What Makes the Greeks Memorable

Timeline created by twarnke
In History
  • Period:
    1,600 BCE
    to
    -20 BCE

    Compelling Question

    The Greeks made substantial discoveries in philosophy, architecture, science, physics, and many other subjects. The expansion, and then downfall, of the empire Alexander built contributed to the spread of Hellenistic culture. Greeks were recognized for their knowledge and skill, which is why so many records and artifacts of their achievements have survived.
  • -776 BCE

    Olympics

    Olympics
    The first recorded Olympics was held in Olympia, but there is evidence that the first one to take place could have been 500 prior. Regardless, the Greeks made the tradition of intense athletic competition between surrounding nations incredibly popular. This legacy continues today and involves the whole world, definitely making the Olympics a memorable attribute of Greece.
  • -750 BCE

    Homer

    Homer
    Homer began to write his famous pieces, The Odyssey and Iliad. These works spread across Western civilization through public orations and were eventually recorded and are still read today. Literature was a very significant attribute of Greece, but eventually, other nations began to write and perform as the Greeks had before them.
  • -508 BCE

    Democracy in Greece

    Democracy in Greece
    Cleisthenes was a lawmaker in Athens, and he is credited for implementing democracy into Greek city-states. After centuries of experimenting with different forms of government, they were able to develop a democratic setting that later would be used in several other societies in ancient and modern government.
  • -447 BCE

    Parthenon

    Parthenon
    The Parthenon was built as a replacement of a former temple destroyed by Persians, but it was more impressive and used to demonstrate the power and wealth in Athens. Greece used its architecture to express dominance and power, and it also inspired other nations - especially Rome - to make similar extravagant structures.
  • -425 BCE

    (Approximate Time) Socrates' Philosophy

    (Approximate Time) Socrates' Philosophy
    Throughout his lifetime, Socrates laid the foundation for subsequent moral philosophers. He is also responsible for creating the Socratic method.
  • -380 BCE

    Plato Created the Academy

    Plato Created the Academy
    Plato was unlike his tutor, Socrates, because he believed that knowledge should be recorded and shared. Plato decided to form the Academy to teach other thinkers about subjects such as astronomy, mathematics, philosophy, physics, along with others. This sparked greater interest in education and inspired more philosophers to learn and teach. Even after the Academy was closed, the concepts taught there continued to spread throughout Western civilization.
  • -336 BCE

    Alexander the Great Ascended to Power

    Alexander the Great Ascended to Power
    After his father's demise, Alexander the Great took his place as the ruler of Greece. At the time he was only twenty, but he went on to conquer adjacent nations and grew a vast empire. He spread Greek culture (Hellenism) as he conquered.
  • -323 BCE

    Division of Alexander the Great's Empire

    Division of Alexander the Great's Empire
    After Alexander's death, his empire was divided after years of conflict because his successor was never named. Ptolemy formed the Ptolemaic Dynasty. This dynasty upheld many traditions of Greek life and was home to the Great Library of Alexandra, founded by Ptolemy himself. Institutions such as these continued the Greek concept of deep thinking, even after the division of the once powerful empire.
  • -150 BCE

    (Approximate Time) Hipparchus Astronomy

    (Approximate Time) Hipparchus Astronomy
    Hipparchus was a Greek astronomer, mathematician, and geographer. In his time, he founded the principles of trigonometry and used his charting and observation of stars to develop the first longitude and latitude system. Most of his research is still implemented in contemporary education.
  • -146 BCE

    Defeat at Battle of Corinth

    Defeat at Battle of Corinth
    Ironically, the downfall of Greece resulted in the spread of Greek culture. When the Romans took control over Greece, they also adopted many of their cultural practices. Philosophy, architecture, and artwork were all modeled from Greek society and spread throughout the Roman empire.