U.S. History

  • Massacre at Mystic

    Massacre at Mystic
    Connecticut colonists under Captain John Mason and their Narragansett and Mohegan allies set fire to the Pequot Fort near the Mystic River
  • The Scalp Act

    Anyone who brought in a male scalp above age of 12 would be given 150 pieces of eight, ($150), for females above age of 12 or males under the age of 12, they would be paid $130
  • Boston Tea Party

    Boston Tea Party
    The Sons of Liberty were upset much like everyone else about taxation in Britain so they decided to protest by dressing as Native Americans and throwing tea in the harbor.
  • Battle of Lexington and Concord

    Battle of Lexington and Concord
    These battles were the first engagements of the Revolutionary war.
  • The Battles of Lexington and Concord

    The Battles of Lexington and Concord
    The first military engagements of the revolutionary war. American victory, but Britain did destroy some supplies.
  • Signing of the Declaration

    Signing of the Declaration
    The declaration was signed in Philadelphia at the Pennsylvania state house.
  • The Winter at Valley Forge

    The Winter at Valley Forge
    The Winter at Valley Forge was spent encamped by General George Washington and his Continental Army during the Revolutionary War.
  • Article of Confederation are Ratified

    Article of Confederation are Ratified
    Congress adopted the Article of Confederation on November 15, 1777. It wasn't ratified by all 13 states until March 3rd.
  • Battle of Yorktown

    Battle of Yorktown
    This was the last major battle of the revolution and marked our new independence.
  • The 3/5ths Compromise

    The 3/5ths Compromise
    compromise agreement between delegates from the Northern and the Southern states at the United States Constitutional Convention (1787) that three-fifths of the slave population would be counted for determining direct taxation and representation in the House of Representatives.
  • Constitution Ratified

    Constitution Ratified
    June 6th 1788, the constitution was ratified after a long thought-out process to assure stability in the United States.
  • Presidential Inauguration of George Washington

    Presidential Inauguration of George Washington
    On Tuesday April 30th, on the balcony of Federal Hall in New York City, George Washington was inaugurated almost two months into his first term as president.
  • Washington’s Farewell Address

    Washington’s Farewell Address
    Rather than being spoken by himself, he had his address published in papers for all to read and reflect on.
  • Death of George Washington

    Death of George Washington
    December 14th, the first U.S. president George Washington died of a throat infection. His death
  • Election Day, 1800

    Election Day, 1800
    This election was a very powerful and important one, it was the first peaceful transfer of power we had seen.
  • Marbury vs. Madison

    Marbury vs. Madison
    The U.S. Supreme Court first declared an act of congress unconstitutional and established judicial review.
  • Battle of Tippecanoe

    Battle of Tippecanoe
    victory of a seasoned U.S. expeditionary force under Major General William Henry Harrison over Shawnee Indians led by Tecumseh's brother Laulewasikau (Tenskwatawa), known as the Prophet
  • The Battle of Baltimore

    The Battle of Baltimore
    Sea/Land battle with Britain attacking America. Americans fought off the attackers to get them out of Baltimore city and ports.
  • The Missouri Compromise

    The Missouri Compromise
    balanced desires of northern states to prevent expansion of slavery in the country with those of southern states to expand it.
  • Indian Removal Act

    Indian Removal Act
    authorizing the president to grant lands west of the Mississippi in exchange for Indian lands within existing state borders.
  • Trail of Tears

    Trail of Tears
    a series of forced displacements of approximately 60,000 Indigenous people of the "Five Civilized Tribes" between 1830 and 1850 by the United States government. Part of the Indian removal, the ethnic cleansing was gradual, occurring over a period of nearly two decades.
  • Nat Turner Rebellion

    Nat Turner Rebellion
    a rebellion of enslaved Virginians that took place in Southampton County, Virginia, in August 1831, led by Nat Turner. The rebels killed between 55 and 65 people, at least 51 of whom were White
  • The Battle of the Alamo

    The Battle of the Alamo
    The Mexican army led by Santa Anna killed nearly every Texan and Trejano inside the alamo in a 13-day siege. This however fuelled the rest of Texas to fight the Mexican Army.
  • The Fugitive Slave Act

    The Fugitive Slave Act
    required that slaves be returned to their owners, even if they were in a free state.
  • Dred Scott Decision

    Dred Scott Decision
    decision of the United States Supreme Court in which the Court held that the United States Constitution was not meant to include American citizenship for people of African descent, regardless of whether they were enslaved or free, and so the rights and privileges that the Constitution confers upon American citizens could not apply to them
  • The Dead Rabbits Riot

    The Dead Rabbits Riot
    The Dead Rabbits riot was a two-day civil disturbance in New York City evolving from what was originally a small-scale street fight between members of the Dead Rabbits and the Bowery Boys into a citywide gang war, which occurred July 4–5, 1857
  • Emancipation Proclamation

    Emancipation Proclamation
    The proclamation declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free."
  • Slave Trade Ends in the United States

    Slave Trade Ends in the United States
    The practice of slavery continued to be legal in much of the U.S. until 1865, of course, and enslaved people continued to be bought and sold within the Southern states, but in January 1808 the legal flow of new Africans into this country stopped forever.
  • 13th Amendment

    13th Amendment
    Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
  • 14th Amendment

    14th Amendment
    No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States
  • The Ku Klux Klan is Established

    The Ku Klux Klan is Established
    The KKK is established in Pulaski Tennesee.
  • John D. Rockefeller Creates Standard Oil

    John D. Rockefeller Creates Standard Oil
    John D. Rockefeller Creates Standard Oil and gets super-rich
  • 15th Amendment

    15th Amendment
    granted African American men the right to vote.
  • Alexander Graham Bell Patents the Telephone

    Alexander Graham Bell Patents the Telephone
    On March 7, 1876, 29-year-old Alexander Graham Bell receives a patent for his revolutionary new invention: the telephone. The Scottish-born Bell worked in London with his father, Melville Bell, who developed Visible Speech, a written system used to teach speaking to the deaf.
  • Battle of Little Bighorn

    Battle of Little Bighorn
    Native American forces led by Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull defeat the U.S. Army troops of Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer in the Battle of the Little Bighorn near southern Montana's Little Bighorn River.
  • The Great Oklahoma Land Race

    The Great Oklahoma Land Race
    50,000 people were lined up at the start, seeking to gain a piece of the available two million acres
  • Battle of Wounded Knee

    Battle of Wounded Knee
    The Wounded Knee Massacre, also known as the Battle of Wounded Knee, was a massacre of nearly three hundred Lakota people by soldiers of the United States Army.
  • Ellis Island Opens to Process Immigrants

    Ellis Island Opens to Process Immigrants
    Ellis Island opens in New York to accept immigrants on the east coast
  • Plessy vs. Ferguson

    Plessy vs. Ferguson
    decision that upheld the constitutionality of racial segregation under the “separate but equal” doctrine. The case stemmed from an 1892 incident in which African American train passenger Homer Plessy refused to sit in a car for Black people.
  • The sinking of the USS Maine

    The sinking of the USS Maine
    An explosion came out of nowhere and sank the USS Maine killing 266 of the ship's 354 crew members in Havana, Cuba.
  • The Wizard of Oz (Book) is Published

    The Wizard of Oz (Book) is Published
    The Wizard of Oz is a distinctly American fairy tale and, a century after it was first published, one of the longest-running mass media sensations. The Wizard of Oz was published in 1900 when its author, L. Frank Baum, was 44 years old.
  • J.P. Morgan Founds U.S. Steel

    J.P. Morgan Founds U.S. Steel
    J.P. Morgan Founds U.S. Steel and makes bank because everyone needed steel to build
  • Teddy Roosevelt Becomes President of the United States

    Teddy Roosevelt Becomes President of the United States
    After Mckinney dies, T.R. becomes president
  • Ford Motor Company is Founded

    Ford Motor Company is Founded
    Ford Motor Company is founded in Detroit Michigan
  • Ida Tarbell Publishes Her Article About Standard Oil

    Ida Tarbell Publishes Her Article About Standard Oil
    Born in Pennsylvania at the onset of the oil boom, Tarbell wrote her 1904 book The History of the Standard Oil Company. The book was published as a series of articles in McClure's Magazine from 1902 to 1904. It has been called a "masterpiece of investigative journalism"
  • The 16th Amendment is Passed

    The 16th Amendment is Passed
    The Sixteenth Amendment (Amendment XVI) to the United States Constitution allows Congress to levy an income tax without apportioning it among the states on the basis of population. It was passed by Congress in 1909 in response to the 1895 Supreme Court case of Pollock v. Farmers' Loan & Trust Co.
  • Angel Island Opens to Process Immigrants

    Angel Island Opens to Process Immigrants
    the major port of entry to the U.S. for Asians and other immigrants coming from the west.
  • The 17th Amendment is Passed

    The 17th Amendment is Passed
    This allows for voters to directly vote for senators
  • The Adoption of the Star Spangled Banner as the National Anthem

    The Adoption of the Star Spangled Banner as the National Anthem
    Herbert Hoover signed a bill into law that made the Star Spangled Banner the official national anthem of the United States.
  • The Empire State Building Opens

    The Empire State Building Opens
    President Herbert Hoover officially dedicates New York City's Empire State Building, pressing a button from the White House that turns on the building's lights.