Farley's road to revolution project

Timeline created by Farley307
In History
  • The French And Indian War

    The French And Indian War
    The French & Indian war also referred to as the 7 year war which was January 1st 1754- 1763. The British and the French were fighting over the Ohio river valley, a great transportation & trade place, French had it and the British wanted it. In early battles before the war, the French were winning. The Indians saw this and started to side with French. In 1756 the British formally declared war. In July of 1758 the British got their first great victory at Louisburg, near the mouth of the St. Lawren
  • The French & Indian war part 2

    The French & Indian war part 2
    great victory at Louisburg, near the mouth of the St. Lawrence river. A month later the British took fort Frontenac, by the western end of the river. After that they then closed in on Quebec. With the fall of Montreal in September 1760, French lost their last foothold in Canada. The British won the war in the end, the British ended up concurring French Canada, India, captured French island colonies in the Caribbean. Although a successful win the for the British they were left a horrible war debt
  • Treaty of Paris

    Treaty of Paris
    The Treaty of Paris also known as the Peace of Paris, was signed February 10th 1763.This document officially ended the French and Indian war. It also got rid of Frances power in North America. France had to give up its land in North America. The colonist didn’t have to worry about the French, they could venture out more and do what they pleased with the land. The British got Quebec and the Ohio River Valley
  • Treaty of Paris part 2

    Treaty of Paris part 2
    the land. the British got Quebec and the Ohio River Valley
  • Pontiac's War

    Pontiac's War
    Pontiac’s war was named after the man who started it all, the leader of the Owatta nation, Pontiac. After the French and Indian war he formed an alliance with the western native Americans. His plan was that each tribe would attack the closest fort, then they would all join as one to wipe out the unbeaten and successful settlements. In May of 1763 Pontiac and his allies attacked British forts & settlements. They destroyed nearly half a dozen western British forts, and at least 2000 backcountry se
  • Pontiac's War part 2

    Pontiac's War part 2
    2000 backcountry setters were killed. British settlers came back with the same amount of violence. The British finally defeated Pontiac’s forces in early august at a battle near fort pitt. Pontiac continued to fight for another year, but by the fall of 1764, the war was over.
  • Proclamation of 1763

    Proclamation of 1763
    The Proclamation of 1763 was a document in an attempt to prevent the colonists from settling west, passed the Appalachian Mountains. The British made this law to prevent future issues between the Native Americans and the colonists. The main reason for the law was because it was costing too much money for the British to keep fighting the Indians to keep them away from the settlers. This made the colonists really mad because they wanted the benefits and farming land of the western lands that they
  • Proclamation of 1763 part 2

    Proclamation of 1763 part 2
    had won in the French and Indian war. The imaginary boundary line was widely ignored by the colonist.
    It didn’t really have any affect because so many colonists were already settled in the area or didn’t care to follow the law
  • The Sugar Act

    The Sugar Act
    The Sugar Act is an act passed by the British Parliament in 1764. It put a three cent tax on sugar that was bought by the American colonists. The British did this as an attempt to pay off the war debt they had acuminated from the French and Indian war. They decided to tax the colonists in order to help get ride of the debt. This didn’t cause a big uproar, only because it didn’t effect many colonist.
  • The Stamp Act

    The Stamp Act
    The Stamp Act of 1765 was passed by the British Parliament and required all legal documents, permits, commercial contracts, newspapers, wills, pamphlets, playing cards ect. in the colonies to have a tax stamp. The Act was another attempt to get rid of the war debt. The colonists reacted immediately, they made petitions, boycotts and there were groups of angry colonist doing things like taunting tax collectors with puppets. They were also tarring and feathering tax collectors.
  • The Quatering Act

    The Quatering Act
    The Quartering Act in 1765 was an act, passed by the Parliament that forced colonists to accept British soldiers into their homes. The colonist were expected to shelter the British soldiers, feed them and take care of them. Resistance to the Quartering Act was strongest in New York. The New Yorkers stated that it was unfair for them to have to pay for necessities for the large and growing army. Others reacted by threatening the soldiers and by refusing to shelter, feed, and give them clothing
  • The Stamp Act Congress

    The Stamp Act Congress
    The Stamp Act Congress was a meeting in New York City in October 1765 with representatives from 9 of the 13 colonies that discussed and acted on the recently passed Stamp Act. During the meetings they made the Declaration of Rights and Grievances. That was a document written by the Stamp Act Congress, passed on October 19, 1765. It said that taxes forced on British colonists without their official approval were unconstitutional. Only six of the colonies agreed to write petitions to the King and
  • The Stamp Act Congress part 2

    The Stamp Act Congress part 2
    petitions to the King and both houses of Parliament. Some people say that this Congress is the first organized American action in the introduction to the American Revolution. The colonies that did not send representatives were Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia, and New Hampshire.
  • The Townshend Acts

    The Townshend Acts
    The Townshend acts were proposed to the Parliament by Chancellor of the Exchequer Charles Townshend in 1767. The acts forced tax on glass, lead, paints, paper, and tea imported into the colonies. Colonists reacted to this by boycotting goods, refusing to give British soldiers living necessities, and they agreed not to buy or import British goods. They also started to go to mob violence against the people who were with the government or people trying to carry out the acts.
  • The Boston Massacre

    The Boston Massacre
    The Boston Massacre was the killing of five colonists by British soldiers on March 5, 1770. It was the build up of tensions in the colonies that had been growing since British troops first showed up in Massachusetts on October 1768 to enforce the harsh tax made by the Townshend Acts. On the cold, snowy night, a mob of angry colonists gather at the Customs House in Boston and begin taunting the British soldiers who were guarding the building. The protesters, who called themselves Patriots, were p
  • The Boston Massacre part 2

    The Boston Massacre part 2
    guarding the building. The protesters, who called themselves Patriots, were protesting the British troops presents in their town. . The colonists responded by throwing snowballs and other objects at the British regulars. The colonists taunted the soldiers by throwing snowballs, ice and other objects at them. Some believe that the soldiers shot the first shot, others think it was the British, I think it was the colonist, but the shot was by accident. After the “massacre” the British soldiers we
  • The boston Massacre part 3

    The boston Massacre part 3
    accident. After the “massacre” the British soldiers were accused of murder and put on the death trial. John Adams defended them in court because in his opinion everyone had a right to a fair trial with a lawyer. In the end only 2 or the soldiers were accused of man slaughter and their punishment was getting an “M” branded on their thumbs. The way that the colonist portrayed the event was because of Paul Revere and his painting of what he claims to be as the massacre.
  • The Tea Act

    The Tea Act
    The Tea act was passed by the British Parliament in 1773 to reduce the tax on tea shipped to the colonies. The act's main purpose was to bail out the struggling East India Company. The British government gave the East Indian Company a monopoly on the import and sale of tea in the colonies.
  • The Boston Tea Party

    The Boston Tea Party
    In December 16, 1773, a group of Massachusetts Patriots, protesting the monopoly on tea importation into the American colonies recently given by the British Parliament to the East India Company, took over 342 chests of tea in at midnight on three tea ships and threw them into the harbor. That was known to be the Boston Tea Party
  • The Intolerable Acts

    The Intolerable Acts
    The Intolerable Acts were a punishment for the British colonist for the Boston Tea Party. The Boston Port Bill, closed Boston Harbor to everyone except British ships until the tea that was wasted at the Boston Tea Party was repaid. Then The Administration of Justice Act. British Officials could not be tried in colonial courts for crimes. They would be taken back to Britain and have their trials there. Massachusetts Government Act, The British Governor was in charge of Boston, and the colony had
  • The Intolerable Acts part 2

    The Intolerable Acts part 2
    Act, The British Governor was in charge of Boston, and the colony had no more self-government.
    The Quebec Act, the Canadian borders were off limits to the colonies of Connecticut, Massachusetts and Virginia.
  • The First Continental Congress

    The First Continental Congress
    The first Continental Congress met in Carpenter's Hall in Philadelphia, from September 5, to October 26, 1774 after the intolerable acts were introduced. All of the colonies except Georgia sent representatives, these were elected by the people. The first few weeks were spent in discussion and debate. The congress made and approved the first national constitution, the Articles of Confederation. The colonies had always, up to then, acted as independent colonies
  • Lexington and Concord

    Lexington and Concord
    The battles of Lexington and Concord were the start of the American Revolutionary War.
    About 700 British soldiers, under Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith, were given secret orders to take and destroy military supplies that were said to be stored by the Massachusetts militia at Concord. Through really good intelligence gathering, the Patriot colonials had got word weeks before the attack that their supplies might be at risk, and had moved most of them somewhere else. They also got details about B
  • Lexington and Concord part 2

    Lexington and Concord part 2
    of them somewhere else. They also got details about British plans the night before the battle, and were able to quickly let the area militias of the military know about this and act quickly. The first shots were fired early in the morning around sun rise at Lexington. The militia were realized outnumbered and fell back, and the British continued on to Concord, where they searched for the supplies. At the North Bridge in Concord hundreds of minutemen fought and defeated three sets of the British
  • Lexington and Concord part 3

    Lexington and Concord part 3
    hundreds of minutemen fought and defeated three sets of the British soldiers. This time the outnumbered British soldiers retreated from the minutemen after a battle in open territory. In the end the Americans had won the battle
  • The Second Continental Congress

    The Second Continental Congress
    The Congress met on May 10, 1776, in the State House in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    This second Congress had a few representatives that hadn't been at the first Continental Congress. Some of the people were new and some returning representatives included.Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, and the new president of the Continental Congress, John Hancock. The Congress included sixty-five delegates. At the congress, they decided to completely break away from Great Britain.
    Another thing they decid
  • the Second Continental Congress part 2

    the Second Continental Congress part 2
    -ed that they had to do was organize the militia for the colonies better. So they decided to form an army called the American Continental Army
  • Battle of Bunker Hill

    Battle of Bunker Hill
    On June 17, 1775, early in the Revolutionary War, the British defeated the Americans at the Battle of Bunker Hill in Massachusetts. Despite their loss, the inexperienced colonial forces inflicted great casualties against the enemy, and the battle provided Americans with an important confidence boost.