The History of Women by Shania Sheikh

By sheikh1
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    Women's History

    In the beggining of the 1900's women had no rights. They weren't even considered a person under the law. Once women were married nothing was their own. They got no share of their husbands money and they didn't have the right to vote.
    (if i use the date 1 jan with any year that means year is accurate but date was not found)
    Therefore women had no rights and freedoms.
  • Women first get the vote

    Women first get the vote
    Women finally got the right to vote. In the previous years men believed that women were a weaker sex, they believed that women needed guidance and protection.
    Women suffragettes like Nellie McClung,Emily Murphy and Ada Powers have lobbied,heckled and ridiculed politicians for denying them their rights. They collected petitions, held rallies, and fought to have their voices heard. Finally, after all that fighting, Manitoba became the first to grant women their right to vote.
  • Women can vote in Saskatchewan

    Women can vote in Saskatchewan
    Women get the right to vote in Saskatchewan
  • Women vote in Alberta

    Women vote in Alberta
    Women get the vote in Alberta
  • Cocasian Women get the right

    Cocasian Women get the right
    Caucasian women get the right to vote in Britich Columbia.
  • War Time Elction Act

    War Time Elction Act
    Women with male relatives in the Great War get the right to vote.
    this included the german candians and the ukrainian canadians.
  • Ontario Franchise Act

    Ontario Franchise Act
    This act grants women the right to vote.
  • Nova Scotia Franchise Act

    Nova Scotia Franchise Act
    Women get the right to vote in Nova Scotia.
  • Act to Confer Elctoral Franchise Act

    Act to Confer Elctoral Franchise Act
    This act is a major victory for suffragettes. Grants all caucasian women the right to vote. doesn't include Asian and Aboriginals.
  • New Brunswick Electoral Act

    New Brunswick Electoral Act
    This Act gives Caucasian women under the age of 21 the right to vote.
  • Dominion Elctions Act

    Dominion Elctions Act
    Every eligible Canadian over the age of 21 male or female has the right to vote in the federal elctions.
    (couldn't find exact date,however the year is accurate)
  • Prince Edward Island

    Prince Edward Island
    Prince Edward Island becoms the 10th government in Canada to grant Caucasian women over the age 21 to vote.
  • Married Women's Property Act

    Married Women's Property Act
    (Occured after 10th vote grant)(accurate year)
    Women no longer have to worry about not having property rights after getting married. The days are gone when mariage meant gaining a husband and losing your rights.
  • Women become a person under the law

    Women become a person under the law
    Women were finally considered women under the law. Women were considered people earlier because according to the common law women couldn't hold office. Before 1867, it was established that women weren't alowed to sit in parliament.
  • Quebec at last

    Quebec at last
    Quebec becomes the last existing province to grant women the right to vote and run for office by signing the act granting women the right to vote and to be eligible as candidates.
  • Women allowed to join the army

    Women allowed to join the army
    Women finally get the chance to help the world. The legislation changes to allow women to join the Canadian Army.
  • Fair Employment in Ontario

    Fair Employment in Ontario
    Female Employee's Fair Remuneration Act was passed. This act allowed women to be paid the same wage as men for the same amount of work. Now women would not be relegated to dead end jobs.
  • Equal Pay Comes to Saskatchewan

    Equal Pay Comes to Saskatchewan
    The Equal Pay Act says that women be paid the same wage as men for doing similar work in Saskatchewan.
  • Equal Pay

    Equal Pay
    Ontario, BC, Nova Scotia and Manitoba join in to pay women the same wage as men.
    (dates not specified, year is accurate)
  • Federal Government adopts the Female Employees Equal Pay Act

    Federal Government adopts the Female Employees Equal Pay Act
    Federal Cabineet makes a declaration of equal wages. The Feamle Equal Pay Act makes discrimination in wages on account of sex aggainst the law.
  • Promoting equal pay

    Promoting equal pay
    Nova Scotia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, BC and Saskatchewan promote Equal wages in Canada by reinforcing the act with a new statement. The new statement says that all employees must be paid equal for similar work no matter what race, colour, creed, gender and ethnic origin.
  • Alberta introduces Equal pay for Equal work

    Alberta introduces Equal pay for Equal work
    Women must be paid the same wage as men for the same or similar work. They may not be paid less or more.
  • The Birth of Human Rights Codes

    The Birth of Human Rights Codes
    n 1962, the province of Ontario repealed most of its human rights laws in order to make way for the Ontario Human Rights Code - the first comprehensive human rights code in Canada. It sends the message that discrimination is a public matter. As such, victims of discrimination receive the full support of the government of Ontario in the shape of the Ontario Human Rights Commission.Finally, discrimination is recognized as a serious issue.
  • Status of Women

    Status of Women
    Royal Commission on the Status of Women was established.
  • Canada adopts the Canadian Human Rights Act

    Canada adopts the Canadian Human Rights Act
    1977 Parliament adopted the Canadian Human Rights Act, which forbids discrimination on the basis of sex and ensures women equal pay for work of equal value. The Act also created the Canadian Human Rights Commission, to promote knowledge of human rights in Canada and to encourage people to follow principles of equality; to provide a way to resolve individual complaints; and to help reduce barriers to equality in employment and access to services.
  • Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

    Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
    This Charter protects everyones rights. No matter how old, what gender, race, religion you are. It protects your rights and your freedoms. No one can take these away unless you are sentenced or in court.
  • Indian Act

    Indian Act
    Indian Act is passed giving aboriginal women the right to reatin their native status and to pass that on to their children if they marry non native men.
  • Equity in Employment

    Equity in Employment
    Applies to federal regulated employees but not to federal public service. Employment equity requires employers to identify and eliminate unnecessary barriers that limit the employment opportunities of historically disadvantaged groups such as visible minorities, women, and Aboriginal persons.
  • Enforcing Employment Equity

    Enforcing Employment Equity
    The Canadian National Railway Company ("CNR") hired very few women. In 1987, women made up only 0.7 per cent of CNR's unskilled work force even though they represented 41 percent of Canada's labour force. The CNR had broken s.10 of the Canadian Human Rights Act.
  • Harassment as a form of Discrimination

    Harassment as a form of Discrimination
    Sexual harassment was found to be a form of discrimination because only the female employees ran the risk of being harassed. The men who worked as waiters, cashiers, or bus boys had never been harassed. In other words, women were treated differently than men at Pharos strictly because they were women - and that was discrimination.
  • Ontario Law

    Ontario Law
    In 1993, the Ontario law caled for the province to pay women and men equally for equal amount of experience and training.
  • Law against discrimination

    Law against discrimination
    The Extradition Act is passed. This law is the last step to making women have the same rights as men. This law makes sure that punishments don't vary in account to race, gender, religion, age or opinion.
  • Charter Challenge Launched

    Charter Challenge Launched
    Four Ontario Women and Five Labour Unions launched a Charter challenge, arguing that the province was discriminating against them based on gender. Based on the Ontario law, in 2003 before courts began a hearing the Ontario government agreed to pay female workers a total of $414 million.
  • Charter Challenge (cont.)

    Charter Challenge (cont.)
    The Ontario Government agreed to pay female workers a total of $414 million in pay ajustments before starting the hearing.