The U.S. Civil Rights Movement

  • Murder of Emmett Till August (1954)

    Murder of Emmett Till August (1954)
    Emmett Louis Till (July 25, 1941 – August 28, 1955) was a 14-year-old African American who was lynched in Mississippi in 1955, after being accused of offending a white woman in her family's grocery store.
  • Brown vs Board of Education (1954)

    Brown vs Board of Education (1954)
    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka was a landmark 1954 Supreme Court case in which the justices ruled unanimously that racial segregation of children in public schools was unconstitutional.
  • Rosa Parks and Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955)

    Rosa Parks and Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955)
    The boycott took place from December 5, 1955, to December 20, 1956, and is regarded as the first large-scale U.S. demonstration against segregation. Four days before the boycott began, Rosa Parks, an African American woman, was arrested and fined for refusing to yield her bus seat to a white man.
  • Martin Luther-King and the Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955)

    Martin Luther-King and the Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955)
    Martin Luther King, Jr., into the spotlight as one of the most important leaders of the American civil rights movement. The event that triggered the boycott took place in Montgomery on December 1, 1955, after seamstress Rosa Parks refused to give her seat to a white passenger on a city bus
  • Civil Rights Act (1957)

    Civil Rights Act (1957)
    In 1957, President Eisenhower sent Congress a proposal for civil rights legislation. ... The new act established the Civil Rights Section of the Justice Department and empowered federal prosecutors to obtain court injunctions against interference with the right to vote.
  • James Meredith, University of Mississippi (1962)

    James Meredith, University of Mississippi (1962)
    James Howard Meredith (born June 25, 1933) is the first African-American student admitted to the racially segregated University of Mississippi.
  • March on Washington (1963)

    March on Washington (1963)
    The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, also known as simply the March on Washington or The Great March on Washington, was held in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, August 28, 1963. The purpose of the march was to advocate for the civil and economic rights of African Americans.
  • Birmingham Riots (1963)

    Birmingham Riots (1963)
    The Birmingham riot of 1963 was a civil disorder and riot in Birmingham, Alabama, that was provoked by bombings on the night of May 11, 1963. The bombings targeted African-American leaders of the Birmingham campaign, a mass protest for civil rights.
  • Mississippi Civil Rights Workers' Murders (1964)

    Mississippi Civil Rights Workers' Murders (1964)
    The murders of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner, also known as the Freedom Summer murders, the Mississippi civil rights workers' murders or the Mississippi Burning murders, refers to three activists who were abducted and murdered in Philadelphia, Mississippi, in June 1964 during the Civil Rights Movement.
  • Civil Rights Act (1964)

    Civil Rights Act (1964)
    The Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a landmark civil rights and labor law in the United States that outlaws discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, and later sexual orientation and gender identity