Indian Removal

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    Indian removal act

  • Alexander McGillivray

    Alexander McGillivray
    Alexander Mcgillivray was born on December 15, 1750
  • John Marshall

    John Marshall
    John Marshall was born on September 24, 1755
  • Sequoyah

    Sequoyah
    Sequoyah was born in 1767
  • Andrew Jackson

    Andrew Jackson
    Andrew Jackson was born on March 15, 1767
  • William Mclntosh was born

    William Mclntosh was born
    William McIntosh Jr., also known as Tustunnuggee Hutkee ("White Warrior"), was born around 1775 in the Lower Creek town of Coweta to Captain William McIntosh, a Scotsman of Savannah, and Senoya, a Creek woman of the Wind Clan. He was raised among the Creeks, but he spent enough time in Savannah to become fluent in English and to be able to move comfortably within both Indian and white societies.
  • Oconee War

    The Oconee War was a military conflict in the 1780s and 1790s between European Americans and the Creek Indians known as the Oconee, who lived in an area between the Apalachee and North Oconee rivers in the state of Georgia.
  • Treaty of New york

    The Yazoo land grants by Georgia and the federal government's desire to take control of Indian affairs led to U.S. president George Washington's signing of the 1790 Treaty of New York, in which the United States promised to defend Creek territorial rights. This treaty created a formal relationship between the United States and the Creek Nation and affirmed McGillivray's position as a legitimate national leader.
  • John ross

    John ross
    John Ross was born on october 3, 1790
  • Alexander Mcgillivray

    Alexander Mcgillivray
    Alexander Mcgillivray died on Feb. 17, 1793
  • Alexander Mcgillivray impact

    After the Revolution, McGillivray used his growing influence within Creek society to resist Georgia's attempt to confiscate three million acres of land and to otherwise protect what he viewed as the sovereign rights of the Creek people. Oconee war led to removal of Creeks west of Oconee River.
  • Mclntosh

    Mclntosh
    McIntosh's participation in the 1825 Treaty of Indian Springs (signed away all Creek lands) cost him his life. According to a Creek law that McIntosh himself had supported, a sentence of execution awaited any Creek leader who ceded land to the United States without the full assent of the entire Creek Nation. Just before dawn on April 30, 1825, Upper Creek chief Menawa, accompanied by 200 Creek warriors, attacked McIntosh to carry out the sentence. They set fire to his home, and shot and stabbed
  • William Mclntosh dies

    William Mclntosh dies
    He died on April 30, 1825
  • John ross

    John ross
    As Ross took the reins of the Cherokee government in 1827, white Georgians increased their lobbying efforts to remove the Cherokees from the Southeast. The discovery of gold on Cherokee land fueled their desire to possess the area, which was dotted with lucrative businesses and prosperous plantations like Ross's. The Indian Removal Bill passed by Congress in 1830 provided legal authority to begin the removal process. Ross's fight against the 1832 Georgia lottery, designed to give away Cherokee l
  • John ross

    John ross
    John Ross became chief of the Cherokee Nation in 1827, following the establishment of a government modeled on that of the United States. He presided over the nation during the apex of its development in the Southeast, the tragic Trail of Tears, and the subsequent rebuilding of the nation in Indian Territory, in present-day Oklahoma.
  • Danlohonega gold rush

    Danlohonega gold rush
    In 1828 Dahlonega was the site of the first major gold rush in the United States
  • Indian removal act

    The European Americans wanted to settle the land, and they demanded the government relocate the Creek, which contributed eventually to passage of the Indian Removal Act of 1830, setting policy and implementation of removal of all the southeastern tribes to west of the Mississippi River.
  • Trail of tears

    Trail of tears
    At the beginning of the 1830s, nearly 125,000 Native Americans lived on millions of acres of land in Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, North Carolina and Florida--land their ancestors had occupied and cultivated for generations. By the end of the decade, very few natives remained anywhere in the southeastern United States. Working on behalf of white settlers who wanted to grow cotton on the Indians’ land, the federal government forced them to leave their homelands and walk thousands of miles to a spe
  • John Marshall

    John Marshall
    When Jackson proposed the Indian Removal Act, Chief Justice John Marshall and the Supreme Court rule against it. Jackson refuses to support Supreme Court rule and states "John Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it." Jackson goes on to pass the law, and in the process, he also proposed voluntary emigration in the west for the Indians.
  • Andrew Jackson

    Andrew Jackson
    While frequently frowned upon in the North, the Removal Act was popular in the South, where population growth, slavery, and the discovery of gold on Cherokee land had increased pressure on tribal lands. The state of Georgia became involved in a dispute with the Cherokees, culminating in the 1832 U.S. Supreme Court decision (Worcester v. Georgia) which ruled that Georgia could not impose its laws upon Cherokee tribal lands.
  • John Marshall

    John Marshall
    John Marshall died on july 6, 1835
  • Andrew Jackson impact

    Andrew Jackson impact
    The removal of the Native Americans to the west of the Mississippi River had been a major part of Andrew Jackson’s political agenda. After his election he signed the Indian Removal Act into law in 1830. The Act authorized the President to negotiate treaties to buy tribal lands in the east in exchange for lands further west, outside of existing U.S. state borders. He signed the Treaty of New Echota in 1835 that would remove all Cherokees from Georgia in exchange for lands in Oklahoma
  • Sequoyah

    Sequoyah
    Sequoyah dies on August in 1843
  • Andrew Jackson

    Andrew Jackson
    Andrew Jackson died on June 8, 1845
  • Worcester v. Georgia

    Worcester v. Georgia
    Worcester v. Georgia deals with Georgia state laws that were passed in the middle of the 1800s. These laws were passed following an agreement reached between the Cherokee tribe and the state government of Georgia. The laws instituted a prohibition of non-Indians from living in Indian territories. Only Non-Native Americans with special permission from the government were allowed to live on these lands.
  • John Ross

    John Ross
    Accompanying his people on the "trail where they cried," commonly known as the Trail of Tears, Ross experienced personal tragedy. His wife died of exposure after giving her only blanket to a sick child. Once in Indian Territory, Ross led the effort to establish farms, businesses, schools, and even colleges.
  • John ross

    John ross
    John ross died on august 1, 1866
  • William Mclntosh

    William Mclntosh
    William McIntosh was a controversial chief of the Lower Creeks in early-nineteenth-century Georgia. His general support of the United States and its efforts to obtain cessions of Creek territory alienated him from many Creeks who opposed white encroachment on Indian land.
  • Sequoyah

    Sequoyah
    It is fact that the syllabary was used to print some articles in the Cherokee Phoenix newspaper, published in New Echota, Georgia (then the capital of the eastern Cherokees), from 1828 to 1834. The appearance of the newspaper, as well as the organized government of the Cherokee Nation, including tribal council and supreme court, infuriated the state of Georgia, which had an agreement with the U.S. government (the Compact of 1802) to remove the Native Americans.