Women rights

Changing Role of Women in 19th and 20th Century

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    Changin Role of Women in 19th and 20th Century

  • William Thompson and Anna Wheeler: 'Appeal on behalf of one half of the human race, women...'

    William Thompson and Anna Wheeler: 'Appeal on behalf of one half of the human race, women...'
    First major statement on women's right to political equality written in the English language.
  • Isabella Tod founds Northern Irelands Society for Women's Suffrage

    Isabella Tod founds Northern Irelands Society for Women's Suffrage
    Tod organised the first suffrage society in the country, the North of Ireland Women's Suffrage Committee, and her speeches were widely reported in the suffrage journals and daily newspapers in both Ireland and England. She shared platforms with, and was a friend of, many of the leading English suffragists. In February 1872 Tod embarked on the first Irish campaign to secure the vote for women, addressing meetings at Belfast, Carrickfergus, Coleraine and Londonderry. On 21 February she addressed a
  • Anna & Thomas Haslam found Dublin Women's Suffrage Association

    Anna & Thomas Haslam found Dublin Women's Suffrage Association
    In 1876 Anna Haslem formed the Dublin Women’s Suffrage Society. This was the best known of Irish suffrage groups. As the scope of the society broadened, it became the Irishwomen’s Suffrage and Local Government Association and attracted both Nationalists and Unionists alike. Their methods of promoting suffrage relied on organising petitions, drawing room meetings and lobbying MPs. After changing its name on a number of occasions, it became the Irish Women’s Suffrage and Local Government Associati
  • Intermediate Education Act provides new opportunities in education for women.

    Intermediate Education Act provides new opportunities in education for women.
  • Royal University Act. Higher education for women.

    Royal University Act. Higher education for women.
  • Ladies’ Land League founded.

    Ladies’ Land League founded.
  • First women graduate from Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin.

  • Gaelic League founded; men and women admitted on equal terms.

    Gaelic League founded; men and women admitted on equal terms.
  • Local Government Act. Women can be elected to some local councils.

  • Bean na hÉireann, Ireland’s first women’s paper, published by Inghínidhe na hÉireann.

    Bean na hÉireann, Ireland’s first women’s paper, published by Inghínidhe na hÉireann.
  • Irish Women’s Workers’ Union founded.

  • Women's Suffrage bill defeated

  • Cumann na mBan founded

    Cumann na mBan founded
  • General election; women over 30 may vote for parliament for the first time.

  • Countess Markievicz the first woman elected to the British House of Commons

    Countess Markievicz the first woman elected to the British House of Commons
  • IWLA publish 'Chains or Change'

  • 'Contraceptive Train' to Belfast and back

    'Contraceptive Train' to Belfast and back
  • Marriage bar is removed

    The marriage bar in the public service was removed in July 1973, on foot of the report of the first Commission on the Status of Women. In 1977, the Employment Equality Act prohibited discrimination on the grounds of gender or marital status in almost all areas of employment.
  • Social Welfare Act entitled mothers to collect child allowance

  • Legislation for Equal Pay is introduced

  • Women to be included in Jury Service

  • Family Law Act entitles one spouse to seek a barring order against the other where the welfare or safety of a spouse or children was at risk

    Women's Aid campaigned for changes in the law, and in 1976 the Family Law Act, Ireland's first legislation on domestic violence, enabled one spouse to seek a barring order against the other where the welfare or safety of a spouse or children was at risk. The orders were for three months and were poorly implemented. In 1981, protection orders were introduced and barring orders were increased up to 12 months.
  • Employment Equality Legislation introduced

  • Contraception to be sold to anyone over the age of 18, but only in Chemists

    The Commission on the Status of Women in 1972 delicately suggested that "parents have the right to regulate the number and spacing of their family" but stopped short of an open demand for contraception. The Rotunda Hospital, the Irish Family Planning Association and student unions began to distribute contraceptives. The law, however, changed very slowly. The McGee case of 1973 established a right to import contraceptives for personal use, but did not allow them to be sold. A Bill to allow for co
  • Marital Rape is defined as a crime

    The Council for the Status of Women urged the creation of a crime of marital rape. In 1979 the Minister for Justice Gerard Collins declined to introduce legislation to this effect. Even when new legislation on rape was introduced in 1981, the situation did not change. It was not until 1990 that marital rape was defined as a crime. The first trial, in 1992, collapsed within minutes. The first successful prosecution for marital rape was in 2002.
  • Mary Robinson elected first female Irish president

    Mary Robinson elected first female Irish president