Period7

APUSH Unit 7 (1890-1945) Part 3

  • Politics: Election of 1828

    Politics: Election of 1828
    (R) Herbert Hoover defeated (D) Alfred Smith.
  • Religion: Fundamentalist

    Religion: Fundamentalist
    Opposing modernism and modernist thought, they taught that every word of the Bible was fundamentally true.
  • Religion: Modernism

    Religion: Modernism
    Influencing the role of women, scientific knowledge, and the Social Gospel movement, they supported Darwin's theory of evolution and modern-day science.
  • 1920's Economy: Impact of the Automobile

    1920's Economy: Impact of the Automobile
    Replaced the railroad industry as the key promoter of economic growth.
  • 1920's African American Identity: United Negro Improvement Association

    1920's African American Identity: United Negro Improvement Association
    Founded by Marcus Garvey, it advocate Black pride.
  • 1920's African American Identity: Harlem Renaissance

    1920's African American Identity: Harlem Renaissance
    Blacks faced discrimination in the North and South. Blacks migrated to Harlem, where it became famous for its concentration of Black actors, artists, musicians, and writers.
  • Prohibition: 18th Amendment and Volstead Act

    Prohibition: 18th Amendment and Volstead Act
    Was passed to save grain and to maintain a sober workplace; although, it didn't stop anyone from drinking it (bootleg alcohol).
  • 1920's African American Identity: The Jazz Age

    1920's African American Identity: The Jazz Age
    Brought north by Black musicians, the jazz age became a symbol of the "new" and "modern" culture of the cities.
  • Politics: Business Doctrine

    Politics: Business Doctrine
    Transformed laissez-faire Republicans into Republicans who advocated the federal government to an extent.
  • Politics: Election of 1920

    Politics: Election of 1920
    (R) Warren G. Harding was elected president over (D) James Cox, although through compromise.
  • Politics: Domestic Policy

    Politics: Domestic Policy
    Harding reduced the income tax, increased tariff rates under Fordney-McCumber Tariff Act of 1922, and established the Bureau of the Budget.
  • 1920's Culture: Women at home

    1920's Culture: Women at home
    Separation of labor between men and women continued, but washing devices eased women's jobs.
  • 1920's Culture: Revolution in morals

    1920's Culture: Revolution in morals
    Men and women revolted against sexual taboos in the 1920s. Promiscuity increased.
  • 1920's Culture: Divorce

    1920's Culture: Divorce
    Women's suffrage forced lawmakers to listen to feminists. Liberalized divorce laws resulted in 1 and 6 divorced marriages by 1930.
  • 1920's Culture: Education

    1920's Culture: Education
    The value of education in regards to economic opportunity increased. 25% of school-aged adults graduated from high school around this time.
  • 1920's Culture: Women in the Labor Force

    1920's Culture: Women in the Labor Force
    Employed women lived in the cities, where they worked as clerks, nurses, teachers, and domestics, and they received lower wages than men.
  • 1920's Economy: Increased Productivity

    1920's Economy: Increased Productivity
    Manufacturing processes and assembly lines were made faster thus increasing wealth and productivity.
  • 1920's Economy: Government Policy

    1920's Economy: Government Policy
    Governments offered corporate tax cuts and didn't enforce antitrust laws. Led to unequal income and speculation in markets.
  • 1920's Economy: Farm Problems

    1920's Economy: Farm Problems
    Farmers were left in debt after the war. Chemical fertilizers and gasoline tractors did increase production, however.
  • 1920's Economy: Labor Economy

    1920's Economy: Labor Economy
    Unions and strike efforts failed. Capitalists practiced open shop and welfare capitalism.
  • 1920's African American Identity: W.E.B. Du Bois

    1920's African American Identity: W.E.B. Du Bois
    Expressed Black nationalism and intellectualism but not back-to-Africa sentiment.
  • 1920's Literature: The Literature of Alienation

    1920's Literature: The Literature of Alienation
    Scorning religion as hypocritical and bitterly condemning the sacrifices of wartime as a fraud perpetuated by money interests were the two dominant themes at this time.
  • 1920's Literature: Sinclair Lewis

    1920's Literature: Sinclair Lewis
    Wrote about the mindless conformity of middle-class American society in the age of affluence.
  • 1920's Literature: Ezra Pound

    1920's Literature: Ezra Pound
    Defined the modern aesthetic that we see today in poetry.
  • Immigration: Quota Laws

    Immigration: Quota Laws
    Nativists convinced Congress to pass quota laws (1921 and 1924) to limit Asians and southern/eastern Europeans. Japanese were barred.
  • Immigration: Case of Sacco and Vanzetti

    Immigration: Case of Sacco and Vanzetti
    Nativists committed two Italian immigrants of murder, which liberal Americans believed was due to their poor Italian heritage. They were eventually executed.
  • Politics: Election of 1924

    Politics: Election of 1924
    (R) Calvin Coolidge defeated (D) John Davis. Coolidge supported limited government and private businesses.
  • 1920's Literature: Ernest Hemingway

    1920's Literature: Ernest Hemingway
    Wrote about the harshness of war and the time he spent overseas.
  • 1920's Literature: F. Scott Fitzgerald

    1920's Literature: F. Scott Fitzgerald
    Wrote The Great Gatsby, a book that captured a moral vacuity of postwar America, a society obsessed with wealth and status.
  • 1920's African American Identity: Poets and Musicians

    1920's African American Identity: Poets and Musicians
    Black poets like Langston Hughes and Claude McKay wrote about African-American heritage, while Black jazz musicians like Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong did the same thing.
  • Stock Market Crash: Black Thursday and Black Tuesday

    Stock Market Crash: Black Thursday and Black Tuesday
    An unprecedented volume of selling took place on Wall Street that led to the plunge of stock prices.
  • Stock Market Crash: Speculation

    Stock Market Crash: Speculation
    Buying on margin allowed people to borrow most of the cost of stock; this is one of the contributing factors of the crash.
  • Herbert Hoover's Policies: Hawley-Smoot Tariff

    Herbert Hoover's Policies: Hawley-Smoot Tariff
    Set tax increase ranging from 31% to 49% on foreign imports.
  • Dust Bowl

    Dust Bowl
    Okie farmers traveled to California after poor farming practices and high winds blew away millions of tons of dried topsoil.
  • Herbert Hoover's Policies: Debt Moratorium

    Herbert Hoover's Policies: Debt Moratorium
    Dawes Plan for collecting war debts could no longer continue, so Hoover proposed a suspension (moratorium) on the payment of international debts. Britain and Germany accepted (France didn't).
  • Prohibition: 21st Amendment

    Prohibition: 21st Amendment
    Repealed the 18th Amendment. Passed to resolve criminal activity, growing public resentment, and economic problems caused by the Depression.
  • New Deal Programs: Beer-Wine Revenue Act

    New Deal Programs: Beer-Wine Revenue Act
    Legalized the sale of beer and wine to raise needed tax money.
  • Bank Holiday

    Bank Holiday
    Established a bank holiday on March 6, 1933, to restore confidence in solvent banks.
  • New Deal Programs: The Emergency Banking Relief Act

    New Deal Programs: The Emergency Banking Relief Act
    Authorized the government to examine the finances of banks closed during the bank holiday.
  • New Deal Programs: Glass-Steagall Act

    New Deal Programs: Glass-Steagall Act
    Increased regulation of banks and limited how banks could invest consumers' money.
  • New Deal Programs: The Homeowners Loan Corporation

    New Deal Programs: The Homeowners Loan Corporation
    Provided refinancing of small homes to prevent foreclosures.
  • New Deal Programs: The Farm Credit Administration

    New Deal Programs: The Farm Credit Administration
    Provided low-interest farm loans and mortgages to prevent foreclosures on the property of indebted farmers.
  • New Deal Programs: The Federal Emergency Relief Administration

    New Deal Programs: The Federal Emergency Relief Administration
    Offered grants of federal money to states and local governments.
  • New Deal Programs: The Public Works Administration

    New Deal Programs: The Public Works Administration
    Allotted money to state and local governments for building roads, bridges, dams, and other public works.
  • New Deal Programs: The Civilian Conservation Corps

    New Deal Programs: The Civilian Conservation Corps
    Employed young men on projects on federal lands.
  • New Deal Programs: The Tennessee Valley Authority

    New Deal Programs: The Tennessee Valley Authority
    Hired thousands of people to build dams, operate electric power plants, manufacture fertilizer, and control flooding and explosion in the Tennessee Valley.
  • New Deal Programs: Civil Works Administration

    New Deal Programs: Civil Works Administration
    Hired laborers for temporary construction projects.
  • New Deal Programs: The Security and Exchange Commission

    New Deal Programs: The Security and Exchange Commission
    Regulated the stock market and placed limits on speculative practices.
  • New Deal Programs: The Federal Housing Administration

    New Deal Programs: The Federal Housing Administration
    Insured bank loans for building new houses and repairing old ones.
  • New Deal Programs: Resettlement Administration

    New Deal Programs: Resettlement Administration
    Provided loans to sharecroppers, tenants, and small farmers.
  • Dust Bowl: Soil Conservation Service

    Dust Bowl: Soil Conservation Service
    Taught farmers to rotate crops, terrace fields, and plant trees to stop soil erosion and conserve water.