the Etruscans and the city-states of Greece.
  • 451

    451 B.C.

    451 B.C.
    Because there were no laws written down, patrician officials frequently translated the law in a way that suited themselves. Therefore, ten officials wrote down Rome's laws on twelve tablets, which were hung in the Forum. The laws were the basis for Roman law, later on, and provided that all free, Roman citizens had the right to protect Roman law.
  • 509

    509 B.C.

    509 B.C.
    Tarquin the Proud, a harsh tyrant, was the last king of Rome. He had been overthrown by Roman aristocrats, wealthy landowners who were against Etruscan kings. The Romans decided never again to have a monarchy government; instead, they turned to a republic governement, which is run by the people and for the people.
  • Jan 1, 600

    600 B.C.

    600 B.C.
    Even though the Etruscan cities did not control Rome, an Etruscan became king. Under the rule of many Etruscan kings, Rome grew into a city covering 500 square feet. Lots of the land in Rome was agricultural land, and yet many different kings also ordered temples and public buildings to be built.
  • Jan 1, 750

    1000-500 B.C.

    1000-500 B.C.
    The Latins, the Greeks, and the Etruscans inhabited the region and battled over the region later on. The Latins were farmers and shepherds, who into Italy across the Alps. The Greeks established 50 colonies on the coasts of southern Italy and Sicily, teaching the Romans how to grow grapes and olives, and the Etruscans native to northern Italy, while allowing Rome to adopt their alphabet.
  • Jan 1, 753

    753 B.C.

    753 B.C.
    Based on the Roman legend, Romulus and Remus, twin sons of the god Mars and a Latin princess, founded the city. Because the twins were abandoned on the Tiber River when they were only infants and then raised by a wolf, they built the city nearby. It was built midway between the southern tip of Italy and the Alps on seven rolling hills at one curve on the Tiber River, also near the Mediterranean Sea.