Ethical Philosophers and their respective ethical philosophies

Timeline created by st.matthew.godin_3839642619...
  • 1588 BCE

    Thomas Hobbes

    Thomas Hobbes
    Hobbes’ moral positivism anticipates the chaotic outcome if laws are not abided. We all believe that the purpose of the government is to protect the rights of its people, preserve justice and enforce the laws. It is a must for every nation to have someone who would manage and administer them. Hence, the creation of laws and the obedience of its subjects are important in the order and maintenance of peace in countries (Roa, 2007).
  • 399 BCE

    Socrates

    Socrates
    Socrates was an Athenian Philosopher whose questions and opinions clashed with the current course of Athenian politics and society. According to Socrates, “no one commits an evil act knowingly and doing wrong arises out of ignorance.” A person will commit only moral evil if he lacks moral knowledge. Sometimes, a person may have knowledge but he deliberately commits an evil act to satisfy his hidden motive.
  • 384 BCE

    Aristotle

    Aristotle
    n Arabic Philosophy, he was known simply as “The First Teacher;” in the West, he was “The Philosopher.” Aristotle argued that virtues are good habits that we acquire, which regulate our emotions. For example, in response to a natural feeling of fear, one should develop the virtue of courage, which allows a person to be firm when facing danger or fear.
  • 348 BCE

    Plato

    Plato
    Plato ranks among the greatest philosophers of the world, and is viewed by many scholars as the most important Philosopher of Western civilization. Plato held that moral values are objective in the sense that they exist in a spirit-like realm beyond subjective human conventions. Plato’s main concern is to challenge the views most people have about goodness, for it is here that they go disastrously wrong in trying to live happy lives.