Casey Canon's Timeline Final Project

  • Conceived

    I was conceived in September of 1987, where my prenatal journey began.
  • Period: to

    Timeline

  • Prenatal - Germinal Period

    Before I was an embryo or fetus, my life was created by rapid cell divison and cell differentiation. This is called the Germinal Period.
  • Prenatal - Embryonic Period

    My organs such as skin, heart and eyes started to develop as I became an embryo.
  • Prenatal - Fetus

    As my embryo developed into a fetus, which finally began to look human-like, my heartbeat became stronger and my digestive and excretory systems developed. My hair, nails, and buds for teeth formed. My central nervous system developed as my brain continued to grow and produced neurons. This process lasted up until birth.
  • Prenatal - Last 3 Months

    My lungs began to contract, excercising my muscles. I began to gain conciousness - I started hearing and recognizing my mother through my growing auditory communication skills, forming a mother/daughter bond.
  • Birth

    I was born on May 29th, 1988. I was born naturally, with no complications. I would have scored a two on the Apgar Scale, which is average, and based what a child's health should be when born. I had a strong heart beat, good muscle use, and I was crying/reacting to my surroundings.
  • The First Two Years; Biosocial

    My brain began developing immediatly from my new human experiences. This is done through the pruning of neurons.
  • The First Two Years; Biosocial

    I began paying attention to my hands, and what I could grab at about 9 months. I also began crawling at 10 months. This is when fine and gross motor skills are developed in infants.
  • The First Two Years; Cognitive

    Throughout the end of the first year of infancy, children begin cooing and making various noises as they discover their own voices. At about 13 months my perception and language skills grew enough that I was able to speak my first word.
  • The First Two Years; Biosocial

    I began walking at around 14 months, a huge milestone in gross motor skill development.
  • The First Two Years; Psychosocial

    My mom, who recently quit her nursing job to be a full time mother, spent all of her days interacting with me and caring for me. In those years, emotional connections were made, and I was able to learn through social referencing.
  • Early Childhood; Biosocial

    Learning, with the help of my mother, led to my brain maturity. Emotional expression and control were learned through my limbic system maturing. All of this prepared me for preschool, where I would encounter other children that would help me learn even more.
  • Early Childhood; Cognitive

    I began preschool at about three years old. This helped improve my language learning, social skills and my prospects for the future.
  • Early Childhood; Psychosocial

    When I was four years old, my little sister was born. Still being a very young child myself, I learned to interact with and "try" to care for another child. This period of time in a child's life is a very egotistical one - but my little sister was a new and exciting outlet for learning.
  • Early Childhood; Biosocial

    At around four years old, I discovered art. With my fine motor skills developed, I picked up a pencil and/or marker became obsessed with drawing and coloring, which led me to my art degree that I have now.
  • Early Childhood; Cognitive

    At five years old, I started elementary school at a Catholic private school. This was my first chance to really make friends, strengthening my moral development and helping to control my emotional regulation.
  • Early Childhood; Biosocial

    At five years old, my parents got my sister's and I our first pet for Christmas - a puppy. This showed us that our parents trusted us to 1) handle a puppy carefully and gently, and 2) care for a pet emotionally.
  • Early Childhood; Biosocial

    At six years old I experienced the pain of breaking a bone for the first time. Being reckless on a bicycle caused me to fall and break my wrist. Being six years old, I generally moved a lot quicker and with more agility than I ever had before as a toddler.
  • Middle Childhood; Psychosocial

    At nine years old, I went to my first overnight camp. It was a two-week long summer camp for children, called Camp Marrymount. Being two weeks long, and in Tennessee, I was farther away from my family than I had ever been, for the longest amount of time. I wanted to feel more mature and independent and have this experience with my friends. It was a growing experience, and helped me to not rely on my parents as much.
  • Middle Childhood; Cognitive

    At ten years old, after moving and getting settled in, I began the school year at a new school, with new people. It was nothing like I was used to. I grew up going to a pretty strict private school, and my new elementary was "public". This was both exciting and scary. It was a new experience that could perhaps teach me new learning ways.
  • Middle Childhood

    When I was 10 years old, we moved to a new town about an hour South from where we previoiusly lived. My father had decided to build his own office in a more sensable locaiton, so we left the only town I had ever known.
  • Middle Childhood; Biosocial

    At 11 years old I joined my first ever sports team. I tried out for basketball and made the team. Physical play is crucial for a child's health and happiness. Basketball helped me stay active, meet new friends and learn to be a part of a team.
  • Adolescence; Biosocial

    At 13 years old I hit puberty, when my body began rapidly growing. My hormones increased, my primary and secondary sexual characteristics (both internal and external) developed, all leading to my first menstrual cycle. This is almost a "right of passage" for young girls, where they begin their journey to maturity.
  • Adolescence; Cognitive

    When I was 14 years of age, I "graduated" from middle school, preparing for my transitions from the two secondary schools (middle school and high school). Being an 8th grader, the highest grade possible in that middle school, made me feel old and mature - until I became one of the youngest as a freshman in high school. Middle school, as well as my future highschool career, helped progress my own personal success.
  • Adolescence; Cognitive

    I started high school, now 15 years old, and for the four years I was prepared intellectually as well as socially for my future tertiary educaiton (college).
  • Adolescence; Psychosocial

    When I turned 16 I started my first job at Hungry Howies. This new job and new experience taught me to become more responsible and independent, and developed my social skills.
  • Adolescence; Psychosocial

    On my 16th birthday I got my first car, a brand new Jeep Liberty. This was the first time I had true responsibility and freedom (...to an extent). Unfortunately, in the same year, I also got in my first car accident and totaled my brand new car. I thought I was mature enough to be independent, but clearly I was still naive and immature. My parents were there to pick up the pieces, financially and emotionally. They also helped me in getting a new car.
  • Adolescence; Psychosocial

    When I was 16, I entered my very first relationship with my ex-boyfriend, Jason. This was my first experience with a boy, and our relationship lasted about 5 years - we still remain friends today. This relationship was very rocky and hard, and it taught me the basics to building a healthy future relationship (which this specific relationship wasn't). In this time, I also learned a lot about myself.
  • Adolescence; Psychosocial

    During my highschool years, being social, being independent from my family and finding my own identity was very important. At the same time, while trying to find my "own identity", the support and influence of my friends was very common and just as important at the time.
  • Adolescence; Psychosocial

    I, like majority of highschoolers, experimented with alcohol, cigarettes and marijuana. The extent of my rebellion was just adolescence-limited deliquency. Thankfully I was never addicted to drugs and was never arrested, which is more and more common in teenagers today.
  • Adolescence; Cognitive

    At 17 years old, I graduated highschool. This is the time in my teen years that I really felt invincible and I thought I knew everything. College and moving out on my own would prove to me otherwise.
  • Emerging Adulthood; Cognitive

    After living at home for two years after my highschool graduation and attending Schoolcraft Community College, I decided to transfer to Central Michigan University. I was looking for a new experience, new people and new scenery. Attending an actual university rather than a community college, in some opinions, was going to advance my critical thinking, communication and practical skills.
  • Emerging Adulthood; Psychosocial

    Moving to Mount Pleasant to attend CMU was the first time living on my own. This was one of the best decisions I ever made, for they were the happiest years of my life, and I gained so many great (and not so great) experiences that made me grow as an emerging adult. For the next three years, my parents were supportive and far too generous, helping me financially while I was living on my own.
  • Emerging Adulthood; Biosocial and Psychosocial

    At this time in my life, friends were very important. They were the people that I relied on day to day, since I was nowhere near my family. This year, one of my very close friends died from an overdose. I had experienced deaths before, but no one this close to me. This became a huge added stressor in my life.
  • Emerging Adulthood; Psychosocial

    At 23 years old, I graduated from CMU with a Bachelor of Art emphasizing in Drawing, with a minor in Art History. Even though I had a specific Bachelor's degree, I still didn't know what I wanted to do with my life, and I still had no career identity.
  • Emerging Adulthood; Psychosocial

    In the fall after graduating, I was still on the search for a career identity. I became interested in special effects makeup, and learned the trade through a professional giving personal classes. Hoping I could start a career in this business, I quickly got an assistant spfx position on an independent zombie movie. My makeup phase ended up fading, but it was a great experience and is now a fun hobby.
  • Emerging Adulthood; Biosocial/Psychosocial

    My father passed away in the fall of 2011 from Melanoma. This was very sudden and were the most straining, painful moments of my life and it continues to be a huge daily struggle. Anxiety and moments of depression are now common, and I have started getting panic attacks which I never experienced before. Thankfully, my family is extremely close and we support eachother daily. This experience made me mature drastically and gave me a better understanding of life.
  • Emerging Adulthood; Psychosocial

    My father's passing, along with 3 other cancers in my immediate family throughout the years, made me finally realize what I want to do with my life. I am now on the path to becoming an Art Therapist, and I hope to work with cancer patients. It took a long time, but I finally feel comfortable, confident and motivated in my career identity.
  • Late Adulthood; Cognitive

    At this point in life, my neurotransmitters will be less abundant, myleination will thin, and grey matter will be reduced. Yet, parts of my brain will be used that weren't used in previous years. Vocabulary and long-term memory stays strong.
  • Emerging Adulthood; Cognitive

    I will begin graduate school at Wayne State University for a Master's in Education for Art Therapy. I hope to further develop my critical thinking, communication and practical skills.
  • Emerging Adulthood; Psychosocial

    Again, with my mother's financial support, I will move out and grow more independent - but I won't be 100% independent until I can totally be on my own financially.
  • Adulthood; Cognitive

    At 27 years old, I will graduate from Graduate school. At this time I will be able to say I am an expert in an area that I wanted to specialize in due to my personal experiences.
  • Adulthood; Psychosocial

    Hopefully within the same year I can find my first job as an Art Therapist and finally start my career.
  • Adulthood; Psychosocial

    I'm hoping that before I get settled with a career and get settled in a relationship that I will find a job and a home in California. It has been one of my goals in life to move to the West Coast, and I'm detemined to do so before I get settled in life.
  • Adulthood; Psychosocial

    Around 29 years old, give or take a few years, I hope to have found someone to settle down with and marry. I don't want to have children much later than this, so I hope to be financially stable enough to have children.
  • Adulthood; Psychosocial

    At around 30-31 years old I wish to have my second (and last) child.
  • Adulthood; Psychosocial

    Around 35 years old, I hope to have moved up enough in my career to have some sort of promotion - if not at least be in a good, comfortable spot in my career.
  • Adulthood; Biosocial

    Around 50 years old, my body will have aged, and internal and external organs will show senescence (brain slows, skin wrinkles, etc.). Around this time in my life I will experience menopause, a huge drop in estrogen, and I will no longer be able to ovulate.
  • Adulthood; Psychosocial

    At 60 years old, I hope to be in a peaceful, comfortable place in my life. I hope to still be married, have grandkids, and have a wonderful and close relationship with my children the way my mom is with her daughters. I want to live near my children and grandchildren, staying involved in their lives (but not smothering!).
  • Late Adulthood; Biosocial

    At around 70 years old, my senses will fade, and primary aging (physical aging) is inevidable. Secondary aging (such as diseases easier to get with old age) come from bad health habits. Hopefully, smoking will no longer be a part of my life, and I will have made as many healthy habits as possible, helping with my secondary aging.
  • Late Adulthood; Biosocial

    I hope to still be independent and healthy during my "old-old" phase of life - not as young and agile, but not yet immobile and dependant.
  • Late Adulthood; Cognitive

    During the final decade or two of my lifespan, I will seek self-actualization and integrity. Creativity comes out more-so towards the end of life, yet will have been a big part of my life as a whole. Self-actualization shouldn't be hard to find.
  • Late Adulthood; Psychosocial

    I will (hopefully) have long since been retired, enjoying my relaxation as a retiree. I hope to still keep busy, staying socially connected. I also hope to still have my husband/significant other in my life.
  • 2068

    Around 80 years old, I obviously still wish to be as independant as possible. Eighty is still pretty young, but you never know what physical disabilities can arise, including Dementia. If the time comes that I can no longer care for myself, I hope to have family to help me, or to have assisted living.
  • Death and Dying

    Based solely on the life-expectancy calculator assignment in class, I am basing my death around the age of 81. I hope to be treated with honesty and respect at this time, whether it be from family members or caregivers. If it's a slow, painful process, I hope to have palliative care to relieve pain and uncomfortable aspects of dying. At the same time, if I have no quality of life, I do not wish to be on life support to prolong such a life.