History of Television

By lolrawr
  • First still picture.

    First still picture.
    A still picture was transmitted through a wire.
    Moving images were not successfully sent for another 65 years!
  • Canadian radio began

    Canadian radio began
    Canadian radio began with the first licences for private commercial radio stations in 1922. However by the late 1920s, many Canadian radio listeners were tuning their dials to American stations. This, along with the rudimentary development of Canadian radio, led the federal government, in 1928, to establish a royal commission to advise on the future of broadcasting in Canada.
  • First national broadcast.

  • 200 TV sets in the U.S.

    200 TV sets in the U.S.
  • CRBC with a Crown Corporation.

    The Canadian Broadcasting Act replaced the CRBC with a Crown Corporation, and Canada's national public broadcaster was born.
  • Broadcasted the first televised Presidential speech.

    The Radio Corporation of America (RCA) broadcast the first televised Presidential speech, delivered by F.D. Roosevelt.
  • Radio-Canada's CBF station began broadcasting.

    Radio-Canada's CBF station began broadcasting the program Le réveil rural, a show dedicated to economic information intended for rural inhabitants.
  • CBC began"farm broadcasts".

  • With the declaration of World War II.

    With the declaration of World War II, CBC/Radio-Canada sent a team of announcers and technicians to accompany the Canadian Armed Forces' First Division to England, and so began special wartime broadcasts.
  • The national public broadcaster adopted its first emblem.

    The national public broadcaster adopted its first emblem.
  • The basic national radio network was renamed the Trans-Canada Network.

    The basic national radio network was renamed the Trans-Canada Network and the Dominion Network was also formed, linking CJBC Toronto with 34 private stations to offer an alternative lighter service.
  • The official opening of CBC/Radio-Canada's International Service.

  • Creation of the radio station Radio Saint-Boniface, in Manitoba.

    Creation of the radio station Radio Saint-Boniface, in Manitoba, provided the first French language network station outside of the Province of Québec.
  • 1 million TV sets in the U.S.

    1 million TV sets in the U.S.
    1 million TV sets in the U.S. and Community Antenna Television was introduced in mountainous rural areas of Pennsylvania. This became what we now know as cable TV.
  • Television was mostly “live” programs.

    Television was mostly “live” programs.
    Television was mostly “live” as programs were broadcast as they were being performed. Programs recorded onto film were very poor quality.
  • The first issue of the weekly program guide CBC Times was published.

    The first issue of the weekly program guide CBC Times was published, to help Canadians keep track of programming.
  • The Broadcasting Corporation of Newfoundland, as the province joined Confederation.

    The national public broadcaster acquired the facilities and staff of the Broadcasting Corporation of Newfoundland, as the province joined Confederation.
  • First issue of the radio program guide.

    First issue of the radio program guide.
  • Special coverage of the four-week visit of Princess Elizabeth.

    Special coverage of the four-week visit of Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh.
  • Radio programming made available to Canadian troops in Korea.

    Radio programming made available to Canadian troops in Korea.
  • The first private television station.

    The first private television station, also the first CBC Television affiliate, opened in Sudbury, Ontario.
  • Commonwealth Games came to Vancouver.

    Commonwealth Games came to Vancouver and CBC/Radio-Canada played host broadcaster for this international event.
  • First telecast of opening of Parliament.

    First telecast of opening of Parliament.
  • Special coverage of the Hungarian uprising.

    Special coverage of the Hungarian uprising, the Suez crisis and the Springhill Mine disaster.
  • Major political coverage included a five-hour federal election telecast.

    Major political coverage included a five-hour federal election telecast and, the first opening of Parliament by a reigning monarch.
  • First coast-to-coast live television broadcast.

  • Special coverage of the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway.

  • The Board of Broadcast Governors (BBG) recommended licensing.

    The Board of Broadcast Governors (BBG) recommended licensing.
    The Board of Broadcast Governors (BBG) recommended licensing second TV stations in major cities and invited applications for Canada's first private network.
  • Trans-Canada and Dominion networks are consolidated.

    Trans-Canada and Dominion networks are consolidated.
  • Satellite broadcasting was introduced.

    Satellite broadcasting was introduced.
    Satellite broadcasting was introduced and made it possible to send and receive television signals anywhere in the world.
  • The federal Government announced its policy on colour television.

  • The first broadcast of taped television in the North.

  • The first televised national debate among Canadian political party leaders.

  • Satellite broadcasting allowed for people to use around the world.

    Satellite broadcasting allowed for people to use around the world.
    Satellite broadcasting allowed people around the world to watch the images transmitted from the moon landing.
  • Tobacco advertising was discontinued on CBC/Radio-Canada airwaves.

    Tobacco advertising was discontinued on CBC/Radio-Canada airwaves.
  • The first CRTC-issued network licences for CBC/Radio-Canada.

    The first CRTC-issued network licences for CBC/Radio-Canada.
    The first CRTC-issued network licences for CBC/Radio-Canada.
  • First transmitted moving images.

    1st moving images were transmitted between Washington, DC and New York City.
  • The national public broadcaster's International Service was renamed Radio Canada International (RCI).

  • First live television service to the North, via Anik satellite.

  • Accelerated Coverage Plan to extend CBC/Radio-Canada's radio and television services to small, un-served communities.

  • The English FM stereo network was opened.

    The English FM stereo network was opened.
  • A practical videotape recording system.

    A practical videotape recording system.
    A practical videotape recording system for home use became available.
  • CRTC Hearings began on pay television in Canada.

  • CRTC denies pay TV applications.

    CRTC denies pay TV applications.
  • Live television coverage of House of Commons.

    The start of live television coverage of House of Commons via satellite and cable TV.
  • CBC/Radio-Canada introduced closed captioning on Canadian television.

    CBC/Radio-Canada introduced closed captioning on Canadian television.
    CBC/Radio-Canada introduced closed captioning on Canadian television.
  • The opening of Cancom, a network service to provide remote communities with television services by satellite.

    The opening of Cancom, a network service to provide remote communities with television services by satellite.
  • Consumers could subscribe to direct delivery.

    Consumers could subscribe to direct delivery.
    Consumers could subscribe to direct delivery of programming to their homes, instead of cable systems or conventional broadcast programming.
  • The federal Government created the Broadcast Program Development Fund

    The federal Government created the Broadcast Program Development Fund
  • The national public broadcaster was host broadcaster for the 12-day papal visit.

  • The CRTC licensed 10 new specialty channels.

  • Cabinet approved CBC's licence to operate an all-news channel.

    Cabinet approved CBC's licence to operate an all-news channel, paving the way for the launch of CBC Newsworld in 1989.
    The CBC Broadcast Centre Development Project in Toronto received cabinet approval in April and work began a few months later, in October.
  • CBC Toronto consolidated its operations into one downtown location.

    CBC Toronto consolidated its operations into one downtown location.
    CBC Toronto consolidated its operations into one downtown location, the new state-of-the-art Canadian Broadcasting Centre.
  • CBC/Radio-Canada is host broadcaster for the Commonwealth Games

  • Over 1 billion TV sets worldwide.

    Over 1 billion TV sets worldwide.
    Over 1 billion TV sets worldwide.
  • (FCC) approved the broadcast standards .

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) approved the broadcast standards for high-definition television (HDTV).
  • CBC Television boasted an all-Canadian prime-time schedule.

  • CBC/Radio-Canada launches a new digitial audio music service, Galaxie.

    CBC/Radio-Canada launches a new digitial audio music service, Galaxie.
  • The International Olympic Committee awarded Canada's national public broadcaster.

  • CBC/Radio/Radio-Canada is host broadcaster for the Pan Am Games in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

    CBC/Radio/Radio-Canada is host broadcaster for the Pan Am Games in Winnipeg, Manitoba.
  • David Suzuki's The Nature of Things celebrated 40 years on CBC Television.

    David Suzuki's The Nature of Things celebrated 40 years on CBC Television.
    David Suzuki's The Nature of Things celebrated 40 years on CBC Television.
  • Hockey Night in Canada and La Soirée du hockey launched their 50th season.

  • The FCC mandated TV manufacturers.

    The FCC mandated TV manufacturers.
    The FCC mandated that TV manufacturers must equip all new TVs with tuners capable of receiving digital signals by 2007.
  • CBC/Radio-Canada celebrated the 50th anniversary of public television in Canada.

    CBC/Radio-Canada celebrated the 50th anniversary of public television in Canada with various events, including an historic visit by Queen Elizabeth to the Canadian Broadcasting Centre in Toronto and, in partnership with VIA Rail, a special anniversary train that travelled across the country.
  • As It Happens celebrated 35 years on CBC Radio.

  • The Prairie Aboriginal Content Unit was created.

  • Radio-Canada brought together radio, television and digital platforms.

    Radio-Canada brought together radio, television and digital platforms, keeping pace with audience desires to consume their content when and how they want.
  • The daily program Virginie, which had run on Télévision de Radio-Canada since 1996.

  • 3.7 million people tuned in to CBC Television to watch the first episode of Little Mosque on the Prairie.

  • CBC announced its intergration of radio, television and digital media.

    CBC announced its integration of radio, television and digital media.
  • The Beijing Olympics were brought to Canadians by the national public broadcaster.

    The Beijing Olympics were brought to Canadians by the national public broadcaster, who made history by launching the most robust online Olympic experience in Canadian history: CBC/Radio-Canada's websites featured 13 broadband video streams with thousands of hours of live and on-demand event coverage. Through a partnership with Bell, Bell Mobility subscribers were able to receive live streaming video and on-demand highlight pac
  • The FCC mandates no more broadcasting by antennae.

    The FCC mandates no more broadcasting by antennae.
    The FCC mandates no more broadcasting by antennae, only by digital. The transmission frequencies are sold to improve wireless internet capabilities for handheld devices.
  • CBC Television marked two important milestones.

  • Four million monthly visitors came to Radio-Canada.ca and CBC.ca

    Four million monthly visitors came to Radio-Canada.ca and CBC.ca - both sites are extremely popular with Canadians.
  • When you are starting your career.

    You just received your first big pay and want to spend it!
    I spend it on a new computer and connect to the local internet feed (free).
  • When your first child is born.

    Will they watch the same things you did?
    No, because learning will probably have been optimized further than now.
  • When your son/daughter is your current age.

    They will be learning about their future professions, which they have already chosen.