Burma's recent political past

  • First elections in 20 years

    First elections in 20 years
    After Aung San Suu Kyi and the National League for Democracy sweep polls in 1990, Suu Kyi spent almost decades under house arrest. Her party does not run in the November 2010 elections. Critics call the election a farce. See the Financial Times' take on the election.
  • Aung San Suu Kyi freed from house arrest

    Aung San Suu Kyi freed from house arrest
    Hundreds meet outside the widely adored Nobel Prize winner's house to welcome her out of a decades-long, mostly homebound isolation. Her release comes days after a military-allied party declares victory in the country's elections. Voice of America covered the story here.
  • Power changes hands

    Power changes hands
    President Thein Sein and Burma's new government are inaugurated in a secret ceremony. The army and members of the former regime are expected to hold continued influence in the country's affairs.
    Read The Guardian's story here.
  • A meeting of two minds

    A meeting of two minds
    Aung San Suu Kyi and Thein Sein meet amidst apparent efforts by Burmese authorities to rebuild bridges with dissenters and improve the government's image. The hourlong meeting goes well, Aung San Suu Kyi's aide tells the BBC. The BBC has the story here.
  • Labor unions, striking become legal

    Labor unions, striking become legal
    A law that changes labor in Burma after nearly 50 years allows workers to strike with advanced notice and form uions of 30 members or more. Read the story by the BBC here.
  • Amnesty for Political Prisoners

    Amnesty for Political Prisoners
    Sources say 100 to 200 political prisoners are released along with a number of other prisoners. The international community calls for more political prisoners in Burma be freed. But this gesture and the others leading up to it, are viewed as landmark moments of openness for Burma. See a story by The New York Times here.
  • Burma granted ASEAN chair

    Burma granted ASEAN chair
    Leaders of 10-member group in Southeast Asia (ASEAN) has agreed to grant Burma the chairmanship of the bloc in 2014 and welcome Myanmar's "signigicant progess down the path of democracy." Read BBC take on this event.
  • NLD registered as political party

    NLD registered as political party
    The National League for Democracy, led by Aung San Suu Kyi, has officially registered as a political party and contest in Burma's upcoming elections. Aung San Suu Kyi is considering running for a seat in the parliament. The date of the elections has not yet been set. For more information, click on this link to a BBC report.
  • Ceasefire agreement with rebel group signed

    Ceasefire agreement with rebel group signed
    Burmese government has reached a ceasefire deal with an ethnic rebel group, the Karen National Union. Both sides signed the agreement after talks in the Karen state. The rebel group has been fighting for autonomy for more than 60 years. Read more on The New York Times.
  • Key political prisoners released

    Key political prisoners released
    More than 600 political prisioners, including members of the student group who held the uprising in 1988, are released. Human Rights Watch praised this event as "a crucial development in promoting respect for human rights in Burma." Here is the report on Human Rights Watch website.
  • Aung San Suu Kyi wins seat in Parliament

    Aung San Suu Kyi wins seat in Parliament
    Aung San Suu Kyi has won her bid for a seat in the parliament, her party claimed. The Nobel Peace laureate, who spent most of the last two decades under house arrest, is expected to hold office for the first time. Read more about her historic win in The New York Times.