Archaic period

Timeline created by lisa.k17
In History
  • -776 BCE

    Traditional date for first historical Olympia

    Traditional date for first historical Olympia
    The ancient Olympic Games were originally a festival, or celebration of and for Zeus; later, events such as a footrace, a javelin contest, and wrestling matches were added. The Olympic Games were a series of athletic competitions among representatives of city-states and one of the Panhellenic Games of ancient Greece.
  • -754 BCE

    Polydorus becomes king of Sparta

    Polydorus becomes king of Sparta
  • -735 BCE

    Perdiccas I of Macedon flees Argos to Macedonia to conquer the land

    Perdiccas I of Macedon flees Argos to Macedonia to conquer the land
  • -734 BCE

    Polydorus sends colonists to Italy

    Polydorus sends colonists to Italy
    Polydorus changed the constitution of Sparta so that the Kings and the Gerousia (28 chosen men above the age of 60) could reject decisions made by the Spartan Apella (the male citizen body).
  • -721 BCE

    Lelantine war between Chalcis and Eretria

    Lelantine war between Chalcis and Eretria
    a military conflict between the two ancient Greek city states Chalcis and Eretria in Euboea which took place in the early Archaic period. The reason for war was the struggle for the fertile Lelantine Plain on the island Euboea. Due to the economic importance of the two participating poleis, the conflict spread considerably, with many further city states joining either side, resulting in much of Greece being at war. The only war in Greece where allied cities rather than single ones were involved.
  • -719 BCE

    Polydorus (king of Sparta) murdered by Polymarchus

    Polydorus (king of Sparta) murdered by Polymarchus
  • -690 BCE

    Pheidon becomes tyrant of Argos

    Pheidon becomes tyrant of Argos
    Pheidon rose to power after he seized control of Argos from the reining monarchy. In doing so, he became the King of Argos and seemed to have ruled with a level of toughness that have caused some to label him as a tyrant. However, it is important to note that the city-state began to thrive under his leadership, which enabled Argos to grow in strength.
  • -656 BCE

    Cypselus subjects Corinth to tyranny

    Cypselus subjects Corinth to tyranny
    the first tyrant of Corinth in the 7th century BCE. Corinth had been involved in wars and the Corinthians were unhappy with their rulers. At the time, Cypselus was the archon in charge of the military, and he used his influence to expel his enemies, but allowed them to set up colonies in northwest Greece. He increased trade with the colonies in Italy and Sicily. He ruled for 30years and in 627 BCE was succeeded as tyrant by his son Periander, who was considered one of the Seven Sages of Greece.
  • -650 BCE

    Sparta crushes a Messenian revolt

  • -632 BCE

    Cylon (Athenian noble) seizes Acropolis and tries to make himself king/tyrant but fails

    Cylon (Athenian noble) seizes Acropolis and tries to make himself king/tyrant but fails
    was an Athenian associated with the first reliably dated event in Athenian history, the Cylonian Affair, an attempted seizure of power in the city. His attempted coup, which he undertook during the Olympics after the oracle at Delphi advised him to strike during a festival to Zeus, was a failure. He was supported in this undertaking by the city-state of Megara, where his father-in-law, Theagenes, was a tyrant.
  • -621 BCE

    Draco (Athenian lawgiver) issues code of laws with many crimes punishable by death

    Draco (Athenian lawgiver) issues code of laws with many crimes punishable by death
    was the first recorded legislator of Athens in Ancient Greece. He replaced the prevailing system of oral law and blood feud by a written code to be enforced only by a court of law. Draco was the first democratic legislator, he was requested by the Athenian citizens to be a lawgiver for the city-state, but the citizens were fully unaware that Draco would establish harsh laws
  • -594 BCE

    Solon (Athenian statesman) becomes Archon

    Solon (Athenian statesman) becomes Archon
    was an Athenian statesman, lawmaker and poet. He is remembered particularly for his efforts to legislate against political, economic and moral decline in archaic Athens. His reforms failed in the short term, yet he is often credited with having laid the foundations for Athenian democracy. He wrote poetry for pleasure, as patriotic propaganda and in defence of his constitutional reforms. Solon introduces legislation to lessen the suffering of the poor, but fails to address its cause.
  • -590 BCE

    Sappho (Greek poet) flourishes on island of Lesbos

    Sappho (Greek poet) flourishes on island of Lesbos
    was an archaic Greek poet from the island of Lesbos. Sappho is known for her lyric poetry, written to be sung and accompanied by a lyre. Most of Sappho's poetry is now lost, and what is extant has survived only in fragmentary form, except for one complete poem – the "Ode to Aphrodite". As well as lyric poetry, ancient commentators claimed that Sappho wrote elegiac and iambic poetry.
  • -569 BCE

    Pythagoras born

    Pythagoras born
    Pythagoras was a Greek philosopher known for many things. Among his accomplishments in life was the founding of the religion known as Pythagoreanism. The works of Pythagoras continue to influence and impact math and, in particular, geometry, to a great deal even well into the modern era. A brief look at his life reveals he was both a historically important and controversial figure.
  • -565 BCE

    Peisistratos (Athenian general) organises Diakrioi, a party of poor people

    Peisistratos (Athenian general) organises Diakrioi, a party of poor people
    a good tyrant who took Athens by force during 561-527 BC until death. While in power, he did not hesitate to confront the aristocracy, and he greatly reduced their privileges, confiscated their lands and gave them to the poor, and funded many religious and artistic programs. He sought to increase "the unity and majesty of the Athenian state" by protecting foreign immigrants, increasing the wealth of the poor and contributing to the construction of an aqueduct, improving the city's water supply.
  • -546 BCE

    Persian Subjugation of Ionian Poleis

  • -525 BCE

    Persian Cambyses II, son of Cyrus the Great takes Egypt

    Persian Cambyses II, son of Cyrus the Great takes Egypt
    Cambyses II further expanded the empire into Egypt during the Late Period by defeating the Egyptian Pharaoh Psamtik III during the battle of Pelusium in 525 BC. After the Egyptian campaign and the truce with Libya, Cambyses invaded the Kingdom of Kush (located in what is now Sudan) but with little success
  • -515 BCE

    Hippias becomes sole ruler after the death of his brother Hipparchus

    Hippias becomes sole ruler after the death of his brother Hipparchus
    was one of the sons of Peisistratus (Hippias and Hipparchus who was murdered by men anti-tyrants) and was a bad tyrant of Athens between about 527 BC and 510 BC when Cleomenes I of Sparta successfully invaded Athens and forced Hippias to leave Athens. He imposed high and unfair taxes on the people during his reign and ruled harshly and cruelly, seeking vengeance for his brother's death.
  • -510 BCE

    Fall of the Peisistratid tyranny

    Fall of the Peisistratid tyranny
    Peisistratis had seized Athens by force. He was a peaceful ruler, and is believed to have shown sympathy towards people living in rural areas (farmers), whose lives were considerably more difficult than those of urban citizens. Upon his death, Athens' power was significantly less than that of Sparta as his two sons came to rule.
  • -507 BCE

    Cleisthenes (Greek reformer) takes power and begins democracy

    Cleisthenes (Greek reformer) takes power and begins democracy
    was an ancient Athenian lawgiver credited with reforming the constitution of ancient Athens and setting it on a democratic footing in 508/7 BC. For these accomplishments, historians refer to him as "the father of Athenian democracy." He was also credited with increasing the power of the Athenian citizens’ assembly and for reducing the power of the nobility over Athenian politics.
  • -498 BCE

    Ionians and Greek allies invaded and burned Sardis

  • -495 BCE

    Birth or Pericles

    Birth or Pericles
    Pericles was a prominent and influential Greek statesman, orator and general of Athens during the Golden Age — specifically the time between the Persian and Peloponnesian wars.
  • -492 BCE

    Darius I of Persia invades Greece

    Darius I of Persia invades Greece
    The 1st Persian invasion of Greece, during the Persian Wars, ended with the Athenian victory at the Battle of Marathon. The invasion, consisting of 2 distinct campaigns, was ordered by the Persian king Darius I to punish the city-states of Athens and Eretria. These cities had supported the cities of Ionia during their revolt against Persian rule, thus incurring the wrath of Darius. Darius also saw the opportunity to extend his empire into Europe, and to secure its western frontier but failed.
  • -490 BCE

    Themistoscles and Miltiades (Athenians) defeat Darius at Marathon, Phidippides runs with news

  • -480 BCE

    Battle of Thermopylae

    Battle of Thermopylae
    The Greek army, comprising King Leonidas, 300 Spartans and citizens of other poleis, was defeated by that of Xerxes I after a battle lasting three days.
  • -480 BCE

    Battle of Salamis

    In this battle, the Greek naval fleet, which was led by Themistocles, defeated that of Xerxes I of Persia
  • Period:
    -800 BCE
    to
    -480 BCE

    Archaic period

    Archaic Greece was the period in Greek history lasting from the eighth century BC to the second Persian invasion of Greece in 480 BC, following the Greek Dark Ages and succeeded by the Classical period.
  • Period:
    -800 BCE
    to
    -750 BCE

    Greek alphabet established

  • Period:
    -800 BCE
    to
    -700 BCE

    Homer writes the Iliad and Odyssey

    Homer is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems which are the central works of ancient Greek literature.
  • Period:
    -800 BCE
    to
    -500 BCE

    Greek colonisation of the Mediterranean and Black Sea

  • Period:
    -757 BCE
    to
    -738 BCE

    First Messenian war

    a war between Messenia and Sparta due to Sparta's requirement for expansion to make room for over population. This resulted in a Spartan victory and the Messenians reduced to helot slaves.
  • Period:
    -685 BCE
    to
    -665 BCE

    Second Messenian war

    A major revolt by the Messenians occurred, leading to the Second Messenian War. This war was significant as the other states on the Peloponnesian peninsula supported Messenia. Sparta won this war, which lasted for 17 years.
  • Period:
    -645 BCE
    to
    -560 BCE

    Spartan wars with Tegea (unsuccessful)

  • Period:
    -642 BCE
    to
    -634 BCE

    Battus establishes a Greek colony in Cyrene and Libya

    was the founder of the Ancient Greek colony of Cyrene. He was its first king, the first Greek king in Africa and the founder of the Battiad dynasty.
  • Period:
    -546 BCE
    to
    -545 BCE

    Persian conquest of Ionian Greek city states

  • Period:
    -499 BCE
    to
    -494 BCE

    Ionian cities rebel against Persian rule