Cover 3

Unit 7, Part 3 - (RT - GD - ND)

  • 1920's Culture (1)

    1920's Culture (1)
    The Volstead Act was the act that solidified the passing of the 18th amendment, which banned the sale and manufacture of alcohol in the U.S. This led to increased smuggling, economic backlash, and the loss of jobs.
  • 1920's Culture (2)

    1920's Culture (2)
    Speakeasies were a direct result of prohibition; they were secret bars that replaced saloons and were popular in cities.
  • Prohibition (1)

    Prohibition (1)
    The Volstead Act passed the 18th amendment which banned the manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages in the U.S. This officially started the time period known as Prohibition, which lasted from 1919 to 1930.
  • 1920's Economy (1)

    1920's Economy (1)
    The Bull Market was when stocks were selling for all time highs, and they were being sold for more than they were actually worth. (date may not be approximate)
  • 1920's Economy (3)

    1920's Economy (3)
    Trickle-Down Economics was an economic concept that basically said loaning money to banks and upper class citizens would then 'trickle down' the pyramid of economics to the lower classes. (date may not be approximate)
  • 1920's Culture (3)

    1920's Culture (3)
    Consumerism in the 1920's was a result of a dramatic increase in moneymaking advertising, and was characterized by use of credit, installment plan purchasing, mechanization and electrification. All of these contributed to the U.S.'s vulnerable debt structure. (date may not be approximate)
  • 1920's Culture (4)

    1920's Culture (4)
    The invention of the radio greatly influenced American culture in several ways; it allowed for more advertising by businesses, made brands, musicians and artists more popular and widely known, and also allowed for the spread of political ideas. (date may not be approximate)
  • 1920's Culture (5)

    1920's Culture (5)
    Jazz music originated mainly in New Orleans; it was a fusion of African and European music, and it was extremely popular, and had a huge effect on pop culture and music. The term "Jazz Age" was coined by F. Scott Fitzgerald. (date may not be approximate)
  • 1920's Literature

    1920's Literature
    The Lost Generation included authors such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Sinclair Lewis. They got their name because they criticized middle-class conformity and materialism. (date may not be approximate)
  • 1920's Literature (3)

    1920's Literature (3)
    Sinclair Lewis was most well known for being a satirical author, and some of his most well known works include, but are not limited to, Main Street and Babbitt
  • 1920's Literature (4)

    1920's Literature (4)
    The Harlem Renaissance saw many great African-American writers, such as Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, Josephine Baker, & John Weldon Johnson. They were known for writing about the unfair discrimination against blacks in America and black culture. (date may not be approximate)
  • 1920's Literature (5)

    1920's Literature (5)
    Ernest Hemingway's writings were written mainly about patriotic idealism and the disillusionment to American propaganda. Some of works include The Sun Also Rises, Farewell to Arms, and The Old Man And The Sea. (date may not be approximate)
  • 1920's African American Identity (1)

    1920's African American Identity (1)
    The Great Migration took place from around 1910 all the way through the 20's. It was when roughly 400,000 African-Americans migrated from the south to northern cities and got industrial jobs. this created a whole new culture of black people, one that was much less prone to discrimination than they would've been in the south. (date may not be approximate)
  • 1920’s African American Identity (3)

    1920’s African American Identity (3)
    Jelly Roll Morton was a famous African-American pianist who was famous for bringing together the piano styles of ragtime and jazz, and he was the first major jazz composer. (date may not be approximate)
  • Religion (2)

    Religion (2)
    Fundamentalism was a set of beliefs that involved traditional Christian ideas about Jesus, and also the belief that the Bible was inspired by God and that everything in it was absolutely true. (date may not be approximate)
  • 1920's Politics (1)

    1920's Politics (1)
    The Teapot Dome Scandal happened when Secretary of Interior Albert Fall convinced Secretary of Navy to transfer naval oil reserves at Teapot Dome and Elks Hills to the Interior Department. Harding signed the order, and Fall then leased the lands to oilmen Harry Sinclair and Edward Doheny for a bribe of $100,000.
  • 1920's Politics (2)

    1920's Politics (2)
    Calvin Coolidge was the 30th president of the U.S., and was sworn in after the death of Warren G. Harding. He was a conservative who possessed laissez faire ideology, favored restrictions on immigration, and passed legislation such as the Revenue Act of 1924 and the Kellogg-Brian Pact.
  • 1920's Politics (4)

    1920's Politics (4)
    Charlie Forbes was the colonel head of the Veterans Bureau, who stole $200 million from the government in 1923, mainly in connection with the building of Veterans' Hospitals.
  • 1920’s African American Identity (2)

    1920’s African American Identity (2)
    The Cotton Club was a famous speakeasy in Harlem where blacks could perform but couldn't be part of the audience. Two famous leaders of the band were Duke Ellington and Cab Calloway.
  • 1920's Politics (5)

    1920's Politics (5)
    The Dawes Plan was a plan to revive the German economy after World War 1; the United States loaned Germany money which they then could use to pay reparations to England and France, who would then pay back their loans from the U.S. The plan ultimately worked.
  • Immigration (1)

    Immigration (1)
    The Immigration Quota Act aimed to keep America's existing racial composition which was largely Northern European. It also prevented Japanese immigration which led to hostilities from Japan.
  • Immigration (1)

    Immigration (1)
    The Immigration Quota Act cut quotas for foreigners from 3 % to 2% of the total number of immigrants. The purpose of the act was to keep America's existing racial composition which was largely Northern European (white). In addition to this, it prevented Japanese immigration which led to anger and tension between the U.S. and Japan.
  • Immigration (2)

    Immigration (2)
    The National Origins Act was a discriminatory immigration law that barred the immigration of Southern and Eastern Europeans and discluded Asians and other nonwhites from entry into the U.S.
  • 1920's Literature (2)

    1920's Literature (2)
    The Great Gatsby was written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, and involves themes such as the American Dream, different societal and economic classes in the U.S., and materialism, especially in the upper classes.
  • Religion (1)

    Religion (1)
    The Scopes Trial was a result of Tennessee science teacher, Jonathan Scopes, teaching evolution in public, which was a violation of state law (Darwin's theory of evolution was banned from being taught due to heavy religious influence in schools). Scopes lost the trial and was fired as a result.
  • 1920’s African American Identity (5)

    1920’s African American Identity (5)
    "The Jazz Singer" was a movie made in 1927 that ended the long era of silent films. The sound was recorded on a record and then the sound and picture were played at the same time.
  • 1920's Economy (2)

    1920's Economy (2)
    Black Tuesday occurred in 1929, when too many people had bad credit and were buying on the margin, and banks were failing across the country, as well as overproduction (mainly from farmers).
  • Prohibition (2)

    Prohibition (2)
    Al Capone was a gangster who caused large amounts of crime in Chicago during the time period of Prohibition. One of his most infamous crimes is the St. Valentine's Day Massacre, where he murdered seven unarmed rival gang members. (date is for St. Valentine's Day Massacre)
  • Stock Market Crash (1)

    Stock Market Crash (1)
    The stock market crashed in 1929, on the day known as "Black Tuesday," where stock prices plummeted because of debt and too many people buying on the margin.
  • 1920's Politics (3)

    1920's Politics (3)
    The Hawley-Smoot Tariff of 1930 was a tariff that granted moderate protection to farmers, and special interest limitations made it the highest peacetime tariff; it also did things like widen the trade gap, destroyed progress made in internationally lower tariffs, and fueled international depression as other nations imitated the US.
  • Herbert Hoover's Policies (1)

    Herbert Hoover's Policies (1)
    Hoover was big on tariffs on imported goods, as was evident with the Hawley-Smoot Tariff. It raised rates on foreign products to 42%.
  • Herbert Hoover's Policies (2)

    Herbert Hoover's Policies (2)
    "Trickle-Down" Economics was Hoover's economic policy that basically said if the rich get richer, their investments will lead to the expansion of business, and some of that money will trickle down to the people in the form of jobs and salaries. Hoover, it didn't work out like this; rather, it just made the rich richer and the poor poorer.
    (date may not be approximate)
  • Dust Bowl (1)

    Dust Bowl (1)
    The Dust Bowl happened when certain parts of Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas experienced high wind that blew around dry topsoil and dirt, as well as blew away their crops in giant dust storms.
  • 1920's Economy (4)

    1920's Economy (4)
    The Bonus Army was a group of World War 1 veterans that marched to Washington, D.C. in 1932 to demand the immediate payment of their government war bonuses in cash.
  • 1920's Economy (5)

    1920's Economy (5)
    The Reconstruction Finance Corporation was made to provide indirect relief by assisting insurance companies, banks, agricultural organizations, and railroads.
  • New Deal Programs (3)

    New Deal Programs (3)
    The Home Owners Loan Corporation, or HOLC, made it so the gov't could buy mortgages from banks, and it allowed borrowers to pay mortgages over longer periods of time and lower rates.
  • New Deal Programs (1)

    New Deal Programs (1)
    The Emergency Banking Act was put into place in 1933, and it enacted a Bank Holiday, which basically meant that all banks were closed and only the U.S. Treasury Department could decide which ones could be opened.
  • New Deal Programs (3)

    New Deal Programs (3)
    The Home Owners Loan Corporation, or HOLC, gave the government the ability to buy mortgages from banks, and it allowed borrowers to pay mortgages over longer periods of time and at a lower rate, too.
  • New Deal Programs (5)

    New Deal Programs (5)
    The Agricultural Adjustment Act, or AAA, paid farmers to grow less crops, which would reduce the supply and subsequently raise the price to generate more revenue.
  • New Deal Programs (6)

    New Deal Programs (6)
    The Civilian Conservation Corps, or CCC, hired young men and boys to work in camps cleaning up the environment along with National Parks.
  • New Deal Programs (7)

    New Deal Programs (7)
    The Tennessee Valley Authority, or TVA, was a public works projects which took place in the Tennessee Valley area; people were building dams and hydroelectric power stations run by the government.
  • New Deal Programs (9)

    New Deal Programs (9)
    The Civil Works Administration, or CWA, was put in place to employ staff to run municipal facilities.
  • New Deal Programs (11)

    New Deal Programs (11)
    The National Labor Relations Board, or NLRB, made unions legal, as well as made strikes legal, and it served as a government mediator to settle labor disputes.
  • New Deal Programs (12)

    New Deal Programs (12)
    The Social Security Act provided benefits to retired and unemployed people, and was paid for by an added payroll tax on current workers.
  • New Deal Programs (8)

    New Deal Programs (8)
    The Public Works Administration , or PWA, involved public works to build municipal facilities, such as a town hall, fire and police stations, library, and schools.
  • New Deal Programs (10)

    New Deal Programs (10)
    The Works Progress Administration, or WPA, provided people with almost any job imaginable, and they had a reputation for waste, corruption, and laziness.
  • Stock Market Crash (2)

    Stock Market Crash (2)
    The New Deal Program happened under the F.D.R. administration, and the programs were meant to combat economic depression; it enacted several social insurance measures and used government spending to stimulate the economy.
  • Dust Bowl (2)

    Dust Bowl (2)
    The dust storms in the Dust Bowl caused a sever drought in the Great Plains area, and with the storms already blowing away crops, there was a massive impact on the agricultural industry, which only helped in prolonging the end of the Great Depression.
  • New Deal Programs (1)

    New Deal Programs (1)
    The Emergency Banking Act put into place a Bank Holiday, in which all banks were closed, and the U.S. Treasury Department would decide which ones were opened.
  • New Deal Programs (2)

    New Deal Programs (2)
    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, or FDIC, was put into place with the passage of the Glass-Steagall Act; it ensured that your deposits would be repayed even if your bank fails, and it forbade banks from using deposits to invest in stocks.
  • New Deal Programs (2)

    New Deal Programs (2)
    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, or FDIC, was put into place with the passage of the Glass-Seagall Act, and it ensured that your deposits would be repayed even if your bank failed, as well as forbade banks from using deposits to invest in stocks.
  • New Deal Programs (13)

    New Deal Programs (13)
    The Indian Reorganization Act ended the Dawes Act, which made division of tribal lands, it said tribes could self govern, and it provided money for education and tribal art.
  • New Deal Programs (4)

    New Deal Programs (4)
    The Security and Exchange Commission, or SEC, was put into place to monitor activities on Wall St. and to look out for illegal trading.
  • 1920’s African American Identity (4)

    1920’s African American Identity (4)
    A. Philip Randolph was the U.S.'s leading black labor leader who called for a march on Washington D.C. to protest factories' refusals to hire African Americans. This resulted in President Roosevelt ordering businesses/ factories to end all discrimination in the defense industries.