The Evolution of the Television

Timeline created by JosDan105
  • The Octagon Television

    The Octagon Television
    This was the first mechanical television made by General Electric to be demonstrated in public. The TV was powered by rapidly spinning wheels. They made the TV as an experiment and was meant to air the first TV drama, The Queen's messenger. It had a 3-inch screen.
  • Baird

    Baird
    World's First TV Broadcast
    Made in England, it was the first cathode ray tube television receiver to be sold to the public. Being around 3ft wide and 2ft high, the set used a 30-line scanning disk, and it transmitted the first wireless moving images. It played the world's first live TV broadcast, which was the play, "The Man with a Flower in his mouth."
    (Play video from 5:55)
  • Emyvisor (French TV)

    Emyvisor (French TV)
    This television increases the image by adding a magnifying lens to make it 8 inches, and it plays at 25 frames per second. But this television featured a "vision only" station, which meant a seperate radio had to be purchased. Only ten of these sets were made.
  • Marconi

    Marconi
    Video Sample
    Being about 2ft long, and 1 1/2 ft tall and wide, this televeision had a 7-inch screen and weighed at more than 100lbs., but that was considered as compact back in the day.
    (Play video from 0:25-0:48)
  • RCA 630TS

    RCA 630TS
  • Motorola "Golden View"

    Motorola "Golden View"
    This TV was considered the best and most affordable at the time. It came in portable and tabletop cabinets with a 7-inch screen, a cheaper rotary switch that could select up to 8 stations, and a 6 1/2in. permanent magnet speaker. It only weighed about 26lbs.
  • Raytheon

    Raytheon
    This TV came in a new round shape, known as the "porthole" and came with 12 channels.
  • First Remote is Made

    First Remote is Made
  • Sharp

    Sharp
    First Japan-made television that was in mass production. A total of 14 inches with a wood frame it wide screen made it well known. One of the expensive televisions in Japan and not the common household television.
  • The First Color TV Set

    The First Color TV Set
    CT-100: RCA makes an expensive TV set available for consumers. Color TV had been anticipated for years, and this model was priced for $7850 in today's money. With a 15-inch screen, it also had backwards-compatibility with black-and-white broadcasts.
  • Philco Predicta

    Philco Predicta
    This TV's style is well known for its 1950s retro/futuristic design. It can have a 17- or 21-inch screen that can swivel on its tube. One of its best features was its wide screen.
  • Meidensha

    Meidensha
    Developed by the Japanese, this is another well-known TV model that could come in 10- to 21-inch screens, but only a couple were available in color.
  • Philco-Ford

    Philco-Ford
    This was one of the last vacuum-tube TV sets.
  • HDTV

    HDTV
    The Japanese developed the first HDTVs, but weren't common until later on.
  • Sony FD Trinitron WEGA

    Sony FD Trinitron WEGA
    This flat-screen television is the first to have a built-in VCR and DVD player. It had many more channels and he screen size was largely increased and improved.
  • Flat-Panel TV's

    Flat-Panel TV's
    Flat-Panel TV's became more popular as they got more affordable. Samsung was the leading seller. The televisions were flat and had high resolution; one of the first of its kind with plasma.
  • Smart TV's

    Smart TV's
    Samsung introduces Smart TV's, which can connect to the internet, have multiple apps, and have 3D features.
  • Curved TV's

    Curved TV's
    TV Commercial
    Introduced by Samsung and LG. The curved screen is supposed the give the perfect viewing angle at any spot. It's over a hundred times faster than LED TVs, and has incredibly consistent contrast and doesn't distort colors. It also includes a new smart remote with gesture and voice control. Basically, the curved TV is supposed to be better in every way.
  • Period: to

    RCA

    The Radio Corporation of America introduced and explained television to the American public at a 1939 World Fair. Their RCA 630TS was a hit in 1946 right after World War II. It had a 10-inch screen and weighed about 85lbs. The inventor was Philo Farnsworth.