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APUSH Period 7 (Part 3)

  • W.E.B De Bois "The Souls of Black Folk" (1920s African American Identity)

    W.E.B De Bois "The Souls of Black Folk" (1920s African American Identity)
    The Souls of Black Folk is a work of American literature by W. E. B. Du Bois. It is a seminal work in the history of sociology, and a cornerstone of African-American literature. The book contains several essays on race, some of which the magazine Atlantic Monthly had previously published.
  • UNIA founded (1920s African American Identity)

    UNIA founded (1920s African American Identity)
    The Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League is a black nationalist fraternal organization founded in 1914 in the United States by Marcus Mosiah Garvey, a Jamaican immigrant.
  • Volstead Act (Prohibition)

    Volstead Act (Prohibition)
    The National Prohibition Act, known informally as the Volstead Act, was enacted to carry out the intent of the 18th Amendment, which established prohibition in the United States.
  • Election of 1920 (1920's Politics)

    Election of 1920 (1920's Politics)
    While Harding was serving in the Senate, the Republican party nominated him as their presidential candidate for the election of 1920. Harding's campaign promised a return to "normalcy," rejecting the activism of Theodore Roosevelt and the idealism of Woodrow Wilson.
  • "Lost Generation" began (1920s culture)

    "Lost Generation" began (1920s culture)
    The phrase "Lost Generation," as coined by Gertrude Stein, refers specifically to ex-patriot writers who left the United States to take part in the literary culture of cities such as Paris and London during the 1920s.
  • Fordism (1920s Culture)

    Fordism (1920s Culture)
    Fordism is a term widely used to describe (1) the system of mass production that was pioneered in the early 20th century by the Ford Motor Company or (2) the typical postwar mode of economic growth and its associated political and social order in advanced capitalism.
  • First Commercial Radio Station (1920s Culture)

    First Commercial Radio Station (1920s Culture)
    The first broadcast of commercial radio set communication technology into motion, with NBC and CBS developing later on.
  • Harlem Renaissance (1920s African American Identity)

    Harlem Renaissance (1920s African American Identity)
    The Harlem Renaissance was an intellectual, social, and artistic explosion centered in Harlem, New York, spanning the 1920s. During the time, it was known as the "New Negro Movement", named after The New Negro.
  • Fundamentalism (Religion)

    Fundamentalism (Religion)
    A form of a religion, especially Islam or Protestant Christianity, that upholds belief in the strict, literal interpretation of scripture.
  • Modernism (Religion)

    Modernism (Religion)
    Modernism is a philosophical movement that, along with cultural trends and changes, arose from wide-scale and far-reaching transformations in Western society during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • Sacco and Vanzetti Robbery (Immigration)

    Sacco and Vanzetti Robbery (Immigration)
    Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were Italian-born American anarchists who were controversially convicted of murdering a guard and a paymaster during the April 15, 1920 armed robbery of the Slater and Morrill Shoe Company in Braintree, Massachusetts, United States.
  • Teapot Dome Scandal (1920s Politics)

    Teapot Dome Scandal (1920s Politics)
    The Teapot Dome scandal was a bribery scandal involving the administration of United States President Warren G. Harding from 1921 to 1923.
  • Nine-Power Treaty (1920s Economic)

    Nine-Power Treaty (1920s Economic)
    The Nine-Power Treaty or Nine Power Agreement was a treaty affirming the sovereignty and territorial integrity of China as per the Open Door Policy.
  • Fordney- McCumber Tariff Law (1920s Economics)

    Fordney- McCumber Tariff Law (1920s Economics)
    The Fordney–McCumber Tariff was a law that raised American tariffs on many imported goods to protect factories and farms. The US Congress displayed a pro-business attitude in passing the tariff and in promoting foreign trade by providing huge loans to Europe.
  • Adkins v. Children's Hospital (1920s Economy)

    Adkins v. Children's Hospital (1920s Economy)
    Adkins v. Children's Hospital is a United States Supreme Court opinion that federal minimum wage legislation for women was an unconstitutional infringement of liberty of contract, as protected by the due process clause of the Fifth Amendment. Adkins was overturned in West Coast Hotel Co. v. Parrish.
  • Duke Ellington Orchestra (1920s African American Identity)

    Duke Ellington Orchestra (1920s African American Identity)
    Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington was an American composer, pianist, and leader of a jazz orchestra, which he led from 1923 until his death over a career spanning more than fifty years.
  • Election of 1924 (1920's Politics)

    Election of 1924 (1920's Politics)
    The United States presidential election of 1924 was the 35th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 4, 1924. In a three-way contest, incumbent Republican President Calvin Coolidge won election to a full term.
  • McNary-Haugen Bill (1920s Economy)

    McNary-Haugen Bill (1920s Economy)
    The McNary–Haugen Farm Relief Act, which never became law, was a controversial plan in the 1920s to subsidize American agriculture by raising the domestic prices of farm products. The plan was for the government to buy the wheat and then store it or export it at a loss.
  • Immigration Act of 1924 (Immigration)

    Immigration Act of 1924 (Immigration)
    The Immigration Act of 1924 limited the number of immigrants allowed entry into the United States through a national origins quota. The quota provided immigration visas to two percent of the total number of people of each nationality in the United States as of the 1890 national census.
  • An American Tragedy Published (1920s Literature)

    An American Tragedy Published (1920s Literature)
    The title "An American Tragedy" is a play on the expression "the American dream." That dream is supposedly to rise from rags to riches, or at least to do better than our parents did before us.
  • The Weary Blues Published (1920s Literature)

    The Weary Blues Published (1920s Literature)
    "The Weary Blues" is a poem by American poet Langston Hughes. Written in 1925, "The Weary Blues" was first published in the Urban League magazine, Opportunity. It was awarded the magazine's prize for best poem of the year.
  • Garvey Jailed (1920s African American Identity)

    Garvey Jailed (1920s African American Identity)
    Garvey established an organization for black separatism, economic self-sufficiency, and a back-to-Africa movement. Garvey's sale of stock in the Black Star Steamship line led to federal charges of fraud. In 1925, he was tried, convicted, and jailed. Later, he was deported to Jamaica and his movement collapsed.
  • NBC created (1920s Culture)

    NBC created (1920s Culture)
    The new radio station was able to connect the country through radio broadcasts of news shows, sports shows, and entertainment.
  • The Great Gatsby Published (1920s Literature)

    The Great Gatsby Published (1920s Literature)
    Cultural Impact of The Great Gatsby. F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, written in 1925, depicts a portion of Nick Carraway's life characterized by the time he is influenced by the mysterious Jay Gatsby and his extensive pursuit of his former flame and Nick's cousin, Daisy Buchanan.
  • The Sun also Rises Published (1920s Literature)

    The Sun also Rises Published (1920s Literature)
    The Sun Also Rises, a novel by American Ernest Hemingway, portrays American and British expatriates who travel from Paris to the Festival of San Fermín in Pamplona to watch the running of the bulls and the bullfights. An early and enduring modernist novel, it received mixed reviews upon publication.
  • Soil Conservation Service (Dust Bowl)

    Soil Conservation Service (Dust Bowl)
    The Soil Conservation and Domestic Allotment Act Pub.L. 74–461, enacted February 29, 1936) is a United States federal law that allowed the government to pay farmers to reduce production so as to conserve soil and prevent erosion.
  • CBS created (1920s Culture)

    CBS created (1920s Culture)
    CBS was another new radio network that connected the country with news broadcasts and entertainment.
  • Election of 1928 (1920s Politics)

    Election of 1928 (1920s Politics)
    The United States presidential election of 1928 was the 36th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 6, 1928. Republican Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover defeated the Democratic nominee, Governor Al Smith of New York.
  • Kellogg-Briand Pact (1920s Politics)

    Kellogg-Briand Pact (1920s Politics)
    The Kellogg–Briand Pact is an international agreement in which signatory states promised not to use war to resolve "disputes or conflicts of whatever nature or of whatever origin they may be, which may arise among them".
  • Agricultural Marketing Act (1920s Economy)

    Agricultural Marketing Act (1920s Economy)
    The Agricultural Marketing Act, under the administration of Herbert Hoover, established the Federal Farm Board from the Federal Farm Loan Board established by the Federal Farm Loan Act of 1916 with a revolving fund of half a billion dollars.
  • A Farewell to Arms Published (1920s Literature)

    A Farewell to Arms Published (1920s Literature)
    A Farewell to Arms is a novel by Ernest Hemingway set during the Italian campaign of World War I. It is a first-person account of an American, Frederic Henry, serving as a lieutenant in the ambulance corps of the Italian Army.
  • Black Thursday (Stock Market Crash)

    Black Thursday (Stock Market Crash)
    Black Thursday refers to October 24, 1929, when panicked sellers traded nearly 13 million shares on the New York Stock Exchange (more than three times the normal volume at the time), and investors suffered $5 billion in losses.
  • Black Tuesday (Stock Market Crash)

    Black Tuesday (Stock Market Crash)
    On this date, share prices on the New York Stock Exchange completely collapsed, becoming a pivotal factor in the emergence of the Great Depression.
  • Federal Farm Board (Hoover Policies)

    Federal Farm Board (Hoover Policies)
    The Federal Farm Board was established by the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1929 from the Federal Farm Loan Board established by the Federal Farm Loan Act of 1916, with a revolving fund of half a billion dollars to stabilize prices and to promote the sale of agricultural products.
  • Hawley-Smoot Tariff (Hoover Policies)

    Hawley-Smoot Tariff (Hoover Policies)
    The Tariff Act of 1930, commonly known as the Smoot–Hawley Tariff or Hawley–Smoot Tariff, was an Act implementing protectionist trade policies sponsored by Senator Reed Smoot and Representative Willis C. Hawley and was signed into law on June 17, 1930. The act raised U.S. tariffs on over 20,000 imported goods.
  • 18th Amendment repealed (Prohibition)

    18th Amendment repealed (Prohibition)
    The 21st Amendment to the Constitution was passed and ratified, ending national Prohibition. After the repeal of the 18th Amendment, some states continued Prohibition by maintaining statewide temperance laws.
  • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (New Deal Programs)

    Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (New Deal Programs)
    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation is a United States government corporation providing deposit insurance to depositors in U.S. commercial banks and savings institutions. The FDIC was created by the 1933 Banking Act, enacted during the Great Depression to restore trust in the American banking system.
  • Home Owners Loan Corporation (New Deal Programs)

    Home Owners Loan Corporation (New Deal Programs)
    The Home Owners' Loan Corporation was a government-sponsored corporation created as part of the New Deal. The corporation was established in 1933 by the Home Owners' Loan Corporation Act under the leadership of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • Federal Emergency Relief Administration (New Deal Programs)

    Federal Emergency Relief Administration (New Deal Programs)
    The Federal Emergency Relief Administration was the new name given by the Roosevelt Administration to the Emergency Relief Administration which President Franklin Delano Roosevelt had created in 1933.
  • Public Works Administration (New Deal Programs)

    Public Works Administration (New Deal Programs)
    Public Works Administration (PWA), part of the New Deal of 1933, was a large-scale public works construction agency in the United States headed by Secretary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes. It was created by the National Industrial Recovery Act in June 1933 in response to the Great Depression.
  • Civilian Conservation Corps (New Deal Programs)

    Civilian Conservation Corps (New Deal Programs)
    The Civilian Conservation Corps was a public work relief program that operated from 1933 to 1942 in the United States for unemployed, unmarried men. Originally for young men ages 18–25, it was eventually expanded to ages 17–28.
  • Tennessee Valley Authority (New Deal Programs)

    Tennessee Valley Authority (New Deal Programs)
    The Tennessee Valley Authority is a federally owned corporation in the United States created by congressional charter on May 18, 1933, to provide navigation, flood control, and electricity generation.
  • Emergency Banking Relief Act (New Deal Programs)

    Emergency Banking Relief Act (New Deal Programs)
    The Emergency Banking Act of 1933 was a bill passed during the administration of U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt in reaction to the financially adverse conditions of the Great Depression. ... The act was passed during this shutdown, in hopes that Americans would renew their confidence by the time the banks re-opened.
  • Securities and Exchange Commission (New Deal Programs)

    Securities and Exchange Commission (New Deal Programs)
    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is an independent federal government agency responsible for protecting investors, maintaining fair and orderly functioning of the securities markets, and facilitating capital formation.
  • Federal Housing Administration

    Federal Housing Administration
    The Federal Housing Administration is a United States government agency created in part by the National Housing Act of 1934. The FHA sets standards for construction and underwriting and insures loans made by banks and other private lenders for home building.
  • Works Progress Administration (New Deal Programs)

    Works Progress Administration (New Deal Programs)
    The Works Progress Administration was an American New Deal agency, employing millions of people to carry out public works projects, including the construction of public buildings and roads. It was established on May 6, 1935, by Executive Order 7034.
  • Resettlement Administration (New Deal Programs)

    Resettlement Administration (New Deal Programs)
    The Resettlement Administration (RA) was a New Deal U.S. federal agency created May 1, 1935. It relocated struggling urban and rural families to communities planned by the federal government.
  • Rural Electrification Administration (New Deal Programs)

    Rural Electrification Administration (New Deal Programs)
    The Rural Electrification Act of 1936, enacted on May 20, 1936, provided federal loans for the installation of electrical distribution systems to serve isolated rural areas of the United States. The funding was channeled through cooperative electric power companies, most of which still exist today.
  • The Grapes of Wrath (Dust Bowl)

    The Grapes of Wrath (Dust Bowl)
    The Dust Bowl was a series of severe dust storms that plagued the Midwest throughout the second half of the 1930s, killing off crops and livestock, burying homes, and wreaking havoc on the agriculture industry. The Dust Bowl, also called the ''Dirty Thirties,'' was the setting for John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath.
  • Civil Works Administration (New Deal Programs)

    Civil Works Administration (New Deal Programs)
    Communications Workers of America is the largest communications and media labor union in the United States, representing about 700,000 members in both the private and public sectors. The union has 27 locals in Canada via CWA-SCA Canada representing about 8,000 members.