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American Independence Timeline

  • French & Indian War Began

    French & Indian War Began
    The French and Indian War was fought between Great Britain and its two enemies, the French and the Indians of North America. Most of the battles were in Canada. American colonists, including George Washington, fought with the British in this war, which lasted from 1754 to 1763. The British won the war and won the right to keep Canada and several other possessions in the New World, but they also left with debt.
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    French & Indian War

    The French and Indian War was fought between Great Britain and its two enemies, the French and the Indians of North America. Most of the battles were in Canada. American colonists, including George Washington, fought with the British in this war, which lasted from 1754 to 1763. The British won the war and won the right to keep Canada and several other possessions in the New World, but they left with debt.
  • Proclamation of 1763

    Proclamation of 1763
    Proclamation by Britain at the end of the French and Indian War that prohibited settlement by whites on Indian territory. They could travel no farther West from the line that the king drew. It formalized Indian land titles.
  • Sugar Act

    Sugar Act
    1764 Act that put a three-cent tax on foreign refined sugar and increased taxes on coffee, indigo, and certain kinds of wine. It banned importation of rum and French wines. These taxes affected only a certain part of the population, but the affected merchants were very vocal. Besides, the taxes were raised without the consent of the colonists. This was one of the first instances in which colonists wanted a say in how much they were taxed.
  • Sons of Liberty

    Sons of Liberty
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    Stamp Act

  • Stamp Act Began

    Stamp Act Began
    First direct British tax on American colonists. Every newspaper, pamphlet, and other public and legal document had to have a Stamp, or British seal, on it. The Stamp, of course, costed money. The colonists didn't think they should have to pay for something they had been doing for free for many years, and they responded in force! It eventually got repealed.
  • Declaratory Act

    Declaratory Act
    Declaration by the British Parliament that accompanied repeal of the Stamp Act. It stated that Parliament's authority was the same in America as in Britain and asserted Parliament's authority to make laws binding on the American colonies. They had total control.
  • First Quartering Act

  • Boston Massacre

    Boston Massacre
    Shooting of five American colonists by British troops. One person, an African-American man named Crispus Attacks, was killed. The British say rocks and other such weapons were hurled at them. But the British had guns, and they did open fire. The Boston Massacre deepened American distrust of the British military presence in the colonies. The incident was widely publicized by Sammuel Adams.
  • Boston Tea Party

    Boston Tea Party
    Angry and frustrated at a new tax on tea, American colonists calling themselves the Sons of Liberty and disguised as Mohawk Native Americans boarded three British ships (the Dartmouth, the Eleanor, and the Beaver) and dumped 342 crates of British tea into Boston harbor on December 16, 1773. Tea was eventually boycotted throughout the colonies.
  • Second Quartering Act

    Second Quartering Act
  • Coercive Act

    Coercive Act
    The Intolerable Acts were laws that were really punishments that King George III put on the colonies. He did this to the Colonists because he wanted to punish them for dumping tea into the harbor at the Boston Tea Party. The Quakers petitioned King George to repeal or end the acts, but he said that the colonies must submit to these English laws.
  • Intolerable Acts

    Intolerable Acts
    The Intolerable Acts were laws that were really punishments that King George III put on the colonies. He did this to the Colonists because he wanted to punish them for dumping tea into the harbor at the Boston Tea Party. The Quakers petitioned King George to repeal or end the acts, but he said that the colonies must submit to these English laws.
  • First Continental Congress

    First Continental Congress
  • Lexington & Concord

    Lexington & Concord
    First shots fired between American and British troops (known as The Shot Heard Around the World). The British chose to march to Concord because the Americans had stockpiled weapons there. Both sides opened fire, and the Americans were forced to withdraw. But they had slowed the British advance. The weapons depot was saved, and the British were forced to retreat.
  • Second Continental Congress

    Second Continental Congress
  • Townshend Acts

    Townshend Acts
  • Decleration of Independence

    Decleration of Independence
  • Ratification of the Articles of Confederation

    Ratification of the Articles of Confederation
  • Shay's Rebellion Began

    Shay's Rebellion Began
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    Shay's Rebellion