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APUSH Period 7- Part 3

By Nyota
  • Panic of 1893 (Stock Market Crash)

    Panic of 1893 (Stock Market Crash)
    "the stock market crashed as a result of overspeculation, and dozens of railroads went into bankruptcy as a result of overbuilding, and The depression continued for almost four years.
  • United Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) (1920’s African American Identity)

    United Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) (1920’s African American Identity)
    "In 1916, the United Negro Improvement Association
    (UNIA) was brought to Harlem from Jamaica by a charismatic immigrant, Marcus Garvey."
  • Domestic Policy- Warren Harding (1920's Politics)

    Domestic Policy- Warren Harding (1920's Politics)
    "He approved a reduction in the income tax, an increase in tariff rates under the Fordney-McCumber Tariff Act of 1922, and establishment of the Bureau of the Budget, with procedures for all government expenditures to be placed in a single budget for Congress to review and vote on."
  • Defying the Law (Prohibition)

    Defying the Law (Prohibition)
    "Rival groups of gangsters, including Chicago gang headed by Al Capone, fought for control of lucrative bootlegging trade.
  • Divorce (1920's culture)

    Divorce (1920's culture)
    "As a result of women's suffrage, state lawmakers were now forced
    to listen to feminists, who demanded changes in the divorce laws to permit women to escape abusive and incompatible husbands, leading to increased rate of divorce.
  • Education (1920's culture)

    Education (1920's culture)
    "Widespread belief in the value of education, together with
    economic prosperity, stimulated more state governments to enact compulsory school laws."
  • Poets and Musicians (1920’s Literature)

    Poets and Musicians (1920’s Literature)
    "The leading Harlem poets included Countee Cullen,
    Langston Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, and Claude McKay. Commenting on the African American heritage, their poems expressed a range of emotions, from bitterness and resentment to joy and hope."
  • Fundamentalism (1920's Religion)

    Fundamentalism (1920's Religion)
    "Protestant preachers in rural areas condemned the modernists
    and taught that every word in the Bible must be accepted as literally true, and a key point in fundamentalist doctrine was that creationism explained the origin of all life. Fundamentalists blamed the liberal views of modernists for causing a decline in morals."
  • Harlem Renaissance (1920's Literature)

    Harlem Renaissance (1920's Literature)
    "Harlem became famous in the 1920s for its concentration of talented actors, artists, musicians, and writers."
  • Edward Hopper (1920's literature)

    Edward Hopper (1920's literature)
    "Painters, such as Edward Hopper, were inspired by the architecture
    of American cities to explore loneliness and isolation of urban life."
  • George Gershwin (1920's literature)

    George Gershwin (1920's literature)
    "composer George Gershwin, the son of Russian-Jewish immigrants,
    blended jazz and classical music in his symphonic Rhapsody in Blue and the folk opera Porgy and Bess."
  • Jazz (1920’s African American Identity)

    Jazz (1920’s African American Identity)
    "African American jazz musicians such as Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong were so popular among people of all races that the 1920s is often called the Jazz Age."
  • Harlem (1920’s African American Identity)

    Harlem (1920’s African American Identity)
    "The largest African American community developed in the Harlem section of New York City."
  • Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, and Claude McKay (1920’s African American Identity)

    Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, and Claude McKay (1920’s African American Identity)
    Commenting on the African American heritage, their poems expressed a range of emotions, from bitterness and resentment to joy and hope."
  • 1920’s African American Identity

    1920’s African American Identity
    "Garvey established an organization for black separatism, economic
    self-sufficiency, and a back-to-Africa movement."
  • Farm Problems (1920’s Economy)

    Farm Problems (1920’s Economy)
    Farmers' "best years had been 1916-1918, when crop prices had been kept artificially high by (1) wartime demand in Europe and (2) the U.S. government's wartime policy of guaranteeing a minimum price for wheat and corn; when the war ended, so did farm
    prosperity ."
  • labor Problems (1920’s Economy)

    labor Problems (1920’s Economy)
    "Some companies also began to practice welfare capitalism-voluntarily offering their employees improved benefits and higher wages in order to reduce their interest in organizing unions."
  • Consumer Economy (1920’s Economy)

    Consumer Economy (1920’s Economy)
    "Advertising expanded as businesses found that consumers' demand for new products could be manipulated by appealing to their desires for status and popularity, and stores increased sales of the new appliances and automobiles by allowing customers to buy on credit.
  • Business Prosperity (1920’s Economy)

     Business Prosperity (1920’s Economy)
    "The business boom-led by a spectacular rise of 64 percent in manufacturing output between 1919 and 1929."
  • Presidency of Warren Harding (1920’s Politics)

    Presidency of Warren Harding (1920’s Politics)
    "Harding appointed Charles Evans Hughes to be secretary of state; Herbert Hoover to be secretary of commerce; and the Pittsburgh
    industrialist and millionaire Andrew Mellon to be secretary of the treasury, and when the Chief Justice's seat on the Supreme Court became vacant, Harding filled it by appointing former President William Howard Taft."
  • Business Doctrine (1920's Politics)

    Business Doctrine (1920's Politics)
    "The main idea of the Republican party was that the nation would benefit if business and the pursuit of profits took the lead in developing the economy."
  • The Jazz Age (1920's Culture)

    The Jazz Age (1920's Culture)
    Brought north by African American musicians, jazz became a symbol of the "new" and "modem" culture of the cities."
  • Women at Home (1920's culture)

    Women at Home (1920's culture)
    "The traditional separation of labor between men and
    women continued into the 1920s, and most middle-class women expected to spend their lives as homemakers and mothers."
  • Women in the Labor Force (1920's culture)

    Women in the Labor Force (1920's culture)
    "Participation of women in the workforce remained about the same as before the war, and employed women usually lived in the cities, were limited to certain categories of jobs as clerks, nurses, teachers, and domestics, and received lower wages than men. "
  • Modernism (Religion)

    Modernism (Religion)
    "A range of influences, including the changing role of women,
    the Social Gospel movement, and scientific knowledge, caused large numbers of Protestants to define their faith in new ways, and Modernists took a historical and critical view of certain passages in the Bible and believed they could accept Darwin's theory of evolution without abandoning their religious faith."
  • Quota Laws (Immigration)

    Quota Laws (Immigration)
    The first quota act of 1921 limited immigration to 3 percent of number of foreign-born persons from a given nation counted in the 1910 Census."
  • Case of Sacco and Vanzetti (Immigration)

    Case of Sacco and Vanzetti (Immigration)
    They rallied to the support two Italian immigrants, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, who had been convicted in a Massachusetts court of committing robbery and murder, and Liberals protested that the two men were innocent."
  • The Election of 1924 (1920’s Politics)

    The Election of 1924 (1920’s Politics)
    "Coolidge was the overwhelming choice of the Republican party as their presidential nominee in 1924, and The Democrats nominated John W. Davis, and tried to make an issue of the Teapot Dome scandal.
  • Dawes Plan (Stock market crash)

    Dawes Plan (Stock market crash)
    "The Dawes Plan established a cycle of payments flowing from
    the US to Germany and from Germany to the Allies.
  • Marcus Garvey (1920’s Literature)

    Marcus Garvey (1920’s Literature)
    "Garvey's sale of stock in the Black Star Steamship line led to federal charges of fraud, and in 1925, he was tried, convicted, and jailed."
  • Hoover, Smith, and the Election of 1928 (1920's Politics)

    Hoover, Smith, and the Election of 1928 (1920's Politics)
    "Coolidge declined to run for the presidency a second time, and the Republicans turned to Herbert Hoover."
  • Impact of the Automobile (1920’s Economy)

    Impact of the Automobile (1920’s Economy)
    "The enormous increase in automobile sales meant that,
    by the end of the decade, there was an average of nearly one car per American family. "
  • Dust Bowl

    Dust Bowl
    "As if farmers did not already have enough problems, a severe drought in the early 1930s ruined crops in the Great Plains and this region became a dust bowl, as poor farming practices coupled with high winds blew away millions of tons of dried topsoil."
  • Hawley-Smoot Tariff (1930) (Herbert Hoover’s Policies)

    Hawley-Smoot Tariff (1930) (Herbert Hoover’s Policies)
    "The Hawley-Smoot Tariff passed by the Republican Congress set tax increases ranging from 31 percent to 49 percent on foreign imports."
  • Debt Moratorium (Herbert Hoover’s Policies)

    Debt Moratorium (Herbert Hoover’s Policies)
    "Hoover therefore proposed a moratorium (suspension) on the
    payment of international debts."
  • The Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) (New Deal Programs)

    The Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) (New Deal Programs)
    "offered outright grants of federal money to states and local governments that were operating soup kitchens and other forms of relief for the jobless and homeless.
  • The Public Works Administration (PWA)

    The Public Works Administration (PWA)
    "directed by Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes, allotted money to state and local governments for building roads, bridges, dams, and other public works."
  • The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) (New Deal Programs)

    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) (New Deal Programs)
    "employed young men on projects on federal lands and paid their families small monthly sums."
  • The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) (New Deal Programs)

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) (New Deal Programs)
    "As a government corporation, it hired thousands of people in one of the nation's poorest regions, the Tennessee Valley, to build dams, operate electric power plants, control flooding and erosion, and manufacture fertilizer."
  • National Recovery Administration (NRA) (New Deal Programs)

    National Recovery Administration (NRA) (New Deal Programs)
    "NRA was an attempt to guarantee reasonable profits for business and fair wages and hours for labor;"NRA could help each industry (such as steel, oil, and paper) set codes for wages, hours of work, levels of production, and prices of finished goods."
  • Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA) (New Deal Programs)

    Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA) (New Deal Programs)
    "The Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA) encouraged farmers to reduce production (and thereby boost prices) by offering to pay government subsidies for every acre they plowed under."
  • Political Discord and Repeal (Prohibition)

    Political Discord and Repeal (Prohibition)
    In 1933, 21st Amendment repealing the Eighteenth was ratified, and millions celebrated the new year by toasting the end of Prohibition.
  • The Civil Works Administration (CWA) (New Deal Programs)

    The Civil Works Administration (CWA) (New Deal Programs)
    "This agency hired laborers for temporary construction projects sponsored by the federal government."
  • The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) (New Deal Programs)

    The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) (New Deal Programs)
    "created to regulate the stock market and to place strict limits on the kind of speculative practices that had led to the Wall Street crash in 1929."
  • The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) (New Deal Programs)

    The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) (New Deal Programs)
    "gave both the construction industry and homeowners a boost by insuring bank loans for building new houses and repairing old ones"
  • Works Progress Administration (WPA) (New Deal Programs)

    Works Progress Administration (WPA) (New Deal Programs)
    "WPA spent billions of dollars between 1935 and 1940 to provide people with jobs."
  • Resettlement Administration (RA) (New Deal Programs)

    Resettlement Administration (RA) (New Deal Programs)
    "Placed under the direction of one of the Brain Trust, Rexford Tugwell, the Resettlement Administration provided loans to sharecroppers, tenants, and small farmers and established federal
    camps where migrant workers could find decent housing."
  • National Labor Relations (Wagner) Act (New Deal Programs)

    National Labor Relations (Wagner) Act (New Deal Programs)
    "The Wagner Act guaranteed a worker's right to join a union and a union's right to bargain collectively and outlawed business practices that were unfair to labor
  • Responses to Dust Bowl

    Responses to Dust Bowl
    "In response to one of the worst ecological disasters in American history, government created Soil Conservation Service in 1935 to teach and subsidize plains farmers to rotate crops, terrace fields, use contour plowing, and plant trees to stop soil erosion and conserve water. "
  • Rural Electrification Administration (REA) (New Deal Programs)

    Rural Electrification Administration (REA) (New Deal Programs)
    "This new agency provided loans for electrical cooperatives to supply power in rural areas. "