The Roaring 20's

Timeline created by Smithy1414
In History
  • The IBM corporation is founded

    The IBM corporation is founded
    International Business Machines Corporation is an American multinational information technology company headquartered in Armonk, New York, United States, with operations in over 170 countries.
  • 19th amendment is ratified by congress

    19th amendment is ratified by congress
    In 1919, the 19th Amendment, which stated that “the rights of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex,” passed both houses of Congress and was sent to the states for ratification.
  • The 18th amendment goes into affect

    The 18th amendment goes into affect
    From State to Federal Prohibition Legislation. By 1916, 23 of 48 states had passed anti-saloon legislation. ... On January 29, 1919, Congress ratified the 18th Amendment, which prohibited the manufacturing, transportation and sale of alcohol within the United States; it would go into effect the following January.
  • The League of nations is founded

    The League of nations is founded
    League of Nations. League of Nations, an organization for international cooperation established on January 10, 1920, at the initiative of the victorious Allied Powers at the end of World War I.
  • Radio station KDKA airs the first commercially broadcast program

    Radio station KDKA airs the first commercially broadcast program
    Westinghouse Radio Station KDKA, 1920. Westinghouse Radio Station KDKA was a world pioneer of commercial radio broadcasting. Transmitting with a power of 100 watts on a wavelength of 360 meters, KDKA began scheduled programming with the Harding-Cox Presidential election returns on November 2, 1920
  • The palmer raids arrest and deport over 6000 suspected radicals

    The palmer raids arrest and deport over 6000 suspected radicals
    The Palmer Raids were a series of raids conducted during the First Red Scare by the United States Department of Justice under the administration of President Woodrow Wilson to capture and arrest suspected radical leftists, mostly Italian and Eastern European immigrants and especially anarchists and communists,
  • Warren G. Harding is elected president

    Warren G. Harding is elected president
    Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was the 29th President of the United States from 1921 until his death in 1923, a member of the Republican Party.
  • Sacco and Vanzetti trial concludes

    Sacco and Vanzetti trial concludes
    The authorities concluded that the behavior of Sacco and Vanzetti meant that the men were guilty of something—presumably the payroll murders. The trial of Sacco and Vanzetti for the South Braintree murders was held in Dedham, Massachusetts, from May 31 to July 14, 1921
  • Readers digest is founded

    Readers digest is founded
    Reader's Digest is an American general-interest family magazine, published ten times a year. Formerly based in Chappaqua, New York, it is now headquartered in Midtown Manhattan. The magazine was founded in 1922, by DeWitt Wallace and Lila Bell Wallace.
  • The teapot dome scandal is uncovered

    The teapot dome scandal is uncovered
    Warren G. Harding transferred supervision of the naval oil-reserve lands from the navy to the Department of the Interior in 1921, Fall secretly granted to Harry F. Sinclair of the Mammoth Oil Company exclusive rights to the Teapot Dome (Wyoming) reserves (April 7, 1922).
  • First game in the newly built yankee stadium is played

    First game in the newly built yankee stadium is played
    April 18, 1923: Yankee Stadium officially opens for the Yankees' home opener. Babe Ruth hits the ballpark's first home run as the Yankees defeat the Boston Red Sox, 4–3.[1]
    May 12, 1923: First boxing match at the stadium, featuring former heavyweight champion Jess Willard against Floyd Johnson. It draws 63,000 spectators.[2][3]
    October 8, 1926: the St. Louis Cardinals defeat the Yankees 3–2 to win the 1926 World Series, four games to three.
  • President warren G. Harding dies

    President warren G. Harding dies
    heart attack but maybe wife poisioned him
  • President Calvin Coolidge is elected president

    President Calvin Coolidge is elected president
    John Calvin Coolidge Jr. was an American politician and the 30th President of the United States. A Republican lawyer from New England, born in Vermont, Coolidge worked his way up the ladder of Massachusetts state politics, eventually becoming governor.
  • Adolf Hitler leads a failed attempt to overthrow the German government

    Adolf Hitler leads a failed attempt to overthrow the German government
    Hitler and his associates planned to seize Munich and later to use Munich as a base for a march against Germany's Weimar Republic government
  • Ellis Island closes as an immigration point to the united states

    Ellis Island closes as an immigration point to the united states
    Ellis Island closes. On this day in 1954, Ellis Island, the gateway to America, shuts it doors after processing more than 12 million immigrants since opening in 1892. ... Only two percent of all immigrants were denied entrance into the U.S.
  • The ford motor company announces the creation of 40 hour work week

    The ford motor company announces the creation of 40 hour work week
    The Ford Motor Company advanced the idea in 1914, when it scaled back from a 48-hour to a 40-hour workweek after founder Henry Ford believed that too many hours were bad for workers' productivity. The formation of unions helped to strengthen the idea of working five days a week as well.
  • The national origins act is passed limiting immigration

    The national origins act is passed limiting immigration
    the Immigration Act of 1924 (The Johnson-Reed Act) The Immigration Act of 1924 limited the number of immigrants allowed entry into the United States through a national origins quota. ... In 1917, the U.S. Congress enacted the first widely restrictive immigration law.
  • George Gershwin releases "Rhapsody in blue"

    George Gershwin releases "Rhapsody in blue"
    Rhapsody in Blue is a 1924 musical composition by American composer George Gershwin for solo piano and jazz band, which combines elements of classical music with jazz-influenced effects. The composition was commissioned by bandleader Paul Whiteman.
  • The first winter olympics are held

    The first winter olympics are held
    The 1924 Winter Olympics, officially known as the I Olympic Winter Games, were a winter multi-sport event which was held in 1924 in Chamonix, France.
  • The Great Gatsby is published by F. Scott Fitzgerald

    The Great Gatsby is published by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    The Great Gatsby is a 1925 novel written by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald that follows a cast of characters living in the fictional towns of West Egg and East Egg on prosperous Long Island in the summer of 1922.
  • Adolf Hitler publishes Mein Kampf

    Adolf Hitler publishes Mein Kampf
    Mein Kampf is a 1925 autobiographical book by Nazi Party leader Adolf Hitler. The work describes the process by which Hitler became antisemitic and outlines his political ideology and future plans for Germany. Volume 1 of Mein Kampf was published in 1925 and Volume 2 in 1926.
  • Scopes monkey trial begins in Dayton, TN

    Scopes monkey trial begins in Dayton, TN
    Monkey Trial begins. In Dayton, Tennessee, the so-called “Monkey Trial” begins with John Thomas Scopes, a young high school science teacher, accused of teaching evolution in violation of a Tennessee state law.
  • Langston Hughes publishes his first set of poems in his The weary blues

    Langston Hughes publishes his first set of poems in his The weary blues
    Langston Hughes was born on February 1, 1902, in Joplin, Missouri. He published his first poem in 1921. He attended Columbia University, but left after one year to travel. His poetry was later promoted by Vachel Lindsay, and Hughes published his first book in 1926.
  • Gertrude ederle is the first women to swim the english channel

    Gertrude ederle is the first women to swim the english channel
    Gertrude Caroline Ederle was an American competition swimmer, Olympic champion, and former world record-holder in five events. On August 6, 1926, she became the first woman to swim across the English Channel. Among other nicknames, the press sometimes called her "Queen of the Waves."
  • The great Mississippi flood displaced 700,000 people

    The great Mississippi flood displaced 700,000 people
    The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 was the most destructive river flood in the history of the ... Ninety-four percent of the more than 630,000 people affected by the flood lived in the states of ... More than 200,000 African Americans were displaced from their homes along the Lower Mississippi River
  • Charles lindbergh makes the first non-stop trans-Atlantic flight

    Charles lindbergh makes the first non-stop trans-Atlantic flight
    Charles lindbergh was the first too fly across the Atlantic Ocean.
  • Babe ruth hits 60 home runs

    Babe ruth hits 60 home runs
    Babe Ruth got his 60th home run.
  • The holland tunnel connecting NYC and NJ opens

    The holland tunnel connecting NYC and NJ opens
    At the time of its opening, the Holland Tunnel was the longest continuous underwater vehicular tunnel in the world. The Holland Tunnel is one of three vehicular crossings between Manhattan and New Jersey, the others being the Lincoln Tunnel and the George Washington Bridge
  • The first film with sound "the jazz singer" debuts

    The first film with sound "the jazz singer" debuts
    On December 30, 1927, The Jazz Singer, the first commercially successful full-length feature film with sound, debuts at the Blue Mouse Theater at 1421 5th Avenue in Seattle. The movie uses Warner Brothers' Vitaphone sound-on-disc technology to reproduce the musical score and sporadic episodes of synchronized speech
  • Alexander Fleming discovers penicillin

    Alexander Fleming discovers penicillin
    In 1928 Alexander Fleming (1881–1955) discovered penicillin, made from the Penicillium notatum mold, but he did not receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery until 1945
  • Mickey mouse makes his first appearance in the short film "steamboat Willie"

    Mickey mouse makes his first appearance in the short film "steamboat Willie"
    On November 18, 1928, Mickey Mouse made his movie debut in Steamboat Willie, one of the earliest animated cartoons. This seven-minute film, directed by Walt Disney, was the first to combine animation technology with synchronized sound.
  • Herbert Hoover is elected president

    Herbert Hoover is elected president
    Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964) was an American engineer, businessman and politician who served as the 31st President of the United States from 1929 to 1933 during the Great Depression.
  • Chicago’s st. Valentine’s Day massacre

    Chicago’s st. Valentine’s Day massacre
    7 memeber were shot
  • Stock market crashes on ‘Black Tuesday’

    Stock market crashes on ‘Black Tuesday’
    The Wall Street Crash of 1929, also known as the Stock Market Crash of 1929 or the Great Crash, is the stock market crash that occurred in late October, 1929. It started on October 24 ("Black Thursday") and continued until October 29, 1929 ("Black Tuesday"), when share prices on the New York Stock Exchange collapsed.
  • Emelia Earhart attempts to fly around the world

    Amelia Earhart is about to attempt to fly around the world. ... Amelia Rose Earhart plans to take off from Oakland, Calif., sometime between June 23 and 26, and return two and a half weeks later. If successful, she would become the youngest woman ever to circumnavigate the globe in a single-engine airplane.