Lifetime Personal Health Assignment: 20s through 60s

Timeline created by wellHello
  • Healthy Eating in your 20s

    Healthy Eating in your 20s
    Avoid fast food and processed foods and eat a balanced diet to reduce your risk for chronic diseases like diabetes, eating sufficient fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Ensure that your diet includes necessary nutrients such as protein and folic acid, or take a supplement as recommended by your health care provider. These first years of living independently often set the tone for your diet over the course of your life or affect your health for years to come.
  • Physical Activity in Your 20s

    Physical Activity in Your 20s
    Exercise regularly (at least 30 minutes most days of the week, with variances in your exercise routine) in your 20s to maintain a healthy weight. Ensure bone-building exercises (such as hiking) are included in your routine to reduce your risk for osteoporosis, as bone mass peaks in your 20s.
  • Preventive and Routine Healthcare in your 20s

    Preventive and Routine Healthcare in your 20s
    Find a primary care provider and medical specialists and try to have a medical checkup at least once every two years, as well as regular dental and gynecological (for women)/testicular (for men) visits and comprehensive eye exams. If you are at increased risk for conditions such as high cholesterol or certain cancers, ensure that you are screened for such. Protect your skin from skin cancer by using sunscreen and avoiding tanning salons.
  • Special Concerns/Avoiding Risks in your 20s

    Special Concerns/Avoiding Risks in your 20s
    Take special note and care of your sexual and mental health in your twenties, as these are at increased risk during this time period due to a changing life and increased sexual activity. Additionally, take care to avoid unnecessary risks by not smoking, drinking in moderation, wearing a helmet while on a motorcycle or bike, and never drinking or using your phone while driving.
  • Healthy Eating in your 30s

    As metabolism begins to slow in your 30s, eating a healthy diet will ensure that you feel your best and avoid being overweight or obese. This diet should include vegetables, fruits, whole
    grains, lean protein and low- or nonfat dairy products. Also make sure to get the recommended daily dose of vitamins to stay healthy for a longer period of time and to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet.
  • Physical Activity in your 30s

    Physical Activity in your 30s
    Regular exercise will ensure you remain healthy and feeling good throughout your thirties and will reduce your risk of chronic disease later. The recommended amount is 60 minutes of physical activity, especially aerobic weight-bearing exercise, on most days of the week, with some strength training built into your routine.
  • Preventive and Routine Healthcare in your 30s

    Follow the recommendations of your primary health care provider regarding screenings and checkups and monitor your body mass index as muscle is replaced with fat (for this purpose, you should also concentrate on building muscle during your thirties). Also be sure to take care of your back, skin, and mental health -- areas of particular concern during your thirties.
  • Special Concerns in your 30s

    Special Concerns in your 30s
    In your 30s, it is especially important to ensure that you manage stress and mental health and get enough sleep despite work, and do not try to do too much (resulting in overuse injuries). It is also important in your 30s to moisturize, cleanse, and protect skin from the sun, and to have good posture and proper lifting techniques to guard against back pain throughout life.
  • Healthy Eating in your 40s

    It is important in your 40s to continue (or begin) to have a healthy, balanced diet which does not rely too much on fast food or processed foods, though these may be easier due to a busy schedule. As weight tends to increase during your 40s due to the body's changes, it is important to eat a balanced diet to offset these changes and avoid unhealthy weight gain.
  • Physical Activity in your 40s

    You should get about 30 minutes or more of moderate physical exercise on most days of the week in order to manage stress and keep yourself limber as your body begins to slow down in your 40s.
  • Preventive and Routine Healthcare in your 40s

    Preventive and Routine Healthcare in your 40s
    The timeline for preventive and routine screenings and exams is as follows:
    A physical checkup every two to three years, a dental exam every six months to one year, a comprehensive eye exam every two years, blood pressure screening every two years (unless you are at an increased risk), cholesterol screening every five years, immunizations as needed, screenings for men's/women's health as needed, and various other exams based on your level of risk for the condition or disease.
  • Special Concerns in your 40s

    Special Concerns in your 40s
    Make sure to find out your family health history now if you have not done so previously so that you will know what conditions you are at an increased risk for. Certain health problems such as diabetes, back pain, heart health (blood pressure, etc.), and chronic pain often develop during your forties, so it is important to talk to a doctor and get all the necessary screenings for these.Additionally, it may be necessary to check on sexual health, vision and hearing, and your skin as they change.
  • Healthy Eating in your 50s

    Healthy Eating in your 50s
    Be sure that your diet consists of good nutrition and does not contain unnecessary sodium or unhealthy fat. Do be sure that your diet includes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, healthy fats, and lean meats, as well as sufficient fiber and minerals. This is crucial in maintaining a healthy weight throughout your 50s.
  • Physical Activity in your 50s

    In your fifties it is recommended that you get half an hour to an hour of physical activity most days of the week, including weight-bearing and aerobic exercises to reduce your risk of chronic heart disease and osteoporosis as they may tend to develop in your fifties.
  • Preventive healthcare/ Special Concerns in your 50s

    Preventive healthcare/ Special Concerns in your 50s
    It is good to continue routine screenings as recommended by your doctor and as begun in your forties, though you are now at an increased risk for numerous chronic conditions and diseases, including abnormal blood sugar levels, osteoporosis, cancer, heart disease, chronic pain, changes in vision and hearing, high blood pressure or cholesterol, sexual changes such as menopause, and other such conditions. It is important to be screened for these and tell your doctor if anything occurs.
  • Healthy Eating in your 60s

    Healthy Eating in your 60s
    It is important in your sixties to limit processed foods and eat a wide variety of nutritious foods, including 4-5 servings of fruits and vegetables, 2-3 servings of low- or notfat dairy products, 3 servings of whole grains or other fibers, and 46-56 grams of protein.
  • Physical Activity in your 60s

    Get at least 30 minutes of exercise most days of the week, but check with your doctor before beginning an exercise regimen to ensure you are getting the right type and amount of exercise for your body.
  • Preventive Healthcare and Special Concerns in your 60s

    Preventive Healthcare and Special Concerns in your 60s
    It is important in your 60s to see your health care provider on a regular basis and to recognize the warning signs of severe health problems such as heart attacks and strokes. Get regular screenings for a variety of conditions, and be sure to take care of your heart health, as heart disease is the #1 cause of death for men and women. Additionally, pay attention to your cognitive function, as this may begin to decline in your 60s, and try to reduce your risk of falls.
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    20s

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    30s

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    40s

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    60s