Civil RIghts Movement

Timeline created by john.broll
In History
  • The Integration of the Armed Forces

    The Integration of the Armed Forces
    Harry S. Truman was the 33rd president of the United States, serving from 1945 to 1953, succeeding upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt after serving as the 34th vice president. He implemented the Marshall Plan to rebuild the economy of Western Europe, and established the Truman Doctrine and NATO.
  • The Supreme Court Decision of Plessy v. Ferguson

    The Supreme Court Decision of Plessy v. Ferguson
    Ferguson, legal case in which the U.S. Supreme Court, on May 18, 1896, by a seven-to-one majority (one justice did not participate), advanced the controversial “separate but equal” doctrine for assessing the constitutionality of racial segregation laws.
  • The Integration of Major League Baseball

    The Integration of Major League Baseball
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    In 1945, the Jim Crow policies of baseball changed forever when Branch Rickey and Jackie Robinson of the Negro League's Kansas City Monarchs agreed to a contract that would bring Robinson into the major leagues in 1947. ... Rickey's interest in integrating baseball began early in his career.
  • The Tuskegee Airmen

    The Tuskegee Airmen
    The Tuskegee Airmen were a group of primarily African-American military pilots and airmen who fought in World War II. They formed the 332nd Expeditionary Operations Group and the 477th Bombardment Group of the United States Army Air Forces.
  • The Supreme Court Decision of Brown v. Board of Education

    The Supreme Court Decision of Brown v. Board of Education
    On May 17, 1954, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren delivered the unanimous ruling in the landmark civil rights case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. State-sanctioned segregation of public schools was a violation of the 14th amendment and was therefore unconstitutional.
  • The Supreme Court Decision of Brown v. Board of Education

    The Supreme Court Decision of Brown v. Board of Education
    On May 17, 1954, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren delivered the unanimous ruling in the landmark civil rights case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. State-sanctioned segregation of public schools was a violation of the 14th amendment and was therefore unconstitutional.
  • The Death of Emmitt Till

    The Death of Emmitt Till
    On August 28, 1955, while visiting family in Money, Mississippi, 14-year-old Emmett Till, an African American from Chicago, is brutally murdered for allegedly flirting with a white woman four days earlier.
  • The Death of Emmitt Till

    The Death of Emmitt Till
    On August 28, 1955, while visiting family in Money, Mississippi, 14-year-old Emmett Till, an African American from Chicago, is brutally murdered for allegedly flirting with a white woman four days earlier.
  • The Montgomery Bus Boycott

    The Montgomery Bus Boycott
    The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a civil rights protest during which African Americans refused to ride city buses in Montgomery, Alabama, to protest segregated seating. The boycott took place from December 5, 1955, to December 20, 1956, and is regarded as the first large-scale U.S. demonstration against segregation.
  • The Integration of Little Rock High School

    The Integration of Little Rock High School
    The desegregation of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, gained national attention on September 3, 1957, when Governor Orval Faubus mobilized the Arkansas National Guard in an effort to prevent nine African American students from integrating the high school. ... Campbell, Kentucky to oversee the integration.
  • The Civil Rights Act of 1957

    The Civil Rights Act of 1957
    On September 9, 1957, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1957. ... It established the Civil Rights Division in the Justice Department, and empowered federal officials to prosecute individuals that conspired to deny or abridge another citizen's right to vote.
  • The Greensboro Four Lunch Counter Sit-In

    The Greensboro Four Lunch Counter Sit-In
    The Greensboro sit-in was a civil rights protest that started in 1960, when young African American students staged a sit-in at a segregated Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, and refused to leave after being denied service. The sit-in movement soon spread to college towns throughout the South.
  • The Freedom Rides by Freedom Riders of 1961

    The Freedom Rides by Freedom Riders of 1961
    Freedom Riders were civil rights activists who rode interstate buses into the segregated Southern United States in 1961 and subsequent years to challenge the non-enforcement of the United States Supreme Court decisions Morgan v. Virginia (1946) and Boynton v. Virginia (1960), which ruled that segregated public buses ...
  • The Twenty-Fourth Amendment

    The Twenty-Fourth Amendment
    The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay poll tax or other ...
  • The Integration of the University of Mississippi

    The Integration of the University of Mississippi
    On September 30, 1962, riots erupted on the campus of the University of Mississippi in Oxford where locals, students, and committed segregationists had gathered to protest the enrollment of James Meredith, a black Air Force veteran attempting to integrate the all-white school.
  • The Assassination of John F. Kennedy in Dallas, Texas

    The Assassination of John F. Kennedy in Dallas, Texas
    John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, was assassinated on Friday, November 22, 1963, at 12:30 p.m. Central Standard Time in Dallas, Texas, while riding in a presidential motorcade through Dealey Plaza.
  • The Integration of the University of Alabama by Vivian Malone & James A Hood.

    The Integration of the University of Alabama by Vivian Malone & James A Hood.
    Vivian Juanita Malone Jones was one of the first two black students to enroll at the University of Alabama in 1963, and in 1965 became the university's first black graduate
  • The March on Washington & “I Have a Dream” Speech by MLK

    The March on Washington & “I Have a Dream” Speech by MLK
    I Have a Dream" is a public speech that was delivered by American civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, in which he called for civil and economic rights and an end to racism in the United States.
  • The Civil Rights Act of 1964 signed by President Johnson

    The Civil Rights Act of 1964 signed by President Johnson
    This act, signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson on July 2, 1964, prohibited discrimination in public places, provided for the integration of schools and other public facilities, and made employment discrimination illegal. This document was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since Reconstruction.
  • The Assassination of Malcolm X

    The Assassination of Malcolm X
    Malcolm X was an African American Muslim minister and human rights activist who was a popular figure during the civil rights movement. He is best known for his time spent as a vocal spokesman for the Nation of Islam.
  • The Selma to Montgomery March: “Bloody Sunday”

    The Selma to Montgomery March: “Bloody Sunday”
    On "Bloody Sunday," March 7, 1965, some 600 civil rights marchers headed east out of Selma on U.S. Route 80. They got only as far as the Edmund Pettus Bridge six blocks away, where state and local lawmen attacked them with billy clubs and tear gas and drove them back into Selma
  • The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee

    The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee
    Martin Luther King Jr. Martin Luther King Jr., an African-American clergyman and civil rights leader, was fatally shot at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968, at 6:01 p.m. CST. He was rushed to St.
  • The Voting Rights Act of 1968

    The Voting Rights Act of 1968
    The Civil Rights Act of 1968 ( Pub. ... The 1968 act expanded on previous acts and prohibited discrimination concerning the sale, rental, and financing of housing based on race, religion, national origin, and since 1974, sex. Since 1988, the act protects people with disabilities and families with children.
  • The Voting Rights Act of 1965

    The Voting Rights Act of 1965
    This act was signed into law on August 6, 1965, by President Lyndon Johnson. It outlawed the discriminatory voting practices adopted in many southern states after the Civil War, including literacy tests as a prerequisite to voting.