East asian studies

Dynasties and Periods of East Asia

  • 2200 BCE

    Xia Dynasty Begins China

    Xia Dynasty Begins China
    This dynasty was located in China. They were the first to irrigate, build a strong army, and produce cast bronze.
  • 1766 BCE

    Shang Dynasty Begins {China}

    Shang Dynasty Begins {China}
    This dynasty was mostly known for their advances in bronze and ceramics. They also introduced writing systems to China
  • 1700 BCE

    Xia Dynasty Ends

    Xia Dynasty Ends
    Dynasty ends from a killing
  • 1080 BCE

    Shang Dynasty Ends {China}

    Shang Dynasty Ends {China}
    The Shang Dynasty was invaded and overthrown.
  • 1045 BCE

    Zhou Dynasty Begins {China}

    Zhou Dynasty Begins {China}
    This was one of China's long lasting dynasties. Some of their achievement were characteristics include bronze work, military technology, including horse-drawn chariots, writing, a calendar, and religion, which featured ancestor worship and oracle bones
  • 221 BCE

    Zhou Dynasty Ends {China}

    Zhou Dynasty Ends {China}
    This dynasty ended when the army of the state of Qin captured the city of Chengzhou and the last Zhou ruler, King Nan, was killed.
  • 221 BCE

    Qin Dynasty Begins {China}

    Qin Dynasty Begins {China}
    During it's time it unified China and succeeded in building the Great Wall of China
  • 206 BCE

    Qin Dynasty Ends {China}

    Qin Dynasty Ends {China}
    This dynasty ended when China plunged into civil war, exacerbated by floods and droughts. In 207 BCE, Qin Shi Huang's son was killed, and the dynasty collapsed entirely.
  • 206 BCE

    Han Dynasty Begins {China}

    Han Dynasty Begins {China}
    The Han Dynasty lasted about 400 years. Much of Chinese culture was established during the Han dynasty and it is sometimes called the Golden Age of Ancient China. It was an era of peace and prosperity and allowed China to expand to a major world power.
  • 57 BCE

    Silla Dynasty Begins {Korea}

    Silla Dynasty Begins {Korea}
    Three Kingdoms period from the 1st century BCE to 7th century CE. The Silla were in constant rivalry with their neighbours the Baekje
  • 37 BCE

    Goguryeo Dynasty Begins {Korea}

    Goguryeo Dynasty Begins {Korea}
    At its peak of power, Goguryeo controlled most of the Korean peninsula, large parts of Manchuria and parts of the Russian Far East and eastern Mongolia. Along with Baekje and Silla, Goguryeo was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.
  • 18 BCE

    Baekje Dynasty Begins {Korea}

    Baekje Dynasty Begins {Korea}
    Was one of the Three Kingdoms which ruled over ancient Korea from the 1st century BCE to the 7th century CE. The Baekje kingdom was noted for its high culture, many aspects of which it exported to its ally Japan.
  • 221

    Han Dynasty Ends {China}

    Han Dynasty Ends {China}
    The Han dynasty formally ended in 220 when Cao Cao's son and heir, Cao Pi, pressured Emperor Xian into abdicating in his favour.
  • 581

    Sui Dynasty Begins {China}

    Sui Dynasty Begins {China}
    Sui dynasty also had a stable economy, which was militaristic, and they were legalists. The Sui made the Grand Canal, which was one of their biggest accomplishments. They had slaves dig a canal so they could trade easier, and get around better and more efficiently.
  • 618

    Sui Dynasty Ends {China}

    Sui Dynasty Ends {China}
    Due to the many losses caused by the failed military campaigns against Goguryeo. It was after these defeats and losses that the country was left in ruins and rebels soon took control of the government. Emperor Yang was assassinated in 618.
  • 618

    Tang Dynasty Begins {China}

    Tang Dynasty Begins {China}
    Experienced a time of peace and prosperity that made it one of the most powerful nations in the world. This time period is sometimes referred to as the Golden Age of Ancient China.
  • 660

    Baekje Dynasty Ends {Korea}

    Baekje Dynasty Ends {Korea}
    In 660 its defeat by the allied forces of Silla and the Chinese T'ang dynasty (618–907) brought an end to its rule.
  • 668

    Goguryeo Dynasty Ends {Korea}

    Goguryeo Dynasty Ends {Korea}
    In 661 CE a Tang army besieged Pyongyang which was weakened by an internal power struggle for the throne. The Tangs were forced to withdraw, but when they attacked again in 667 CE, the city, although this time holding out for a year, finally fell.
  • 698

    Balhae Dynasty Begins {Korea}

    Balhae Dynasty Begins {Korea}
    Important regional power which interacted both peacefully and otherwise with its neighbours the Unified Silla Kingdom of Korea and Tang China. The latter was a strong cultural influence, and Japan, too, was a staunch ally.
  • 710

    Nara and Heian Period Begins{Japan}

    Nara and Heian Period Begins{Japan}
    During the Nara Period the government officially supported Buddhism and a succession of large temples were built at important parts of the capital to protect the emperor and
  • 907

    Tang Dynasty Ends {China}

    Tang Dynasty Ends {China}
    the Tang dynasty was ended when Zhu Wen, now a military governor, deposed the last emperor of Tang, Emperor Ai of Tang, and took the throne for himself. ... Zhu Wen was known posthumously as Emperor Taizu of Later Liang.
  • 918

    Goryeo Dynasty Begins {Korea}

    Goryeo Dynasty Begins {Korea}
    Confucianism became the official philosophy of the dynasty. To meet the standards demanded by their patrons, Goryeo artisans created exquisite celadons, elegant Buddhist paintings, and superb inlaid metal crafts as well as inlaid lacquer ware.
  • 926

    Balhae Dynasty Ends {Korea}

    Balhae Dynasty Ends {Korea}
    After the fall of Balhae and its last king in 926, the autonomous satellite state of Dongdan was founded by its new Khitan rulers Goryeo once proposed a joint-invasion of the Khitan empire to China in retribution of Balhae's fall.
  • 935

    Silla Dynasty Ends {Korea}

    Silla Dynasty Ends {Korea}
    The last Silla king, Gyeongsun, surrendered in 935 CE and left Wang Kon to unify the country once again but under a new name, the Goryeo Dynasty, which would rule Korea from 918 CE to 1392 CE. This content was made possible with generous support from the British Korean Society.
  • 960

    Song Dynasty Begins {China}

    Song Dynasty Begins {China}
    With a prosperous economy and radiant culture, this period was considered as another period of 'golden age' after the glorious Tang Dynasty (618 - 907).
  • 1192

    Nara and Heian Period Ends {Japan}

    Nara and Heian Period Ends {Japan}
    The era came to an end when the Emperor Kanmu decided to move the capital shortly after the death of the Empress Kōken, in an attempt to remove the court from the intrigues and power plays of the Buddhist establishment at Nara.
  • 1192

    Kamakura Period Begins {Japan}

    Kamakura Period Begins {Japan}
    In Japanese history, the period from 1192 to 1333 during which the basis of feudalism was firmly established. It was named for the city where Minamoto Yoritomo set up the headquarters of his military government, commonly known as the Kamakura shogunate.
  • 1279

    Song Dynasty Ends {China}

    Song Dynasty Ends {China}
    Jin army captured the Northern Song capital of Kaifeng , ending the Northern Song Dynasty. B. After the Southern Song Dynasty joined the Mongolian Kingdom to overthrow the Jin Dynasty they found themselves in turmoil with them
  • 1279

    Mongol Dynasty Begins {China}

    Mongol Dynasty Begins {China}
    Mongols were a nomadic people from the steppes of Central Asia. Known as fierce horsemen and warriors, the Mongol clans were united in 1279 by the powerful chief Temujin, later known as Genghis Khan. ... However, Genghis Khan was not only a skilled conqueror, but also a great ruler.
  • 1333

    Kamakura Period Ends {Japan}

    Kamakura Period Ends {Japan}
    It ended in 1221 when Kamakura defeated the Imperial army in Kyoto giving them control over all of Japan. The emperor and the court in Kyoto lost almost all effective power at this time.
  • 1338

    Muromachi Period Begins {Japan}

    Muromachi Period Begins {Japan}
    Muromachi period, also called Ashikaga Period, in Japanese history, period of the Ashikaga Shogunate. It was named for a district in Kyōto, where the first Ashikaga shogun, Takauji, established his administrative headquarters.
  • 1368

    Mongol Dynasty Ends {China}

    Mongol Dynasty Ends {China}
    Kublai Khan, the Mongols disintegrate into competing entities and lose influence, in part due to the outbreak of the Black Death. In 1368, the Ming Dynasty overthrows the Yuan, the Mongols' ruling power, thus signifying the end of the empire.
  • 1368

    Mongol Dynasty Ends {China}

    Mongol Dynasty Ends {China}
    Kublai Khan, the Mongols disintegrate into competing entities and lose influence, in part due to the outbreak of the Black Death. In 1368, the Ming Dynasty overthrows the Yuan, the Mongols' ruling power, thus signifying the end of the empire.
  • 1368

    Ming Dynasty Begins {China}

    Ming Dynasty Begins {China}
    Known for its trade expansion to the outside world that established cultural ties with the West, the Ming Dynasty is also remembered for its drama, literature and world-renowned porcelain.
  • 1392

    Goryeo Dynasty End {Korea}

    Goryeo Dynasty End {Korea}
    Goryeo fell to General Yi Seong-gye, a son of Yi Ja-chun, who put to death the last three Goryeo kings, usurped the throne and established in 1392 the Joseon dynasty.
  • 1392

    Joseon Dynasty Begins {Korea}

    Joseon Dynasty Begins {Korea}
    Joseon was the last dynasty of Korea and its longest-ruling Confucian dynasty. During its reign, Joseon encouraged the entrenchment of Chinese Confucian ideals and doctrines in Korean society. After the end of invasions from Manchuria, Joseon experienced a nearly 200-year period of peace.
  • 1573

    Muromachi Period Ends {Japan}

    Muromachi Period Ends {Japan}
    The period ended with the warlord Oda Nobunaga seizing power in 1568 CE and his decision to exile the last Ashikaga shogun in 1573 CE
  • 1573

    Azuchi-Momoyama Period Begins {Japan}

    Azuchi-Momoyama Period Begins {Japan}
    Azuchi-Momoyama period, also called Momoyama Period, in Japanese history, age of political unification under the daimyo Oda Nobunaga and his successor Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who finally brought all provinces under the control of the central government.
  • Azuchi-Momoyama Period Ends {Japan}

    Azuchi-Momoyama Period Ends {Japan}
    Thereafter, Ishida Mitsunari accused Ieyasu of disloyalty to the Toyotomi name, precipitating a crisis that led to the Battle of Sekigahara.
  • Edo Period Begins {Japan}

    Edo Period Begins {Japan}
    Economic development during the Edo period included urbanization, increased shipping of commodities, a significant expansion of domestic and, initially, foreign commerce, and a diffusion of trade and handicraft industries. The construction trades flourished, along with banking facilities and merchant associations.
  • Ming Dynasty Ends {China}

    Ming Dynasty Ends {China}
    Beijing fell to a rebel army led by Li Zicheng, a former minor Ming official who became the leader of the peasant revolt and then proclaimed the Shun dynasty. The last Ming emperor, the Chongzhen Emperor, hanged himself on a tree in the imperial garden outside the Forbidden City.
  • Qing Dynasty Begins {China}

    Qing Dynasty Begins {China}
    It was an era noted for its initial prosperity and tumultuous final years, and for being only the second time that China was not ruled by the Han people
  • Edo Period Ends {Japan}

    Edo Period Ends {Japan}
    In January 1868, they attempted a coup d'etat to overthrow the newly throned Shogun Tokugawa Keiki. After a short period of fighting, Emperor Meiji took supreme control of the country. During his reign from 1867 to 1912, Japan was completely transformed and it became a world power.
  • Meiji Period Begins {Japan}

    Meiji Period Begins {Japan}
    The Meiji period that followed the Restoration was an era of major political, economic, and social change in Japan. The reforms enacted during the Meiji emperor's rule brought about the modernization and Westernization of the country and paved the way for Japan to become a major international power.
  • Joseon Dynasty Ends {Korea}

    Joseon Dynasty Ends {Korea}
    In 1910, the Joseon Dynasty fell, and Japan formally occupied the Korean Peninsula. According to the "Japan-Korea Annexation Treaty of 1910," the Emperor of Korea ceded all his authority to the Emperor of Japan.
  • Qing Dynasty Ends {China}

    Qing Dynasty Ends {China}
    After more than 2,000 years, though, Chinese imperial power under the last Chinese dynasty was about to collapse for good.
  • Meiji Period Ends {Japan}

    Meiji Period Ends {Japan}
    The emperor Meiji was moved from Kyoto to Tokyo which became the new capital; his imperial power was restored. ... The boundaries between the social classes of Tokugawa Japan were gradually broken down.
  • Taisho and Early Showa Period Begins {Japan}

    Taisho and Early Showa Period Begins {Japan}
    Is often considered a brief flowering of democracy in Japan before the country slid into militarism, ultra-nationalism and totalitarianism in the early Showa Period.
  • Taisho and Early Showa Period Ends {Japan}

    Taisho and Early Showa Period Ends {Japan}
    That was the time when Emperor Hirohito, son of Emperor Taisho, held power. During this period, Japan changed significantly. The early years were marked by financial crisis and the rise of nationalism, which ended with Japan's defeat in World War II.