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THE WOMEN'S RIGHTS MOVEMENT

  • The first gathering devoted to women's in Seneca Falls, New York

    The first gathering devoted to women's in Seneca Falls, New York
  • lifetime alliance as women’s rights activists

    lifetime alliance as women’s rights activists
    Stanton and Susan B. Anthony forged a lifetime alliance as women’s rights activists.
  • they agitated against the denial of basic economic freedoms to women

    they agitated against the denial of basic economic freedoms to women
    Stanton and Susan B
  • two distinct factions of the suffrage movement emerged.

    two distinct factions of the suffrage movement emerged.
    Stanton and Anthony created the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA)
  • the first state to grant women complete voting rights was Wyoming

    the first state to grant women complete voting rights was Wyoming
  • Senator Aaron Sargent

    California Senator Aaron Sargent introduced in Congress a women’s suffrage amendment
  • the two wings of the women’s rights movement struggled to maintain momentum.

    the two wings of the women’s rights movement struggled to maintain momentum.
  • surge of volunteerism among middle-class women

    surge of volunteerism among middle-class women
    the turning point came in the late 1880s and early 1890s, when the nation experienced a surge of volunteerism among middle-class women—activists in progressive causes, members of women’s clubs and professional societies
  • e two groups united to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA).

    e two groups united to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA).
    to capitalize on their newfound “constituency,” the two groups united to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA).
  • The second western state to grant women complete voting rights was Colorado

  • The second western state grant women complete voting rights was Utah

  • The third western state grant women complete voting rights was Idaho

  • NAWSA was founded in Utah Idaho and Colorado

  • Between 1910 and 1914, the NAWSA intensified its lobbying efforts

    1910 and 1914, the NAWSA intensified its lobbying efforts and additional states extended the franchise to women: Washington, California, Arizona, Kansas, and Oregon.
  • Congresswoman Ruth Hanna McCormick helped lead the fight for suffrage as a lobbyist in Springfield

    In Illinois, future Congresswoman Ruth Hanna McCormick helped lead the fight for suffrage as a lobbyist in Springfield, when the state legislature granted women the right to vote
  • the rival Congressional Union (later named the National Woman’s Party)

    Alice Paul, a young Quaker activist who had experience in the English suffrage movement, formed the rival Congressional Union (later named the National Woman’s Party)
  • Montana granted women the right to vote

  • “Winning Plan"

    Carrie Chapman Catt creates “Winning Plan” strategy called for disciplined and relentless efforts to achieve state referenda on the vote, especially in non-Western states
  • Suffragists parade in New York City with a banner that reads "President Wilson favors votes for women."

  • Arkansas and New York granted partial and full voting rights.

  • President Wilson (a convert to the suffrage cause) urged Congress to pass a voting rights amendment.

  • Jeannette Rankin was sworn into the 65th Congress , as the first woman to serve in the national legislature

  • the House of Representatives initially passed a voting rights amendment

    the House of Representatives initially passed a voting rights amendment
  • Congress with the House again voting its approval by a wide margin

  • Senate concurring

  • Lady Astor became the first woman to serve as a Member of the British Parliament.

    Lady Astor became the first woman to serve as a Member of the British Parliament.
  • The constitutional victory of suffrage reformers

  • the public enthusiasm for further efforts decreased, contributing to women’s difficulty

    the public enthusiasm for further efforts decreased, contributing to women’s difficulty in the early 1920s to use their new political gain as an instrument for social change.
  • faced a Herculean task in consolidating their power and in sustaining legislation that was important to women

  • Robertson, elected from an Oklahoma district to the U.S. House was the second woman to serve in Congress.

  • the 19th Amendment, providing full voting rights for women nationally, was ratified when Tennessee became the 36th state to approve it.

    the 19th Amendment, providing full voting rights for women nationally, was ratified when Tennessee became the 36th state to approve it.
  • the women’s movement underwent fundamental change or sustained continuity in the years before and after 1920

  • The monument is featured prominently in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol.

    Portrait Monument to Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony, honors three of the suffrage movement’s leaders.
  • The first woman to serve in the U.S. Senate

    Rebecca Latimer Felton of Georgia, the first woman to serve in the U.S. Senate, poses at her desk in the Senate Office Building.
  • Women crowd a voting poll in New York City during elections

  • Nancy Langhorne Astor (Lady Astor), left, and Alice Robertson make an appearance at the National Press Club in Washington

  • Democratic National Committee

    Emily N. Blair, a Missouri suffragist and the vice president of the Democratic National Committee