History of technology

Timeline created by musictechnology
In Music
  • The first telegraph line

    The first telegraph line
    western union sent the first transcontinental telegram to President Abraham Lincoln, predicting that the new communication link would help ensure the loyalty of the western states to the Union during the Civil War
  • The First Typewriter

    The First Typewriter
    The keys of Sholes' typewriter had been arranged in alphabetical order, but the mechanical bars which struck the paper consistently jammed, so he rearranged his keyboard, putting the letter-bars that had jammed most frequently farther apart.
  • The Remington Arms company signs a deal to market Sholes' Typewriter under their name

    The Remington Arms company signs a deal to market Sholes' Typewriter under their name
    Christopher Sholes is known as the father of the typewriter. As a young man, Sholes served a four-year printing apprenticeship before moving with his parentsto Wisconsin.
  • Alexander Graham Bell

    Alexander Graham Bell
    On this day in 1876, 29-year-old Alexander Graham Bell receives a patent for his revolutionary new invention--the telephone
  • The phonograph

    The phonograph
    Edison immediately tested the machine by speaking the nursery rhyme into the mouthpiece, "Mary had a little lamb." To his amazement, the machine played his words back to him
  • Emile Berliner invents the first microphone

     Emile Berliner invents the first microphone
    Emile Berliner invented the first microphone used as a telephone voice transmitter
  • Edison issued a patent for the electric incandescent light bulb

    Edison issued a patent for the electric incandescent light bulb
    was an American inventor, scientist, and businessman who developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and a long-lasting, practical electric light bulb
  • The First Jukebox

    The First Jukebox
    This was the first Nickel-in-the-Slot. In its first six months of service, the Nickel-in-the-Slot earned over $1000.
  • Valdemar Poulson invents magnetic wire sound recording

    Valdemar Poulson invents magnetic wire sound recording
    Vlademar Poulsen invented the Telegraphone, the first wire recorder, with "strung-out piano wire and a primitive electromagnet connected to a microphone".
  • Tin Pan Alley

    Tin Pan Alley
    "Tin Pan Alley" was the nickname given to the street where many music publishers worked during the period of 1880 to 1953
  • After the ball

    After the ball
    After the ballThe story behind the song is that Harris watched two young lovers at a dance in Chicago quarrel and leave separately, which prompted him to make a note "Many a heart is aching, after the ball." Later, although using that same line, he altered the story to that of an old man relating the tragic tale of a lost love to his young niece.-
  • Shellac gramophone disks developed by Emile Berliner

    Shellac gramophone disks developed by Emile Berliner
    A gramophone record is an analogue sound recording medium consisting of a flat disc with an inscribed modulated spiral groove.
  • The electric theater

    The electric theater
    April 16 - "The Electric Theater" in Los Angeles is opened by Thomas L.- Tally’s Electric Theatre is listed as the first permanent movie theater designed specifically for the exhibition of films.
  • Double-sided phonograph

    Double-sided phonograph
    Columbia Records introduced the first double-sided phonograph records. Finally in 1912, cylinder recordings were a thing of the past and disc recordings were the hip thing to have.
  • Mary Pickford

    Mary Pickford
    Known as "America's Sweetheart," "Little Mary" and "The girl with the curls," she was one of the first Canadian pioneers in early Hollywood and one of film's greatest pioneers
  • Disk recordings overtake cylinders in the popular market

    Disk recordings overtake cylinders in the popular market
    the patents for the manufacture of lateral-cut disc records expired, opening the field for countless companies to produce them, causing disc records to overtake cylinders in popularity
  • The Squaw Man

    The Squaw Man
    It had begun as a successful stage play in 1905 (featuring future cowboy star William S. Hart), and had been revived in 1907, 1908 and 1911. At a price of $5,000, the filmmakers recruited the star of the 1911 run, Dustin Farnum.-
  • First Transcontinental Call

    First Transcontinental Call
    96 years ago, Alexander Graham Bell placed the first transcontinental phone call, ringing up Thomas A. Watson in San Francisco from New York.
  • The Orig. Dixieland Jass

    The Orig. Dixieland Jass
    The Dixieland Jazz Bandover 80 years after their initial release. However unfair and indicative of the racism of the era, the record "Livery Stable Blues", coupled with "Dixie Jass Band One Step" became the first Jazz record ever released on February 26, 1917 for the Victor Talking Machine Company.
  • Record Changer

    Record Changer
    It was a push-type changer with a stepped center spindle and a pusher platform at the rim of the record. The platform was turned to set it for 10" or 12" records.
  • Teletypewriters

    Teletypewriters
    An electromechanical typewriter that either transmits or receives messages coded in electrical signals carried by telegraph or telephone wires
  • Electric Records replace audio disks

    Electric Records replace audio disks
    Between 1917 and 1924, they made an estimated 450 acoustic recordings
  • Vitaphone introduces a sound system

    Vitaphone introduces a sound system
    the speed and size of these
    discs (16-inches running at approximately 33rpm)
  • John Logie Baird invents mechanical television

    John Logie Baird invents mechanical television
    Baird's 30 line images were the first demonstrations of television by reflected light rather than back-lit silhouettes.
  • "Televisor",

    "Televisor",
    A broadcast television system that used mechanical or electromechanical devices to capture and display video images. However, the images themselves were usually transmitted electronically and via radio waves.postcard-sized black and pink (not black and white) image with 30 scan lines running
    at a flickering 12 1/2 frames per second.
  • Philo Farnsworth transmits the first "electric television" picture

    Philo Farnsworth transmits the first "electric television" picture
  • "Columbia Broadcasting System" begins radio broadcasting

    "Columbia Broadcasting System" begins radio broadcasting
    The Columbia Phonographic Broadcasting System is officially launched on 16 stations nationwide[4]. Cigar manufacturer William S. Paley purchases the company a week later and shortens the name to Columbia Broadcasting System
  • Billboard magazine publishes its first music chart of performed songs

    Billboard magazine publishes its first music chart of performed songs
    Billboard #1 song Billboard #1 song- Country Music Artist Who Didn't Chart a Billboard No. 1 Song (1944 - 1993): Slim Whitman
  • Milton berle

    Milton berle
    Milton Berlehis popularity earned him the nicknames "Mr. Television" and "Uncle Miltie." Berle got his start in vaudeville, touring as a stand-up comic and eventually appearing with the Ziegfeld Follies. After his own show ended Berle made hundreds of guest appearances on TV, usually waving his ever-present cigar, and starred in movie comedies like It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963, playing Ethel Merman's son-in-law) and Who's Minding the Mint (1967, with Joey Bishop). He was inducted into the Televisio
  • The Edison Co. ceases the manufacturing of sound recordings.

     The Edison Co. ceases the manufacturing of sound recordings.
    Makes programs for radio on long-playing discs; first used by radio station WAAM of Newark, New Jersey, on April 4. Edison Portable Disc Phonograph with New Edison Needle Records introduced.
  • Richard M. Hollingshead opened the first Drive-In Movie Theater in Camden, NJ

    Richard M. Hollingshead opened the first Drive-In Movie Theater in Camden, NJ
    Originally, a movie's sound was provided by speakers on the screen and later by an individual speaker hung from the window of each car, which would be attached by a wire. The screen can be as simple as a wall that is painted white, or it can be a steel truss structure with a complex finish.
  • Western Union introduces the first "singing telegram" service

    Western Union introduces the first "singing telegram" service
    singing telegram is a message, transmitted by telegram or otherwise, that is delivered by an artist in a musical form
  • The first "3-strip Technicolor" feature-length motion picture

    The first "3-strip Technicolor" feature-length motion picture
    'Becky Sharp' trailer
    Technicolor became known and celebrated for its saturated levels of color, and was used most commonly for filming musicals (such as The Wizard of Oz and Singin' in the Rain), costume pictures (such as The Adventures of Robin Hood and Joan of Arc), and animated films (such as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and Fantasia),
  • "Pepsi-Cola Hits The Spot"

    "Pepsi-Cola Hits The Spot"
    Pepsi-Cola hits the spotPepsi was first introduced as "Brad's Drink" in New Bern, North Carolina, United States, in 1898 by Caleb Bradham, who made it at his home where the drink was sold. It was later labeled Pepsi Cola, named after the digestive enzyme pepsin and kola nuts used in the recipe.[2] Bradham sought to create a fountain drink that was delicious and would aid in digestion and boost energy.[3]
  • Captured German magnetic tape recorders brought to the United States

    Captured German magnetic tape recorders brought to the United States
    electrical or mechanical inscription and re-creation of sound waves, such as spoken voice, singing, instrumental music, or sound effects. The two main classes of sound recording technology are analog recording and digital recording.
  • The FCC approves the first commercial television station West of the Mississipi

    The FCC approves the first commercial television station West of the Mississipi
    KTLA was the first commercially licensed television station in the western United States, having begun operations in 1947.[
  • The FCC approves regularly-scheduled commercial television broadcasting

    The FCC approves regularly-scheduled commercial television broadcasting
    the FCC approved commercial TV broadcasting and created a licensing category for commercial stations. On the first day, New York's experimental NBC and CBS stations became commercial stations WNBT and WCBW. Eight more stations received commercial licenses later in the year.
  • Cable television in the United States

    Cable television in the United States
    Cable television in the United States in its first twenty-four years was used almost exclusively to relay over-the-air commercial broadcasting television channels to remote and inaccessible areas. It also became popular in other areas which were not remote, but whose mountainous terrain caused poor reception over the air.
  • The commercial 33 1/3 LP microgroove disc is introduced by Dr.Peter Goldmark

    The commercial 33 1/3 LP microgroove disc is introduced by Dr.Peter Goldmark
    The new product was a 12 or 10-inch fine-grooved disc made of vinyl and played with a smaller-tipped "microgroove" stylus at a speed of 33⅓ rpm. Each side of a 12-inch LP could play for over 20 minutes
  • The Audio Engineering Society is formed

    The Audio Engineering Society is formed
    AES-draws its membership from amongst engineers, scientists, other individuals with an interest or involvement in the professional audio industry. The membership largely comprises engineers developing devices or products for audio, and persons working in audio content production. It also includes acousticians, audiologists, academics, and those in other disciplines related to audio. The AES is the only world-wide professional society devoted exclusively to audio technology.
  • Bell Laboratories assembles the world's first transistor

    Bell Laboratories assembles the world's first transistor
    Bell Labs is the birthplace of the Transistor, inventing the device that led to a communications revolutionJohn Bardeen, Walter Brattain and William Shockley discovered the transistor effect and developed the first device in December 194
  • "Hank McCune Hall"

    "Hank McCune Hall"
    The sitcom cast included Larry Keating, Charles Maxwell,
    and veteran radio/TV character actor Frank Nelson
  • Zenith introduces the "Lazy Boy" -- the first television remote control

    Zenith introduces the "Lazy Boy" -- the first television remote control
    activating a motorized mechanical tuner on the TV set to which it was linked. The problem is that its link was a long cable. The convenience of being able to switch between the few channels available at the time was offset by the potential danger posed by a cord that had to be deftly avoided in dim light during commercial break food and bathroom runs.
  • CBS television broadcast the first color TV program to five cities

    CBS television broadcast the first color TV program to five cities
    It wasn't until the 1960s that the public began buying color TVs in earnest and in the 1970s the American public finally started purchasing more color TV sets than black-and-white ones. However, sales of new black-and-white TV sets lingered on even into the 1980s. This first color program was a variety show simply called, "Premiere."
  • The first episode of "I Love Lucy"

    The first episode of "I Love Lucy"
    I love lucystarring Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance, and William Frawley.The show was the first scripted television program to be shot on 35 mm film in front of a studio audience, won five Emmy Awards and received numerous nominations
  • The first pre-recorded reel-to-reel tape is offered for sale.

    The first pre-recorded reel-to-reel tape is offered for sale.
    a piece of audio equipment that records and plays back sound via a spool of magnetic tape. The full spool is loaded onto the machine (usually on the left side) and the tape is "threaded" past a recording and playback head assembly (which records or reads the magnetic patterns on the tape) and capstan/pinch roller assembly (a steel shaft that ensures constant tape motion) to an empty "take up" reel which collects the tape and winds it. The magnetic tape, usually made of extremely thin plastic (po
  • first color television sets rolled out of the RCA Victor factory

     first color television sets rolled out of the RCA Victor factory
    The model CT-100 had a 12-inch screen, and a suggested
    retail price of $1000. A total of 5,000 model CT-100 sets were made.Although it wasn't the first NTSC color TV set to ship to consumers the RCA Victor CT-100 was the first to ship in volume, with the company planning a production run of 2000 TVs.
  • The First "transistor radio" went on sale in the U.S.

    The First "transistor radio" went on sale in the U.S.
    The price was $49.99. A small portable radio receiver using transistor-based circuitry.
  • Swanson employee Gerry Thomas invents the frozen "T. V. Dinner

    Swanson employee Gerry Thomas invents the frozen "T. V. Dinner
    He also said he coined the name "TV Dinner," brainstormed the idea of having the packaging resemble a TV set, and contributed the recipe for the cornbread stuffing. Thomas later said he was uncomfortable with being called the "father" of the TV dinner, because he felt he just built upon existing ideas.
  • Sony introduces the first "solid-state" TV set

    Sony introduces the first "solid-state" TV set
    Sony introduced the first transistor TV (1959) and the first solid- state videotape recorder (1961).
  • Multitrack analog tape recording starts being used in recording studios

    Multitrack analog tape recording starts being used in recording studios
    a method of sound recording that allows for the separate recording of multiple sound sources to create a cohesive whole
  • Compact stereo tape cassettes and players are developed by Phillips

    Compact stereo tape cassettes and players are developed by Phillips
    The Compact Cassette, often referred to as audio cassette, cassette tape, cassette, or simply tape, is a magnetic tape sound recording format.
  • Douglas C. Engelbart demonstrates the first computer mouse (made of wood.)

    Douglas C. Engelbart demonstrates the first computer mouse (made of wood.)
    The first mouse was carved from wood and tracked motion via two wheels mounted on the bottom instead of the ball employed in today's models.
  • The 8-track stereo tape cartridge is developed for automobile use by Lear

    The 8-track stereo tape cartridge is developed for automobile use by Lear
    Stereo 8 was created in 1964 by a consortium led by Bill Lear of Lear Jet Corporation, along with Ampex, Ford Motor Company, General Motors, Motorola, and RCA Victor Records (RCA).
  • The "Dolby-A" professional noise reduction system is used in some recording studios

    The "Dolby-A" professional noise reduction system is used in some recording studios
    professional broadband noise reduction for recording studios.It was intended for use in professional recording studios, where it became commonplace, gaining widespread acceptance at the same time that multitrack recording became standard.
  • The "Dolby-B"

    The "Dolby-B"
    Dolby B was developed after Dolby A and presented in 1968, as a single sliding band system providing about 9 dB noise reduction (A-weighted), primarily for cassettes. It was much simpler than Dolby A and therefore much less expensive to implement in consumer products. Dolby B recordings are acceptable when played back on equipment that does not possess a Dolby B decoder, such as most inexpensive cassette players. However, Dolby B provides less effective noise reduction than Dolby A, generally by
  • The first Microprocessor

    The first Microprocessor
    In November, 1969, a company called Intel publicly introduced the world's first single chip microprocessor, the Intel 4004 invented by Intel engineers Federico Faggin, Ted Hoff, and Stanley Mazor
  • The Internet begins as a link between four university labs, called ARPANET

    The Internet begins as a link between four university labs, called ARPANET
    The Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET), was the world's first operational packet switching network and the core network of a set that came to compose the global Internet
  • Gloria Gaynor records "Never Can Say Goodbye" -- the first disco record on US radio

     Gloria Gaynor records "Never Can Say Goodbye" -- the first disco record on US radio
    Never Can Say GoodbyeGaynor was a singer with the Soul Satisfiers, a jazz/pop band, in the 1960s. Her first solo single was "She'll Be Sorry/Let Me Go Baby" (1965). Her first real success came in 1975 with the release of her album Never Can Say Goodbye, which established her as a disco artist
  • New Mexico calculator company MIPS introduces the first "micro-computer

    New Mexico calculator company MIPS introduces the first "micro-computer
    a computer with a microprocessor as its central processing unit. They are physically small compared to mainframe and minicomputers. Many microcomputers (when equipped with a keyboard and screen for input and output) are also personal computers (in the generic sense).
  • Martin Cooper of Motorola conceived the first cellular phone system

    Martin Cooper of Motorola conceived the first cellular phone system
    It was the incarnation of his vision for personal wireless communications, distinct from cellular car phones. That first call, placed to Cooper's rival at AT&T's Bell Labs from the streets of New York City, caused a fundamental technology and communications market shift toward the person and away from the place.
  • The first all solid-state video cameras are introduced using Bell Labs

    The first all solid-state video cameras are introduced using Bell Labs
    Bell Laboratories demonstrated the first CCD video camera with enough resolution to use for broadcast television. The CCD technology first developed by Bell Labs is found in all kinds of digital imaging devices today, including High-Definition television and video cameras. Other common technology that use CCD imagers are: web cameras, medical scopes, fax machines, copy machines, image scanners, digital cameras and bar code readers.
  • Garrett Brown invents the gyroscopic Steadicam

    Garrett Brown invents the gyroscopic Steadicam
    The Steadicam was first used in the Hal Ashby film, Bound for Glory (1976), receiving an Academy Award (Best Cinematography) and since on such films as Rocky, filming Rocky's running and training sequences, and Return of the Jedi where Garrett walked with the Steadicam shooting film at 1 frame per second to achieve the illusion of high speed motion during the speeder bike chase. first used in the movie "Rocky."
  • The Sugarhill Gang's "Rapper's Delight", is the first hip-hop record to reach Top 40 radio

    The Sugarhill Gang's "Rapper's Delight", is the first hip-hop record to reach Top 40 radio
    Sugarhill GangWhile it was not the first single to feature rapping, it is generally considered to be the song that first popularized hip hop in the United States and around the world. The song's opening lyric "I said a hip hop, a hippie, a hippie to the hip hop" is world-renowned. The song is ranked #248 on the Rolling Stone magazine's list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, #2 on About.com's 100 Greatest Hip-Hop Songs, and #2 on VH1's 100 Greatest Hip-Hop Songs. The 15-minute song was recorded in a singl
  • The MTV Music TV Cable Network debuts on the air at Midnight

    The MTV Music TV Cable Network debuts on the air at Midnight
    MTV, formerly an initialism of Music Television, is an American network based in New York City that launched on August 1, 1981.[1] The original purpose of the channel was to play music videos guided by on-air hosts known as VJs.[2]
  • The digital Compact Disc (CD) is introduced by a Japanese conglomerate.

    The digital Compact Disc (CD) is introduced by a Japanese conglomerate.
    It was originally developed to store and playback sound recordings exclusively, but later expanded to encompass data storage (CD-ROM)
  • The first CD released (in Japan) is Billy Joel's "52nd Street" (October, 1982.)

    The first CD released (in Japan) is Billy Joel's "52nd Street" (October, 1982.)
    52nd Street is the sixth studio album by Billy Joel, released in 1978. It was also the first of many Joel albums to top the Billboard charts, along with his third and fourth Grammy win.52nd Street also became, in 1982, the first commercial album to be released on compact disc (by Sony Music Entertainment).
  • Fred Cohen created the very first computer virus

     Fred Cohen created the very first computer virus
    In 1983, while a student at the University of Southern California's School of Engineering (currently the Viterbi School of Engineering), he wrote a program for a parasitic application that seized control of computer operations, one of the first computer viruses, in Leonard Adleman’s class.
  • NBC broadcasts the first television programs with stereo sound.

    NBC broadcasts the first television programs with stereo sound.
    Multichannel television sound, better known as MTS (often still as BTSC, for the Broadcast Television Systems Committee that created it), is the method of encoding three additional channels of audio into an NTSC-format audio carrier
  • The (128K) Apple Macintosh personal computer debuts with a Graphical User Interface

    The (128K) Apple Macintosh personal computer debuts with a Graphical User Interface
    "the computer for the rest of us", expected sales of 50,000 the first month at $2495, the industry (and Apple) is surprised when 75,000 orders pour in...perhaps due in part to a novel TV ad aired during the Football Superbowl game.
  • Tim Berners-Lee

    Tim Berners-Lee
    finishes programming the first practical Web Browser, which comes to be known as "Nexus", incorporating both FTP (file transfer protocol) and his own HTTP (HyperText Transfer Protocol), simplifying interactions between client and server machines, making a more seamless display of text and graphics over the Internet
  • Personal computers outsell TV sets for the first time in the United States

    Personal computers outsell TV sets for the first time in the United States
    According to the EIA's annual survey, released at the Consumer Electronics Show here, there were $8.1 billion in personal computer sales in 1994, compared with $7.3 billion in sales of color TVs.The trade group's figures were part of its review of the overall consumer electronics market for 1994, which saw sales rise 9.2 percent to $56 billion with PCs, TVs and mobile electronics leading the increase.
  • The Internet starts to "take off" as a major computing platform due to the World Wide

    The Internet starts to "take off" as a major computing platform due to the World Wide
    The Internet is just a world passing around notes in a classroom.Web being "discovered" for a myriad of commercial and social uses
  • The DVD (Digital Versatile Disc) increases capacity of digital storage of audio and videoon CDs

    The DVD (Digital Versatile Disc) increases capacity of digital storage of audio and videoon CDs
    DVD is an optical disc storage media format, invented and developed by Philips, Sony, Toshiba, and Panasonic in 1995. DVDs offer higher storage capacity than Compact Discs while having the same dimensions. medium; can store on to 4.7 GigaBytes per side; double-sided disks are possible though rare...
  • The world falls in love with everything Internet,

    The world falls in love with everything Internet,
    Everybody in the world love the computers becase they are a lot faster than reading a book and they are fun to use.
  • First regular transmissions of HDTV

    First regular transmissions of HDTV
    High-definition television (or HDTV) is video that has resolution substantially higher than that of traditional television systems (standard-definition TV, or SDTV, or SD). HDTV has one or two million pixels per frame, roughly five times that of SD. Early HDTV broadcasting used analog techniques, but today HDTV is digitally broadcast using video compression
  • Recordable CD-R digital audio disc technology becomes part of personal computer systems

    Recordable CD-R digital audio disc technology becomes part of personal computer systems
    people love how they can record there favorite songs and other things on a cd and get to listen to it wherever they go.
  • "Internet Bubble"

    "Internet Bubble"
    was a speculative bubble covering roughly 1995–2000 (with a climax on March 10, 2000 with the NASDAQ peaking at 5132.52 in intraday trading before closing at 5048.62) during which stock markets in industrialized nations saw their equity value rise rapidly from growth in the more recent Internet sector and related fields
  • E-Books

    E-Books
    a book-length publication in digital form, consisting of text, images, or both, and produced on, published through, and readable on computers or other electronic devices
  • Consumer DVD recorders were introduced at the Comdex Consumer Electronics show

    Consumer DVD recorders were introduced at the Comdex Consumer Electronics show
    The International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is a major technology-related trade show held each January in the Las Vegas Convention Center, Las Vegas, Nevada. Not open to the public, the Consumer Electronics Association-sponsored show typically hosts previews of products and new product announcements.
  • DVD video disk players outsell VHS video cassette recorder/players for the first time

    DVD video disk players outsell VHS video cassette recorder/players for the first time
    people want the new improved thing and that thing is the DVD and the VHS are out of the picture.
  • Music DVD's are introduced which can contain 7 - 10 times the amount of music

    Music DVD's are introduced which can contain 7 - 10 times the amount of music
    Standard CDs have a diameter of 120 millimetres (4.7 in) and can hold up to 80 minutes of uncompressed audio or 700 MB (700 × 220 bytes) of data. The Mini CD has various diameters ranging from 60 to 80 millimetres (2.4 to 3.1 in); they are sometimes used for CD singles, storing up to 24 minutes of audio or delivering device drivers.
  • Apple Computer introduces the iPod portable music player

    Apple Computer introduces the iPod portable music player
    The company's best-known hardware products include the Macintosh line of computers, the iPod, the iPhone and the iPad.A portable media player (PMP) or digital audio player, (DAP) is a consumer electronics device that is capable of storing and playing digital media such as audio, images, video, documents, etc. the data is typically stored on a hard drive, microdrive, or flash memory.
  • Apple Computer introduces a downloadable music service via its iTunes music application

     Apple Computer introduces a downloadable music service via its iTunes music application
    iTunes is a media player computer program, used for playing and organizing digital music and video files on desktop computers. It can also manage contents on iPod, iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. iTunes can connect to the iTunes Store to purchase and download music, music videos, television shows, iPod games, audiobooks, podcasts, movies and movie rentals (not available in all countries), and ringtones (only available on iPhone and iPod Touch 4th Generation). It is also used to download applicati
  • Retailers Wal-Mart, Target, Best Buy and Circuit City announce they will stop selling VHS Video Cassette tapes

    Retailers Wal-Mart, Target, Best Buy and Circuit City announce they will stop selling VHS Video Cassette tapes
    These places had to stop selling VHS because DVDs are the big thing and no one wants the old stuff they want what is going to be in the future.
  • Western Union stopped delivering telegrams as of this date

    Western Union stopped delivering telegrams as of this date
    After 145 years, Western Union has quietly stopped sending telegrams.The world's first telegram was sent on May 24, 1844 by inventor Samuel Morse. The message, "What hath God wrought," was transmitted from Washington to Baltimore.
  • Apple Computer's online music store integrated

    Apple Computer's online music store integrated
    Apple® today launched the iTunes® Music Store, a revolutionary online music store that lets customers quickly find, purchase and download the music they want for just 99 cents per song, without subscription fees.