world history

By akecha
  • Aug 25, 1096

    crusades are fought

    crusades are fought
    at least 10,000 Europeans joined the military mission to take the Holy land from the Muslims who controlled it. The first crusade lasted from 1096-1099, battle between christans and Muslems battled for the holy land. 1096 to 1291 was the year they were fought.
  • Sep 5, 1300

    the renaissance begings

    the renaissance begings
    cultural movement that started in the 1400s- the 1700s major changes began in Italy, the black death had lead to changes in the country and then later began in other countries, its was like a new era
  • Sep 11, 1337

    100 year war

    100 year war
    was many wars, france and england were against each other, fighting before and after the 100 years, mainly fought in france, many stopping periods, Joan of Arc will be introduced soon here
  • Aug 25, 1347

    black death begins in Europe

    black death begins in Europe
    one third of Europes puputlation is lost. The flagllents were the people who beat themselves, the black death came from trade ships, fleas on rats
  • Sep 23, 1368

    Ming dynasty in China

    Ming dynasty in China
    The Ming dynasty, also Empire of the Great Ming, was the ruling dynasty of China for 276 years (1368–1644) following the collapse of the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Ming, described by some as "one of the greatest eras of orderly government and social stability in human history, was the last dynasty in China ruled by ethnic Han Chinese. lasted until 1644
  • Oct 17, 1405

    Voyages of Zheng He

    Voyages of Zheng He
    Between 1405 and 1433, Zheng He had over a period of 28 years, eight times been ordered to act as envoy to countries lying to the west of China. Each time he had under his order a big fleet and a staff of more than 20,000 men. His fleets had sailed in the South China Sea and the Indian Ocean. They had gone further south to Java in today's Indonesia.
  • Sep 11, 1431

    Joan of Ark- burned at stake

    Joan of Ark- burned at stake
    part of the 100 year war ,she was only 13, and had a vision on the outcome of the war, but people looked at her funny, she was successful, later, shes 19 yrs old, and she had been burned at stake, when she had been captured
  • Sep 11, 1450

    Johannes Gutenberg- printing press

    Johannes Gutenberg- printing press
    He casts the letters of the alphabet onto metal plates and locked those plates into a wooden press. This was acutually a movable type, it had its roots in China and Korea
  • Oct 9, 1453

    Ottomans conquer Constantinople

    Ottomans conquer Constantinople
    was the capture of the capital of the Eastern Roman Byzantine Empire by an Invading army of the Ottoman Empire on Tuesday, 29 May 1453. The Ottomans were told by 21-year-old Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II, who defeated an army told by Byzantine Emperor Constantine XI Palaiologos. The rule of Constantinople followed a seven week siege that had begun on Friday, 6 April 1453.
  • Sep 19, 1492

    1st voyage of columbus

    1st voyage of columbus
    Columbus first sailed to the Canary Islands, which belonged to Castile, where he restocked the provisions and made repairs.
  • Oct 13, 1492

    Jews, gypsies and moores expelled from spain

    Jews, gypsies and moores expelled from spain
    Flamenco sprang from the lower levels of Andalucian society, and thus lacked the prestige of other art forms among the middle and higher classes. Flamenco music also slipped in and out of fashion several times during its life time. The turbulent times of the people involved in flamenco culture. The Moors, the Gitanos and the Jews were all persecuted, and the Moors (moriscos) and Jews were expelled by the Spanish Inquisition in 1492.
  • Sep 19, 1498

    Da Gama lands in India

    Da Gama lands in India
    Portuguese explorer Vasco de Gama becomes the first European to reach India via the Atlantic Ocean when he arrives at Calicut on the Malabar Coast.
    Da Gama sailed from Lisbon, Portugal, in July 1497, rounded the Cape of Good Hope, and anchored at Malindi on the east coast of Africa. With the aid of an Indian merchant he met there, he then set off across the Indian Ocean.
  • Sep 17, 1500

    Copernicus publishes heliocentric theory

    Copernicus publishes heliocentric theory
    his discovery was that the earth revolves around the sun. the sun was near in the center of the solar system
  • Sep 23, 1501

    slave trade across Atlantic

    slave trade across Atlantic
    The Atlantic slave trade or transatlantic slave trade took place across the Atlantic Ocean from the 16th through to the 19th centuries. The vast majority of those enslaved that were transported to the New World, many on the triangular trade route and its Middle Passage, were West Africans from the central and western parts of the continent sold by West Africans to Western European slave traders
  • Sep 19, 1502

    Naming the new world

    Naming the new world
    The New World is one of the names used for the Western Hemisphere, specifically the Americas, certain Atlantic and Pacific oceanic islands to which the closest continental shelf is that of the Americas.
  • Oct 17, 1502

    Safavid Empire

    Safavid Empire
    After the disastrous invasion of Mongols, in the 1200s, migrated Turks and Mongolian tribes adopted the Persian customs and even language. In the 1300s, the Ilkhanids, a dynasty founded by the Genghis Khan's grandson, Holagu Khan, had been an influential factor in Persia. During these turbulent years of 13th century, the Persians had put themselves deeper in Islamic devotion and Sufism.
  • Sep 15, 1503

    Da Vinci paints the "Mona Lisa"

    Da Vinci paints the "Mona Lisa"
    It actually was the best know portrait In the world! It was being worked on about 16 years before he died, it actually was the Lisa. It took him 3 years to do
  • Sep 3, 1508

    Michelangelo starts painting the sistine Chapel

    Michelangelo starts painting the sistine Chapel
    Michelangelos painting was not only beautiful buy also very different from the art from the middle ages, a new directon of art was only one of the ways which Europes society changed
  • Sep 25, 1509

    Henry VIII founds Anglican Church

    Henry VIII founds Anglican Church
    The churches of the Anglican Communion have their historical roots in the English Reformation, when King Henry VIII (r. 1509-1547) wished to obtain a divorce that the pope would not grant. Through the Act of Supremacy of 1534, the king made himself the "supreme head" of the Church of England in place of the Pope.
  • Sep 9, 1517

    Martin Luther posts 95 theses

    the complaints, called the 95 theses, were soon printed and distributed throught Europe. The pope, upset by the monks defiance, banned the work, telling roman catholics not to read it, the monks name is Martin Luther
  • Sep 17, 1519

    Magellan starts his around the world trip

    Magellan starts his around the world trip
    sailed from atlantic ocean, and had his 5 ships
  • Oct 15, 1526

    Mughal empire begins

    Mughal empire begins
    Muslim dynasty of Turkic-Mongol origin that ruled the majority of northern India from the early 16th to the mid-18th century, after which it continued to live as a considerably reduced and increasingly powerless entity until the mid-19th century.
  • Sep 19, 1533

    Pizarro invades the Inca Empire

    Pizarro invades the Inca Empire
    Atahuallpa, the 13th and last emperor of the Incas, dies by strangulation at the hands of Francisco Pizarro's Spanish conquistadors. The execution of Atahuallpa, the last free reigning emperor, marked the end of 300 years of Inca civilization.
  • Oct 13, 1545

    Council of Trent

    Council of Trent
    The Council of Trent (Latin: Concilium Tridentinum), was held between 1545 and 1563 in Trento (Trent) and Bologna, northern Italy, was one of the Roman Catholic Church's most key ecumenical councils. Prompted by the Protestant Reformation, it has been showed as the embodiment of the Counter-Reformation.
  • Sep 25, 1558

    Elizabeth I becomes Queen of France

    Elizabeth I becomes Queen of France
    was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess, the childless Elizabeth was the fifth and last monarch of the Tudor dynasty. Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII by second wife, Anne Boleyn, who was executed two and a half years after Elizabeth's birth.
  • Sep 25, 1566

    Philip II rules spain

    Philip II rules spain
    Champion of the Roman Catholic Counter-Reformation. During his reign the Spanish empire attained its best power, extent, and influence, though he failed to suppress the revolt of the Netherlands (beginning in 1566) and he lost the “Invincible Armada” in the attempted invasion of England (1588).
  • Jamestown, colony in Virginia, Founded

    Jamestown, colony in Virginia, Founded
    The founding of Jamestown, America’s first permanent English colony, in Virginia in 1607 – 13 years before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth in Massachusetts – sparked a series of cultural encounters that helped shape the nation and the world. The government, language, customs, beliefs and aspirations of these early Virginians are all part of the United States’ heritage today.
  • Louis XIV becomes King of france

    Louis XIV becomes King of france
    known as Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (le Roi-Soleil), was a monarch of the House of Bourbon who ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1643 until his death. His reign of 72 years and 110 days is the longest of any monarch of a major country in European history
    Louis began his personal rule of France in 1661 after the death of his chief minister
  • Qing Dynasty in China begins

    Qing Dynasty in China begins
    also Empire of the Great Qing, Great Qing or Manchu dynasty, was the last imperial dynasty of China, ruling from 1644 to 1912 with a brief, abortive restoration in 1917. It was preceded by the Ming dynasty and succeeded by the Republic of China. The Qing multi-cultural empire lasted almost three centuries and formed the territorial base for the modern Chinese state.
  • Thomas Hobbes writes Leviathan

    Thomas Hobbes writes Leviathan
    His 1651 book Leviathan established social contract theory, the foundation of most later Western political philosophy.Its name derives from the biblical Leviathan. The work concerns the structure of society and legitimate government, and is regarded as one of the earliest and most influential examples of social contract theory. Leviathan ranks as a classic western work on statecraft comparable to Machiavelli's The Prince. Written during the English Civil War (1642–1651),
  • Oliver Cromwell rules England

    Oliver Cromwell rules England
    From 1649 to 1653, Parliament ran England but from Cromwell's point of view, it was not a system that worked effectively and England, as a nation was suffering. As a result, Cromwell, backed by the army, sent home MP’s and he became the effective leader of England from 1653 to 1658.
  • Peter the great becomes Czar

    Peter the great becomes Czar
    ruled the Tsardom of Russia and later the Russian Empire from 7 May 27 April 1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his half-brother. Through a number of successful wars he expanded the Tsardom into a much larger empire that became a major European power. He led a cultural revolution that replaced some of the traditionalist and medieval social and political system with one that was modern, scientific, Europe-oriented, and based on The Enlightenment.
  • Catherine the great rules russia

    Catherine the great rules russia
    was the most renowned and the longest-ruling female leader of Russia, reigning from 9 July [O.S. 28 June] 1762 until her death in 1796 at the age of 67. Her reign was called Russia's golden age. She was born in Stettin, Pomerania, Prussia as Sophie Friederike Auguste von Anhalt-Zerbst-Dornburg, and came to power following a coup d'état and the assassination of her husband, Peter III, at the end of the Seven Years' War.
  • French Revolution Begins

    French Revolution Begins
    was a period of radical social and political upheaval in France from 1789 to 1799 that profoundly affected French and modern history, marking the decline of powerful monarchies and churches and the rise of democracy and nationalism. Popular resentment of the privileges enjoyed by the clergy and aristocracy grew amidst a financial crisis following two expensive wars and years of bad harvests, motivating demands for change.
  • US constitution is ratified

    US constitution is ratified
    When a bill of rights was proposed in Congress in 1789, North Carolina ratified the Constitution. Finally, Rhode Island, which had rejected the Constitution in March 1788 by popular referendum, called a ratifying convention in 1790 as specified by the Constitutional Convention.
  • Reign of Terror begins

    Reign of Terror begins
    The Reign of Terror, also known as The Terror, was a time of violence that happend after the onset of the French Revolution, incited by conflict between rival political factions, the Girondins and the Jacobins, and marked by mass executions of enemies of the revolution.
  • Age of Enlightment

    Age of Enlightment
    The Age of Enlightenment (or simply the Enlightenment or Age of Reason) was a cultural movement of intellectuals beginning in late 17th-century Europe emphasizing reason and individualism rather than tradition.
  • Napoleon becomes emperor

    Napoleon becomes emperor
    He took power in a coup d'état in 1799 and installed himself as First Consul. In 1804 he made himself emperor of the French people. He fought a series of wars, the Napoleonic Wars, that involved complex coalitions for and against him.
  • napoleon defeated @waterloo

    napoleon defeated @waterloo
    The Battle of Waterloo, which took place in Belgium on June 18, 1815, marked the final defeat of French military leader and emperor Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), who conquered much of continental Europe in the early 19th century.
  • Tokugawa Shogunate ends

    The Tokugawa Shogunate came to an official end in 1868, with the resignation of the 15th Tokugawa Shogun, Tokugawa Yoshinobu and the restoration (Ōsei fukko) of imperial rule. Despite this, the establishment of the Tokugawa shogunate brought Japan the longest period of peace and stability in its history, lasting well over 200 years.