36c2c71fdae04c70d4d04b28fc0c0887

Sccuesses and Failures of Chinese Dynasties

By KadeL.
  • Jan 1, 1100

    Temujin

    Temujin
    A powerful Khan named Temujin began uniting the Mongol clans while simultaneously cconquering his rivals in the late 1100's. This was in an atempt to become a very powerful force.
  • Jan 1, 1200

    Monolian Army

    Monolian Army
    Thousands of soldiers accompanied by their families marched in divisions of 10,000. Stretching as far as 50 miles wide, the nomadic Mongols would only cover 100 miles a day. Strike forces led the army while scouts bought up the rear making the Mongolian army truly powerful.
  • Jan 1, 1200

    The Mongols

    The Mongols
    During the Song Dynasty in the 1200'a, a nomadic people emrged from Central Asia. They were called the Mongols, and in time, they would conquer China and create the largest Empire in the world.
  • Jan 1, 1206

    Genghis Khan

    Genghis Khan
    Genghis Khan, which means " Universal Ruler," was the tilte given to Temujin for uniting the Mongol clans. With this unity, Genghis Khan founded an empire with a fierce army and a strict ruling.
  • Jan 1, 1207

    Mongol Rule

    Mongol Rule
    The Mongols rule for 20 years under Genghis Khan's power and conquer much of Asia. Through their fighiting, they learnd siege warfare -- The surrounding or blockading of a city, town, or fortress by an army attempting to catpure it -- and the use of gunpowder.
  • Jan 1, 1227

    Genhig Khan's Death

    Genhig Khan's Death
    Genghis Khan dies and the empire is given to his sons. The empire was then split in to four regions, each with it's own heir to and a great Khan ruled over all.
  • Jan 1, 1235

    Conquest

    Conquest
    Kublai Khan begins a conquest of China.
  • Jan 1, 1236

    Golden Horde

    Golden Horde
    Genghis Khan's grandson, Batu, attacked and conquered Russia, Poland, Hugnary, and Eastern Europe using the Golden Horde -- Army that took over Russia, Poland, Hugnary, and Eastern Europe.-- These great conquerings were to expand the already great Mongol Empire.
  • Jan 1, 1260

    Kublai Khan

    Kublai Khan
    Kublai Khan became great Khan of the Mongol Empire. He was determined to finish the conquest he had begun earlier. He would go on to defeat nearly all of China.
  • Jan 1, 1278

    Marco Polo

    Marco Polo
    Beginning in 1278, Marco Polo traveled in and around China for 17n years fulfilling missions given to him by Kublai Khan. Kublai Khan gave him these missions because he took a liking to the young Italian man when he came to China with his father.
  • Jan 1, 1279

    The Goodbye "Song"

    The Goodbye "Song"
    After years of the Song dynasty resisting the Mongols, the final Song ruler was defeated. Kublai Khan then decalred himself emperor of his newly created dynasty, the Yuan dynasty, and ruled all of China. --The Song dynasty was the dynasty that controlled Southern China during the time of the Mongols. The Song greatly resisted the Mongol invaders for years before defeat.--
  • Jan 1, 1294

    The Yuan Weakening

    The Yuan Weakening
    Through miltary losses from the Japanese and the Kamikazi --actually meaning "divine wind," the kamakazi were great stroms which saved the Japanese from being defeated by the Mongols. Yet the meaning has changed through time and it currently means, "suicide bomber."-- and the weakened economy of the Mongols left them vulnerable for rebelions. At this time, in 1294, Kublai Khan died and the Yuan dynasty weakend even more.
  • Jan 1, 1295

    Polo's Tales of China

    Polo's Tales of China
    In 1295, Marco Polo and his fathered returned home to Venice. It wasn't long after that that he was captured and imprisoned where he wrote a book about the greatness of China. His tales intrigued many of the Europeans.
  • Jan 1, 1300

    Black Death

    Black Death
    Black Death -- A plague that was based off of the inclenliness of people -- wipes out much of Europe.
  • Jan 1, 1300

    Rebellions Against the Yuan

    Rebellions Against the Yuan
    As the Yuan dynasty weakened, people began to notice, Some took advantage of this, and threoughout the 1300's, people began to rebel during the Dynasty's most vulnerable time.
  • Jan 1, 1368

    The Mongol Flee

    The Mongol Flee
    After a rebel army defeated the Mongols in 1368, the Mongols fled to Manchuria. This marked the end of Mongol rule in China.
  • Jan 1, 1368

    The Ming Dynasty

    The Ming Dynasty
    After a peasant named Zhu Yuanzhang and his rebel army overthrew the Mongols, Zhu founded the Ming (Ming means "brilliant") dynasty and took the name Hongwu, meaning "vastly martial."This great dynasty lasted for nearly 300 years. In that time, Hongwu spent his entire life restoring China to its traditional ways and back to a prosperous country.
  • Jan 1, 1398

    Hongwu's Death

    Hongwu's Death
    In 1398, Hongwu died and the Ming dynasty fell in to a power struggle until Hongwu's son, Yonglo, took power.
  • Jan 1, 1400

    The Forbidden City

    The Forbidden City
    The Forbidden City --A great city inside of a city that got its name because Chinese commoners were not aloud to enter it.-- in the heart of Beijing was built for China's Ming emperor and hsi family, court, and servants in the early 1400's. The city was ssurrounded by a 35 foot high wall and included many great imperial buildings.
  • Jan 1, 1402

    Yonglo

    Yonglo
    Following the power struggle caused by hsi father's death, Yonglo took power of the Ming dynasty in 1402. Yonglo moved the Ming capital to Beijing and there, he built the Forbidden City. YOnglo also sponsored oversea voyages in hopes of spreading China's influence.
  • Jan 1, 1405

    Oversea Voyages with Zheng He

    Oversea Voyages with Zheng He
    With Yonglo's oversea sponsorings, Zheng He, a Chinese Muslim admiral, led seven sea voyages around the India ocean. Zheng He led each one with 300 ships to show China's power. Among those were 400 foot long treasure ships and junks. --junks were the Chinese trading ships, and they are still used today-- Sheng He always offered gifts from China, and in return, tribute was sent to the Chinese emperor from many foreign leaders.
  • Jan 1, 1424

    The End of Yonglo

    The End of Yonglo
    After creating the magnificient Forbidden City and influencing more oversea travels, Yonglo's ruling came to an end in 1424.
  • Dec 13, 1433

    No More Sea Voyages

    No More Sea Voyages
    Although the sea voyages represented Ming China's sea power, it was put to an end in 1433 by a new emperor becasue they were extremely expensive and because Chinese officials believed that the resources would be better used as defense for the frontiers. This policy started to lead towards the isolation of China from the outside world.
  • Jan 1, 1500

    Isolation

    Isolation
    In the 1500's, the isolation of China was at full force. Trade between all but a few foreign merchants was illegal. This, of cousre, was a hard policy to enforce and Chinese smugglers constantly found their way around it. The other reason for the Isolation was to protect against the influences of Europen traders and Christian missionaries because the Ming did not like their influences and they sought to preserve China's traditions.
  • Jan 1, 1500

    Prosperity

    Prosperity
    Although China had a few struggles at this time, it also had great prosperity. From the improved irrigation system, farming was also improved. Giant crops of rice and other crops brought from the American's (such as corn and sweet potatoes) flourished. A stable food supply led to a growing population which in turn brought greater production of goods, yet China remained a mainly agricultural society.
  • Jan 1, 1500

    The Ming Decline

    The Ming Decline
    In the late 1500's, many weak rulers took the throne and corruption increased which drained the treusury of all of its money. Ming rulers in turn raised taxes which led to the Ming decline.
  • China's Troubles

    China's Troubles
    Even against the emperor's wishes, some Europeans gained influence and respect in China. One of those people was Matteo Ricci, an Italian Jesuit priest. In 1583 he gained enough respect to get entry to the Ming court where he introduced European science and math. At this time, the Ming also faced the threat of the Mongols from the north. In defense, the Ming expanded the Great Wall of China. --a massive defensive wall which stretched 3,930 miles long and had watch towers every 100 yards--
  • Rebellions

    Rebellions
    The high taxes from the corrupt rulers combined with crop failures led to hardships and troubling times for the Ming dynasty. From then, rebellions began to brekaout .
  • Fall of the Ming

    Fall of the Ming
    As the Ming weakened, the Manchu (people from Manchuria) saw their chance to take over. In 1644, they swiftly marched in to Beijing and took the capital. After the Last Ming emperor killed himself, the Manchu formed their own dynasty, the Qing dynasty.
  • The Qing Dynasty

    The Qing Dynasty
    The newly founded Qing dynasty would rule for nearly over 250 years and in that time, they would again make China prosperous and expand it to it largest size in history. At the same time though, the Qing were in fact Manchu, not Chinese so they made sure to keep themselves seperate using certain restrictions. One was that Manchu were not aloud to marry Chinese, Another was that men had to wear their hear in the Manchu style: Shaved in the front with a queue --a braid-- in the back.
  • Kangxi

    Kangxi
    Kangxi was an outstanding Qing ruler. He ruled began in 1661 and during his ruling, he had great success. First, he reduced taxes for peasant sand expanded the empire in to Central Asia. He also supported the arts and liked learning from the highly intelligent Jesuit priests. In 1722, Kangxi died and his rule came to an end.
  • Qianlong

    Qianlong
    Qianlong, the grandson of Kangxi, began his rule in 1736 and as an emperor, brought China to its height. Qianlong conquered Taiwan, Tibet, and Mongolia making the empire of China the largest ever. Agriculture during Qianlong's reign also flourished and China's population bursted. At this time, the Chinese economy also thrived. Qianlong continued the Ming policy of isolation. Believing that there goods were superior, China only traded with those who agreed to their terms.
  • Population Explotion

    Population Explotion
    As the agriculture became great, so did the population. By 1750, the population of China surged to over 300 million. From this, the economy improved as well.
  • Lord George Macartney

    Lord George Macartney
    Along with many other Europeans, Lord George Macartney, a British official, came to China to try and persuade Qianlong to expand trade. The Chinese found that his goods were inferior to theirs. In addition, the chinese demanded that Macartney respected their emperor by kowtowing. --kneeling in front of the emperor and touching the forhead to the grounf nine times-- When Macartney refused, he was sent away.
  • Qianlong's Death

    Qianlong's Death
    After a long and great ruling of China, the great emperor Qianlong died in 1796.
  • The End of Imperial Rule

    The End of Imperial Rule
    During it's time, China was one of the most advanced civilizations in the world. Yet, the idea of Isolation, while being good for prserving Chinese traditions, kept China from keeping up with European advances. With that, the Europeans attempted yet again in the 1800's to open China's closed society. This eventually brought an end to the great Qing dynasty and to imperial rule itself.