FROM THE FIRST FLEET TO THE 21ST CENTURY

  • First fleet lands Sydney Cove

    First fleet lands Sydney Cove
    In 1788 11 British ships arrived at Botany Bay Sydney Cove
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    FROM THE FIRST FLEET TO THE 21ST CENTURY

  • Mary Reibey

    Mary Reibey
    Mary Reibey was disguised as a boy and was going under the name of James Burrow. Sentenced to seven years' transportation, she arrived in Sydney, Australia, on the Royal Admiral in October 1792.
  • Christian Brothers

    Christian Brothers
    The Congregation of Christian Brothers is a worldwide religious community within the Catholic Church, founded by Edmund Rice. Their first school was opened in Waterford, Ireland, in 1802.
  • De La Salle brothers

    De La Salle brothers
    The Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, also known as the Christian Brothers, French Christian Brothers, Lasallian Brothers, or De La Salle Brothers is a Roman Catholic religious teaching congregation, founded in France by Jean-Baptiste de La Salle, and now based in Rome, Italy
  • The First public Mass

    The First public Mass
    The first public mass conducted by Fr James Dixon on Australian soil on May 15th 1803 at Port Jackson . This helped the catholics that had just arrived to Australia celebrate their religion and feel at peace.
  • The Castle Hill Rebellion

    The Castle Hill Rebellion
    The Castle Hill rebellion of 1804 was a rebellion by convicts against the colonial authority of the British colony of New South Wales in the Castle Hill area, in Sydney.
  • Presentation sisters

    Presentation sisters
    The Presentation Sisters, officially the Sisters of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, are a religious institute of Roman Catholic women founded in Cork, Ireland, by Venerable Nano Nagle in 1775. The Sisters of the congregation use the postnominal initials P.B.V.M.
  • Caroline Chisholm

    Caroline Chisholm
    Caroline Chisholm was a 19th-century English humanitarian known mostly for her support of immigrant female and family welfare in Australia. She is commemorated on 16 May in the calendar of saints of the Church of England.
  • The rum rebellion

    The rum rebellion
    The Rum Rebellion of 1808 was a coup d'état in the then-British penal colony of New South Wales, staged by the New South Wales Corps in order to depose Governor William Bligh
  • Sisters of Charity

    Sisters of Charity
    Mary Aikenhead founded the Sisters of Charity in 1815 as the first unenclosed religious women in Ireland. Their institutions cared for the sick and poor and welcomed all creeds. In 1834 they founded St Vincent's Dublin, the first hospital run by religious women in the English speaking world.
  • Marist brothers and fathers

    Marist brothers and fathers
    Br. Marcellin Champagnat, a priest (Marist Father, SM) from France, founded the Marist Brothers, with the goal of educating young people, especially those most neglected.
  • The beginning of catholic education

    The beginning of catholic education
    Parramatta Marist
    Founded in 1820 by John Therry, under the direction of George Morley it was the first Catholic school established in Australia, and second oldest school in Australia.
  • ST Marys Cathedral

    ST Marys Cathedral
    The foundation stone of St Mary’s Chapel is laid by Governor Macquarie and blessed by Fr Therry. The site is near a barren brickfield and Sydney’s convict barracks on land considered undesirable and without value. Father Connolly builds the first Catholic church in Tasmania
  • Fr Philip Connolly

    Fr Philip Connolly
    Philip Conolly, pioneer Catholic priest in Van Diemen's Land, arrived in Hobart in 1821. The first permanently appointed chaplain, he served bond and free alike. Perhaps his hardest role was to prepare convicted felons for death on the gallows.
  • The sisters of mercy

    The Religious Sisters of Mercy are members of a religious institute of Catholic women founded in 1831 in Dublin, Ireland, by Catherine McAuley. As of 2019, the institute has about 6200 sisters worldwide, organized into a number of independent congregations
  • Society of St Vincent de Paul

    Society of St Vincent de Paul
    The Society of St Vincent de Paul was founded in 1833 by Society Frédéric Ozanam.
  • William Davis

    In 1840 William Davis donated the land on which St Patrick’s is built, gifting that section of his 1809 grant bounded by Gloucester and Grosvenor Streets. The foundation stone was blessed on 25 August 1840, and the now elderly Davis astonished everyone when he came forward and placed a cheque for £1000 on the stone, an incredible sum in those days.
  • Mary MacKillop

    Mary MacKillop
    Mary Helen MacKillop RSJ was an Australian religious sister who has been declared a saint by the Catholic Church, as St Mary of the Cross. Of Scottish descent, she was born in Melbourne but is best known for her activities in South Australia.
  • Establishment of the Catholic Church

    Establishment of the Catholic Church
    The Catholic Church became established in Tasmania, then Van Diemen's Land, in 1821 with the arrival of Father Philip Connolly. At the time, about one third of the population was Roman Catholic. ... For most of Tasmania's history the proportion of Catholics to other religions has only been about one fifth
  • John Bebe Polding

    John Bebe Polding
    Polding was Appointed archbishop in 1843, he became primate of the Catholic church in Australia.
  • Gold Rushes

    Gold Rushes
    During the Australian gold rushes, starting in 1851, significant numbers of workers moved from elsewhere in Australia and overseas to where gold had been discovered.
  • Eureka Stockade

    Eureka Stockade
    Eureka Stockade, rebellion (December 3, 1854) in which gold prospectors in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia who sought various reforms, notably the abolition of mining licenses clashed with government forces. It was named for the rebels' hastily constructed fortification in the Eureka goldfield
  • Sisters of the Good Samaritan

    Sisters of the Good Samaritan
    The Congregation of the Sisters of the Good Samaritan, colloquially known as the "Good Sams", is a Roman Catholic congregation of religious women commenced by Bede Polding, OSB, Australia’s first Catholic bishop, in Sydney in 1857. The congregation was the first religious congregation to be founded in Australia.
  • Daniel Mannix

    Daniel Mannix
    Daniel Patrick Mannix was an Irish-born (1864) Catholic bishop. Mannix was the Archbishop of Melbourne for 46 years and one of the most influential public figures in 20th-century Australia.
  • Father Julian Tenison-Woods

    Father Julian Tenison-Woods
    Julian Edmund Tenison-Woods, commonly referred to as Father Woods, was a Catholic priest and geologist, active in Australia. With Mary MacKillop, he co-founded the Congregation of Sisters of St Joseph of the Sacred Heart at Penola in 1866
  • Establishment of the sisters of st joseph

    Establishment of the sisters of st joseph
    The Sisters of St Joseph of the Sacred Heart, often called the "Josephites" or "Brown Joeys", were founded in Penola, South Australia, in 1866 by Mary MacKillop and the Rev. Julian Tenison Woods. Members of the congregation use the postnominal initials
  • Establishment of the Sisters of St Joseph

    Establishment of the Sisters of St Joseph
    The Sisters of St Joseph of the Sacred Heart, often called the "Josephites" or "Brown Joeys", were founded in Penola, South Australia, in 1866 by Mary MacKillop and the Rev. Julian Tenison Woods. Members of the congregation use the postnominal initials RSJ.
  • Arrival of the Marist Brothers

    Arrival of the Marist Brothers
    The Marist Brothers arrived in Australia in 1872 at the invitation of the Archbishop of Sydney. The Brothers in Australia currently operate as two Provinces (administrative units) with centers in Sydney and Melbourne.
  • Patrick Moran

    Patrick Moran
    Patrick Francis Moran was the third Roman Catholic Archbishop of Sydney and the first cardinal appointed from Australia in 1884.
  • Norman Gilroy

    Norman Gilroy
    Sir Norman Thomas Gilroy KBE was an Australian archbishop. He was the first Australian-born cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church.
  • The White Australia policy

    The White Australia policy
    The White Australia policy is a term encapsulating a set of historical racial policies that aimed to forbid people of non-European ethnic origin, especially Asians and Pacific Islanders, from immigrating to Australia, starting in 1901. Australian furniture had to be labelled "Made with Chinese Labour".
  • World War 1

    World War 1
    World War I was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918
  • Conscription Debate

    Conscription Debate
    Conscription was also a debate about the obligations of citizenship. Those supporting conscription argued that: military service should not be an individual choice. the supreme duty a citizen owed to their country was to fight for it.
  • Immigration from Britain and Ireland

    Immigration from Britain and Ireland
    Irish migration to Great Britain has occurred from the earliest recorded history to the present. There has been a continuous movement of people between the islands of Ireland and Great Britain due to their proximity. This tide has ebbed and flowed in response to politics, economics and social conditions of both places.
  • The Great Depression

    The Great Depression
    The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across the world; in most countries, it started in 1929 and lasted until the late 1930s.
  • B. A. Santamaria

    B. A. Santamaria
    Bartholomew Augustine Santamaria, usually known as B. A. Santamaria, was an Australian Roman Catholic anti-Communist political activist and journalist. He was a guiding influence in the founding of the Democratic Labor Party.
  • The Labor Party Split

    The Labor Party Split
    The first split occurred in 1916 over conscription in World War I; the second in 1931 over the Premiers' Plan for economic recovery in the Great Depression; and the third in 1955 over alleged communist infiltration of the trade union movement.
  • Caritas

    Caritas
    Caritas began in Australia in 1962 as the Catholic Church Relief Fund (CCRF), which became the Catholic Overseas Relief Committee in 1964. In 1996 the agency became Caritas Australia. The word Caritas comes from Latin, and means love and compassion.
  • Vatican II

    Vatican II
    The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, commonly known as the Second Vatican Council, or Vatican II, addressed relations between the Catholic Church and the modern world.11 October 1962 –; 8 December 1965
  • Fr John Brosnan

    Fr John Brosnan
    Father John Brosnan, the much-loved Pentridge Prison chaplain and campaigner against capital punishment,
  • Establishment of the Maronite Eparchy

    Establishment of the Maronite Eparchy
    The Maronite Catholic Eparchy of Saint Maron of Sydney (in Latin: Eparchia Sancti Maronis Sydneyensis Maronitarum) (sometimes spelled Maroun) is an overseas Maronite rite (Antiochene rite) eparchy (diocese) of the Catholic Church in Australia, based in Sydney. In 2010 there were 160,000[2] members. It is currently ruled by Eparch Anthony Tarabay, OLM.
  • Islam on the census

    Islam on the census
    Islam entered the census count in 1976
  • Kathleen Mary Egan

    Kathleen Mary Egan
    Kathleen Mary Egan (1890-1977), Dominican Sister and educationist, was born on 16 December 1890 at The Rock, near Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, third child of Richard Egan, a railway stationmaster from Ireland, and his native-born wife Catherine, née Connors.
  • Buddhism on the census

    Buddhism on the census
    Buddhism entered the census in 1981
  • Catholicism becomes largest religious group

     Catholicism becomes largest religious group
    Catholicism became the largest religious group in 1986
  • Hinduism on the census

    Hinduism on the census
    Hinduism was included in the census in 1986
  • Edward Bede Clancy

    Edward Bede Clancy
    Edward Bede Clancy AC was an Australian Roman Catholic bishop and cardinal. He was the seventh Roman Catholic Archbishop of Sydney from 1983 to 2001. He was made Cardinal-Priest of Santa Maria in Vallicella in 1988.
  • Mabo

    Mabo
    On 3 June 1992, the High Court of Australia decided that terra nullius should not have been applied to Australia. This decision – known as the Mabo decision – recognised that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have rights to the land – rights that existed before the British arrived and can still exist today.
  • Native title

    Native title
    Native title is the designation given to the common law doctrine of Aboriginal title in Australia, which is the recognition by Australian law that Indigenous Australians have rights and interests to their land that derive from their traditional laws and customs.
  • Elizabeth Durack

    Elizabeth Durack
    Elizabeth Durack Clancy was a Western Australian modern artist and writer.
  • Wik

    Wik
    The Wik peoples are an Indigenous Australian group of people from an extensive zone on western Cape York Peninsula in northern Queensland, speaking several different languages. ... The first ethnographic study of the Wik people was undertaken by the Queensland born anthropologist Ursula McConnel.
  • World Youth Day

    World Youth Day
    World Youth Day 2008 was a Catholic youth festival that started on 15 July and continued until 20 July 2008 in Sydney, Australia. It was the first World Youth Day held in Australia and the first World Youth Day in Oceania. This meeting was decided by Pope Benedict XVI, during the Cologne World Youth Day of 2005.
  • Fr Frank Fletcher

    Fr Frank Fletcher
    Inspired by the Second Vatican Council, Fr Frank Fletcher believed modern theology placed too much emphasis on reason and logic and neglected religious experience, a reality that is mysterious and cannot be fully understood. He developed these ideas in his first book, Falling in Love with God (2010), where he presented the case for faith in which mind and heart are acknowledged as complementary.